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A-Rod to be banned for life...or not

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  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Huffington Post, July 31, MLB prepared to ban A-Rod for life, suspend eight others:

    According to the Huffington Post in super big headlines:

    "Commissioner Bud Selig is prepared to levy a lifetime suspension on New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez, while suspending about eight others before the weekend, two people with knowledge of the negotiations told USA TODAY Sports.

    "The people were unauthorized to speak publicly because no announcement is expected until Thursday or Friday."


    I really don't know what it is in a person's mind that drives them to cheat. A-Rod had lots of talent that he didn't need that extra boost. And Lance Armstrong...maybe likewise.

    However, is a lifetime ban (assuming that happens tomorrow) the right ban for someone that has been so idolized by the public?
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Schmidt you say ..."I really don't know what is in a person's mind that drives them to cheat"...

    I can tell you what is in their mind: money. Lots and lots of money.

    A-Rod had enough talent to probably get into the Hall of Fame without cheating. But by taking steroids and lying about it and being an even better player, he could make MUCH more money. Same thing for Barry Bonds and many, many others.

    A-Rod is the highest paid player in baseball...at least until tomorrow. Steroids made the difference in a mere 50-75 maybe even a 100 million dollar cantract that he could have easily received without cheating, but A-Rod signed for 252 million, the biggest (and worst) contract ever.

    Lifetime ban is not enough for a cheater like A-Roid. The real shame is that he will get to keep the money he has been paid until now.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Yes greed is a big part of it. But for those in the really big money game like Alex Rodriguez, it is perhaps even more: the prestige of being the highest paid player in baseball. After a certain threshold salary level, the money is more of a symbol of recognition rather than absolute need.

    However, the drug use itself is only part of the story about A-Rod's likely lifetime suspension. According to this CBS article:

    "A Major League Baseball team executive told CBS News the commissioner's office is considering suspending Rodriguez for using performance-enhancing drugs and also violating the league's "integrity of the game" policy. Violating that policy could carry a lifetime ban.

    ""It is believed by baseball, at least, that he actively obstructed this investigation," said ESPN investigative reporter T.J. Quinn, who first reported the story in February. "They have looked into charges that he tampered with witnesses, that he tried to get documents, possibly have them destroyed. If they've got the evidence to back that up, that adds a whole other element to this case.""


    In other words, his career path is very similar to that of Lance Armstrong. Again I can see the temptation of athletes taking drugs to enhance performance, but the follow-up obstruction and lying will get you far worse penalties.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Schmidt greed is by far the biggest factor for most of them. For the big stars like A-Roid and Bonds and Armstrong it is greed plus ego. They want to be the very best AND get all the attention.

    For the thousands of players that no one ever heard of steroids can be and sometimes are the only difference between a career in the minor leagues and the major leagues, and it is all about money. They just want to make it to the big leagues. I think the major league minimum salary is 400K+ and average salary is in the millions and that is big incentive for a minor leaguer making a few thousand a year.

    The cheaters will always be willing to take the risk because they have no other way to get to the majors. When they max out their playing ability and it is obvious to them that they will never get to the next level because they are just not quite good enough, they see performance enhancing drugs as the last chance to make it. What have they go to lose?

    These are young guys and they aren't thinking 10, 20, 50 years into the future and what long term health risks may be associated with the illegal drugs. They are only concerned about their career opportunities right now.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Jamesn --

    Yes I agree...greed is the biggest factor for the thousands of athletes in all sports to cheat. However, cheating seems to be pervasive in all segments of our society from teachers and principals altering student test scores, to corporate CEOs doctoring their books, to Wall Street financial analysts putting out false reports about the credit worthiness of companies, to politicians lying and cheating on just about everything. Maybe the theme is more about morality in general, and why some people have no sense of guilt or conscience in cheating or lying. In Alex Rodriguez's case, his cheating in baseball is only a part of the story. As the discussion in Wikipedia, A-Rod's personal life is full of instances of infidelity to his wife, who eventually divorced him because of his cheating. So maybe A-Rod has just a different sense of moral behavior.

    A couple of years ago, Casey Schwartz published an article in the Daily Beast entitled: The Science of Why We Cheat

    "A lack of morality can lead to bad behavior—but can behaving badly make us lose our morals? Casey Schwartz on how lying, cheating, and stealing warps our sense of right and wrong.

    "The famous psychologist Albert Bandura coined the term “moral disengagement” to capture the process by which people pervert their own sense of right and wrong in order to give into a questionable temptation.

