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  • When the Senate Intelligence Committee passed the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act by a vote of 14 to 1, committee chairman Senator Richard Burr argued that it successfully balanced security and privacy.
  • The recent release of photos purportedly showing Jennifer Lawrence and a number of other celebrities naked is a serious breach of privacy that should upset anyone who believes in the ideal that everyone, even celebrities, have an inalienable right to privacy. This right is not something that is given away whenever an individual achieves stardom and it must be protected.
Related Member Blog Articles
  • "They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right. The judgment of the Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit is reversed." And just like that, marriage equality is the law of the land.Today is a day millions of our citizens--both gay and straight--will never forget.
  • "After they drove the car into the ditch, made it as difficult as possible for us to pull it back, now they want the keys back. No! You can't drive. We don't want to have to go back into the ditch. We just got the car out." -- President Obama slamming Republicans on the campaign trail, May 2010.
  • “We, writers, journalists, intellectuals, call for resistance to religious totalitarianism and for the promotion of freedom, equal opportunity and secular values for all.”This was just part of a collaborative response by French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo to then-French President Jacques Chirac back in 2006.
  • 2014 was a great year for liberals. Marriage equality is sweeping across the nation, the federal courts now have a majority of liberal jurists, America's foreign policy is being reshaped in Obama's image, and both red and blue states voted to choose if they wanted to legalize a plant. Democrats may have lost the Senate, but their priorities surely won in 2014.
  • What should happen if someone threatens to kill you on social media? Are they protected by the First Amendment right guaranteeing the right to freedom of speech, or are they breaking the law? We will soon know now the answer after the Supreme Court rules on a case that may have far reaching ramifications well beyond the single case they are hearing.
  • For the 2014 midterm elections, the GOP has some truly scary candidates with extreme views on women's rights, the climate, and how our government should function. Some of them proudly tout their extreme beliefs while others hide behind them, but all of them would take us a step backward should they be elected.
  • Soon, thousand of police officers across the country will don body-worn cameras when they go out among the public. Those cameras will generate millions of hours of footage—intimate views of commuters receiving speeding tickets, teens getting arrested for marijuana possession, and assault victims at some of the worst moments of their lives. As the Washington Post and the Associated Press have reported, lawmakers in at least 15 states have proposed exempting body-cam footage from local open records laws. But the flurry of lawmaking speaks to a larger crisis: Once those millions of hours of footage have been captured, no one is sure what to do with them.
  • President Barack Obama will highlight plans next week to protect American consumers and businesses from cyber threats, a month after the most high-profile hacking attack on a U.S. company. Internet security became a national focus after a cyberattack on Sony Pictures that Washington blamed on North Korea. The attack and subsequent threats of violence against theaters prompted Sony to scale back its release of "The Interview", a comedy film that depicts the fictional assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.
  • You've seen it pop up numerous times in your Facebook feed: A status implying that the social networking site is using photos without consent. The status update is supposed to revoke Facebook's permission to do so.
  • From the garden terrace of a sixth-floor walkup on a quiet Berlin street, there was a clear view to the TV Tower, in Alexanderplatz. The tower, completed by the East Germans in 1969, once served as the biggest symbol of a regime that maintained its power by spying relentlessly on its citizens. It’s now a piece of harmless Cold War kitsch—a soaring concrete column with a shiny top resembling a disco ball. On the front door of the apartment somebody had affixed a sticker that mimicked the visual style of the “Hope” campaign poster for Barack Obama, with the words “Ein Bett für Snowden” (“A Bed for Snowden”) next to the face of the world’s most famous fugitive.
  • Twitter Inc (TWTR.N) sued the U.S. Department of Justice on Tuesday, intensifying its battle with federal agencies as the Internet industry's self-described champion of free speech seeks the right to reveal the extent of U.S. government surveillance. The lawsuit, which Twitter said follows months of fruitless negotiations with the government, marks an escalation in the Internet industry's battle over government gag orders on the nature and number of requests for private user information.
  • Sunday night, members of the internet forum 4chan leaked alleged nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton, Arianna Grande and other female celebrities. The photos were presumably hacked from celebrities's phones and computers without their consent. Lawrence's publicist later confirmed to Buzzfeed that the photos were legitimate. Lawrence, like thousands of other Americans, is now a victim of involuntary porn. Involuntary porn is classified as explicit photos and video released publicly without the consent of one of the parties involved. It's closely related to the dark world of revenge porn, where people punish there exes by posting explicit photographs or videos taken during their relationship.
  • In a major breach of privacy, a hacker leaked a series of pictures allegedly showing Jennifer Lawrence and other female celebrities in the nude. Apple confirmed Monday to CNN that it is looking into reports that its popular iCloud online data backup service may have been compromised by the hackers. "We take user privacy very seriously and are actively investigating this report," Apple spokeswoman Natalie Kerris said.
  • Nude photos purportedly showing many top stars, including Oscar-winner Jennifer Lawrence and pop star Rihanna, bounced around social media, in an apparent massive hacking leak, US media reported. “It’s so weird and hard how people take your privacy away from you,” Lawrence said in a tweet on Sunday. The actress’ agent, meanwhile, vowed to take legal action.

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