Displaying 3 Forum Posts 
  • Jun 18, 2012 08:51 PM
    Last: 6yr
    7.8k
    I rely on Rachel to tell it like it is .. I'm looking forward to her follow up on Ebola.. It's not just over there ..It's here......
  • Jul 28, 2014 04:21 PM
    Last: 6yr
    6.3k
    I keep hearing about procedures that are followed by health care workers and that's all well and good but ... the last time I was in an emergency room , it was pretty scary to sit and wait with other sick people . The guy that died in Dallas. Texas was there twice so what are the chances he came in contact with anyone else that was there???
  • Jul 28, 2014 04:21 PM
    Last: 6yr
    6.3k
    jaredsxtn Wrote: The worst Ebola outbreak in recorded history currently wreaking havoc in West Africa is sounding alarm bells throughout the world that it may only be a matter of time before it breaks out of the African continent and makes its way to the rest of the world. The outbreak, which was first detected in March of this year, has already killed 672 and has infected 1,201 individuals.

    Two American doctors who have been working with Ebola patients have become infected and are receiving treatment in isolation. A Liberian doctor has also succumbed to the virus, passing away on Sunday. Dr. Samuel Brisbane, one of the health officials in Liberia, was the first physician to die of the virus since this current outbreak began.

    Ebola is a difficult virus to detect and treat because patients typically don't show any immediate signs of illness after coming in contact with the virus. The symptoms take two days to three weeks to fully materialize, making it incredibly difficult to contain. There is no cure for Ebola virus and the mortality rate is anywhere between 50 and 90 percent.

    The virus has spread to three West African countries, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea, and is certain to spread outward if doctors and health officials can not get a hold of the situation in the very near future. This outbreak has already far surpassed the most recent outbreaks dating back to the mid-1970's and has many health officials worried that they are on a race against time before it travels outside of Africa. The fact that an infected person can remain undetected for upwards of three weeks is a scary prospect for governments worldwide.

    Has anyone been following this story closely? What do you think the United States should do to prepare for an outbreak on its own shores? Multiple African countries have already set up isolation centers in their international airports to try to pick up passengers suspected of having the disease, but that is only a band-aid considering many people may not be showing any symptoms whatsoever and may not for weeks to come. Do you think it is inevitable for American airports to start doing the same thing in the near future? What else should or could we do to prevent it from spreading on American shores?