    "Yes I know he’s married, but it’s OK to sleep with him, the logic of moral disengagement goes, because, insert excuse here: I can’t stand his wife. If not with me, it would be with somebody else. This is his moral dilemma, not mine. The institution of marriage is a meaningless concept.

    "Moral disengagement essentially allows people to behave in ways that, at another moment, in a different mood, that same person would never consider. For years, research has shown again and again that moral disengagement influences how people will behave in a given situation. But now, in a chicken-and-egg twist, Shu and her team have shown that it works both ways: How people behave influences the moral beliefs they have about their behavior. Moral disengagement is the result of unethical behavior, they have now shown, not just the cause.

    "The implications of Shu’s findings align with the existing research and paint a troubling picture of how morality can easily spiral out of our grip without us even noticing. If both things are true—that attitude influences action and action influences attitude—it becomes easier to understand scenarios of runaway transgressions. You do something you know isn't good, you talk yourself out of feeling bad about it, you become more likely to do it again—and, having done it again, you’re back to telling yourself it doesn’t matter, it’s no big deal, it was just this once…

    "And just like that, you’ve done nothing wrong."
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    So is Alex Rodriguez's "moral disengagement" in his marriage also related to his drug use and lying about it? His attitudes influence his actions and his actions influence his attitudes...and bye bye any moral compass that might have been once a part of his life. Alex Rodriguez now says he wants to be a role model for young kids? Sports media have certainly cast him in that role for years...but now there is tarnish on that label. And lacking that moral compass how can he ever be that again?
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    I have no pity for A-Rod. Baseball has given him a lifetime (or three) of wealth.
    He's cheated and he should be punished. It should be harsh because there needs
    to be a serious deterrent. The use of Human growth hormone is what many players
    are using the last 5+ years. Being a natural substance may make testing a difficult
    thing.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    I agree with both of you guys, I have no use for A-Roid, he had a chance to be one of the best players ever WITHOUT cheating, but decided to cheat anyway and then spent years lying about it.

    I hope he gets banned for life.

    Schmidt when A-Roid says that he wants to be a role model for kids including his own kids? I'd tell him to start by telling the whole truth about his steroid use and admit that he lied all these years.

    THAT would be the way to start being a role model.

    Yes cheating is widespread and getting worse instead of better. Our nation has lost its morals, not everyone, of course, but more and more all the time. Lying and cheating in every aspect of life is just much more accepted than in the "good ole days", back when we were young.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    So should A-Rod be stripped of all of his honors and awards like Lance Armstrong?
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    So now I am reading about deal making...that is if A-Rod accepts guilt (for whatever), then he will instead be suspended for the duration of this season and all of next season. He can still come back to baseball (the Yankees?) in 2015. And why would he do that? Because he's still owed $100 million on his contract that runs through 2017, and he would lose that money under a life time ban.

    If that deal happens, Jamesn you are right...it's all about the money...lots and lots of money.

    Bud Selig would be the loser in this case. It's a deal Selig should not make if he can really prove the allegations of obstruction and tampering with evidence and witnesses.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Major League Baseball has suspended 13 players today including Alex Rodriguez. All of them have accepted their suspensions except A-Rod. He is appealing his suspension and will be playing in Chicago tonight. While A-Rod's suspension is for 214 games...the balance of the 2013 season and all of the 2014 season, Bud Selig did not invoke the "best interests of baseball'' clause that would have banned him for life for allegedly interfering in the investigation.

    And while A-Rod's suspension is under appeal, he can still play and make money off his contract.

    Is this good for baseball?
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Bad for baseball.

    We'll hear more about, and talk more about A-Roid and the suspension and appeal than the pennant races that we SHOULD be hearing and talking about this time of year, and the longer the appeal drags on the worse it will be for the game.

    It's all about the money for him even though he'll say it's his love of the game. He knows he will never get another contract so every decision he and his lawyers make will be to get every dollar out of his current contract.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Schmidt A-Roid is a big subject this morning on just about all media outlets as we all knew he would be. If anyone out there still doesn't think this (the appeal of the suspension) is not all about money, here are a few amazing numbers that were mentioned:

    A-Roid has been paid $273 million up to now.
    He currently makes $154,000 per game.
    His lowest salary when he was 19 years old was $442,000 per year.
    His highest salary (2013) is $33 million per year.
    The next two years of his contract pay more than the following two years, thus the incintive to push back and reduce the suspension.

    Anyone still think this is not about the money?

    The only way to REALLY make the players stop cheating is to make a rule that says is you fail the drug test your contract is voided. NO MORE MONEY!

    NO MORE MONEY! That's the only thing that will get their attention.