Vietnam Politics Guide

Latest Vietnam Forum Posts

  • Feb 07 2015
    Vietnam’s Quiet Anniversary
    In 1971, Lieutenant John Kerry, speaking on behalf of Vietnam Veterans Against the War, posed his now famous question to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee: “How do we ask a man to be the last man to die for a mistake?” Decades later, we might offer a corollary: How do we commemorate a mistake? Fifty years ago this Saturday, on February 7, 1965, three hundred Vietcong guerrillas launched a raid on a U.S. Army installation and helicopter base near Pleiku, in the Central Highlands of South Vietnam—killing eight Americans, injuring a hundred and twenty-six more, and damaging or destroying twenty-five aircraft. It was that assault—even more than the Gulf of Tonkin incident of August, 1964—that drew the U.S.
  • A Malaysia Airlines flight carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew went missing off the Vietnamese coast on Saturday as it flew from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing and was presumed crashed
  • The Vietnamese air force has spotted two large oil slicks off the country's southern tip, suspected to be from the Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane that went missing on Saturday.
  • A Malaysia Airlines flight carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew went missing off the Vietnamese coast on Saturday and was presumed to have crashed. There were no reports of bad weather and no sign why the Boeing 777-200ER would have vanished from radar screens about an hour after it took off from Kuala Lumpur for Beijing. There were no signs of sabotage nor claims of a terrorist attack.
  • This war in Vietnam is very confusing not only to old war watchers but to people at home who read and try to understand. It is mainly diffi cult because of our preconceptions accumulated over several thousand years. This war is not like any we have ever been involved in. I’ll try to tell you some of the points of difference as I have observed them.

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