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Military Personnel Prohibited From Reading About NSA Leaks

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  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    The Army is reportedly blocking internal, internet access for all military personnel from being able to see The Guardian reports of Edward Snowden's NSA whistleblower articles. Maybe read that sentence again. It's a bit wordy, and might take a sec to sink in.. Military personnel are currently unable to pull up the coverage over the Edward Snowden story.

    An army official questioned about this said that it's routine for the Defense Department to take "network hygiene" action to prevent disclosure of classified information. "We make every effort to balance the need to preserve information access with operational security," a local California newspaper quoted this Army spokesman as saying. "However there are strict policies and directives in place regarding protecting and handling classified information."

    Is this right? Should we, as US civilians have more transparency and access to information than our military personnel?? What do you make of the term 'network hygiene'?

    Here's the article that broke the story: http://www.montereyherald.com/local/ci_23554739/restricted-web-access-guardian-...s
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    We, as US civilians have our own access to The Guardian, and so do military personnel...on their own computers. The Army or any branch of the military and US Government may be able to block access on "company computers" but that's it. If The Guardian has it available on their site, then military personnel will have just as much access to it just as the rest of us. Military people have computers at home just like the rest of us.

    What happens when you tell someone they can't look at a particular internet site? They want to see it, that's what.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Now I remember why I never joined the military. I often think 20 yrs in the military is an early retirement or a predictable job after 20 yrs. But this is an example of people trying to tell many how and what to think about. They must wrap it up with a brief summary of how you're supposed to think about things.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Many civilian companies do very much the same thing. Lots of companies block access to many sites on their computers, for different reasons maybe, but basically the same thing...

    I would guess that the majority of large companies block, or TRY to block pornographic sites as well as any access to e-mail accounts. Probably plenty of other things blocked, depending on the nature of the company.

    Telling people ..."how and what to think about"... is not limited to the Army.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    I've said many times, that our leaders are hiding a lot of things from the general public. Has anyone lately heard who or what our "drones" are doing? Or what are we doing in Syria? Or in the Pakistan border? So I can imagine since Wilileaks and now the Snowdon guy they are going to be even more tight lipped than ever. Due to the fact that survailance equipment has become more and more sophisticated; than automatically more things which were possible to hide in the past can be revealed. The government therefore has protected itself from all sides to prevent snooping on them. Sorry to say if this trend keeps going we likely have to protect all our devices of snooping. They will know exactly if you went to the bathroom to do what.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    Although it sucks, the policy that is, here in Philly, all police officers are required to give up their passwords and user names to all of the social sites that they participate on, including Facebook, and if they are deemed objectionable they are required to discontinue the use of the site.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    jamesn Wrote: Many civilian companies do very much the same thing. Lots of companies block access to many sites on their computers, for different reasons maybe, but basically the same thing...

    I would guess that the majority of large companies block, or TRY to block pornographic sites as well as any access to e-mail accounts. Probably plenty of other things blocked, depending on the nature of the company.

    Telling people ..."how and what to think about"... is not limited to the Army.
    Yes, companies block access on their computers. But, that's strictly for productivity reasons. They aren't blocking their employees, for instance, from seeing news stories of how they worked over a competitor or how they are tied up in a scandal. They aren't trying to hide information from their personnel about the goings on of the particular business.

    But, the Army is. It wants to limit military personnel from being exposed to this story before they can spin it to them in a more favorable direction.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    sb the Army knows that it can't keep its people from seeing the news about Snowden. Everyone in the Army who cares about it already knows as much as they want to know, the exception being some of the deployed personnel who do not have access to civilian computers. This is just useless overreaction by the government the same way they have useless overreactions to so many things. It's not spin as in indoctrination, it's just not condoning that material on their computers that they have an objection to. It's their computer so they control the content...it's just that simple, the same as civilian companies.

    Just more wasted effort by our government.