Displaying 1 - 10 of 26 Forum Posts1 2 3 Next
  • Nov 20, 2016 10:10 AM
    Last: 3yr
    756

    Congress tried with Dodd/Frank. It was minimal at best but whatever moves in the right direction are in danger of being rolled back. We must be aware that those 535 so-called legislators are, for the most part, acting on behalf of the plutocrats, not the common man.

    If there was any logic to the system, every state would have a state bank ala N Dakota and much of our big banking system would be nationalized. As it is now the greed factor runs rampant in our banking system.

  • Oct 28, 2016 01:29 PM
    Last: 3yr
    1k
    My Medicare premiums went up so my SS raise was a minus $77.
  • Nov 15, 2016 10:18 PM
    Last: 3yr
    654
    Plus labor is even being marginalized in China. Foxconn recently laid off 60,000 workers and replaced them with A1 robots. Capitalism doesn't care what happens to people until they run out of customers.
  • Oct 17, 2012 07:10 PM
    Last: 3yr
    12k

    The crisis in SS is going to be accelerated and exacerbated by today's economy in that the average worker is often a free agent. It's called the 1099 or the "gig" economy. The trend is steep in this direction wherein employers hire only temporary workers if demand increases and when it drops again that worker's gig is over. The worker is often off the books and neither contributes to the fund nor does the employer.

    Uber is a prime example of the gig economy. Uber does not contribute to the fund as they consider every driver a free agent. Occupations like home care health, landscapers, roofers, nannies and tutors are all becoming more of the total work force becoming a significant share. It's estimated at 5-6% as of a couple years ago and I believe it is much higher today and growing. Eventually, if it is to survive, the general tax fund must be tapped.

  • Nov 09, 2016 10:06 AM
    Last: 3yr
    502

    The Trump victory could result in vast changes in our import/export economy. If Trump gets his way tariffs will probably increase for imports. Can you say "protectionism"? It may not only be foreign countries affected. U.S. base corporations could see duties slapped on goods made overseas on product that hits the docks here. If he's serious about creating jobs here, what better way to get started.

    Time will tell.

  • Mar 10, 2016 05:57 AM
    Last: 3yr
    2.3k
    Dutch Wrote:
    TJ Wrote: Read my posts. It's about 3 things. What's the lowest amount I can produce it at. How can I sell the maximum numbers (I will give you a hint - lowest landed costs) what's the maximum profit level. It's all about rich people maximizing profits. Politicians are just a side note.
    Just watch "Shark Tank"; ask Mr. Wonderful how much "margin" you should have on your product. These elections show exactly that "money" rules; not the "working or unemployed " people. Castle Lords and Outcasts, which means we are are back into the Middle Ages; ask Trump, living in his gold plated apartment. The only difference is that the "guns" are here to stay instead of the bow and arrows.
    Politicians are enablers of corporations in monopoly positions who can determine their margins without fear of competition. The GOP is a wholly owned subsidiary of the monopoly and oligopoly class.
  • Nov 06, 2016 09:47 AM
    Last: 3yr
    324
    Speaking of "dark money," I recommend Jane Mayer's book sporting that title. Early on there's far from complete but informative list of like minded true believer billionaires who attend the Koch retreats.
  • Nov 12, 2015 07:14 PM
    Last: 3yr
    2.3k

    Even if nearly a million jobs have been added to the economy since 2008, we are still minus 2.2 million since 2002. The next question is, what kind of jobs are they. On average, I'd bet that those created are lower paying with fewer benefits than those lost.

    I've watched it happen too and jobs that put people solidly in the middle class are disappearing and rapidly so. There is absolutely no doubt about it. Productivity per man hour has skyrocketed but the productive workers do not benefit as they did from the '40s to the mid '70s. Also it's not just the Fortune 500 CEOs that take home outsized salaries, it includes small and mid sized companies where they can take advantage of the race to the bottom in workers' wages.

  • Mar 10, 2016 05:57 AM
    Last: 3yr
    2.3k

    I'm sure that NAFTA had some effect on employment in this country but certainly not the only reason for 60,000 plant closings. (It's actually many more in 2016) The"2nd industrial revolution" has had much more to do with it as technology has increased productivity per employee almost exponentially. Of course, slave labor overseas has contributed greatly as well.

    At a minimum the standard work week should be decreased to 32 hours or even less while individual income should not decrease. That is a tall order, I admit given our national religion of "free market capitalism." Retraining is the capitalists answer which is nonsense as replacing positions in kind with more highly skilled jobs is not even close to being in the cards. Counting on the private free market to provide employment anything close to a labor participation rate of even 70% is a dream worthy of a neoclassical economist only. It just isn't going to happen. The only hope is for government, wise government, to step in.

  • Nov 12, 2015 07:14 PM
    Last: 3yr
    2.3k

    The unemployment rate is deceiving. Look at the "labor participation rate" for a more accurate picture. It is at its lowest since 1978. What we are seeing now is a "gig economy" where a significant and growing percentage of the labor force is becoming populated by free agents. It's not a period of stagnation, it is a new reality and systemic. Labor has been marginalized to the extent that great numbers wait by the phone for a "gig" of 3-4 days to maybe 2 weeks of work are available. None of these workers are given health care, earn pensions or given a "living."

    As the global economy rears its ugly head more and more, labor is reduced to the lowest common denominator as CEOs now garner 300 times the average worker's pay oftentimes. Not that long ago the common multiplier was 15- 25 times the average workers' salary and workers retired with pensions and COBRA continuation for health care. No, I don't see things looking up. I see a dangerous trend toward technofeudalism.