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Is Snowden really a traitor?

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  • Democrat
    Julian, CA
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    My U.S. Senator described Snowden as a traitor and of course everyone has a right to their opinion. My opinion is that Snowden is a hero revealing serious criminal activities going on in the U.S. Government. Feinstein and her fascist pals have voted to fund wars of aggression which are war crimes, they have voted for Nazi Acts and for the creation of the biggest most expensive (60 billion a year) big brother surveillance systems ever devised in human history. By the way, all those so called representatives in the U.S. Government take an oath to uphold the U.S. Constitution but instead have been busily turning our Constitution into confetti to the point America is no longer a Republic.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    The problem with using these broad sides is that it's not going to be helpful in changing things. As much as I disagree with the NSA surveillance program, I'm not going to jump to the conclusion that our Constitution has been shredded into confetti. The issue with the NSA surveillance program is that it appears to be perfectly legal under the Patriot Act of 2001, which has been reauthorized numerous times. The American public went to sleep after 9/11 and freely gave away all of these freedoms in the name of "national security." When we allow our government to over reach, they always will.

    I'm not quite sure what Nazi Acts you are referring to. That's another thing that just isn't going to help your cause. I can understand your frustration, but when one resorts to name calling and false charges their point of view will be automatically discarded.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    jared good reply and I agree with you. I do not know if Snowden is a traiter but he is a criminal, and it was no accident, he knew what he was doing. Was he copying Manning? That is the speculation that I have heard.

    Yes, governments will always get away with as much as they are allowed to get away with.
  • Democrat
    31602, GA
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    progressiveconnie Wrote: My U.S. Senator described Snowden as a traitor and of course everyone has a right to their opinion. My opinion is that Snowden is a hero revealing serious criminal activities going on in the U.S. Government. Feinstein and her fascist pals have voted to fund wars of aggression which are war crimes, they have voted for Nazi Acts and for the creation of the biggest most expensive (60 billion a year) big brother surveillance systems ever devised in human history. By the way, all those so called representatives in the U.S. Government take an oath to uphold the U.S. Constitution but instead have been busily turning our Constitution into confetti to the pohttp://www.democratichub.com/login-help.aspxint America is no longer a Republic.
    The patriot act was necessary in my opinion and we have to have surveillance systems to fight terrorists. We can no longer fight our enemies with guns and planes primarily when they are individual groups and not countries like the Nazis were primarily in Germany. The government does go overboard. That is why the press and the citizens have to keep a watchful eye out. Snowden is not a traitor and maybe not a criminal. He is probably an earnest patriotic citizen who believes he has an honest mission in helping to keep the country safe. However, he is very young to be trusted with highly secret information; he is not well educated and does not have enough maturity to be able to evaluate the material he was entrusted with. The statement that he was shocked that the army recruits were overly interested in killing shows his immaturity. That is what soldiers are trained to do. It seems to me the government is entrusting too much sensitive material with too many people who probably do not even need it. It is a good thing he has brought the issue out in the open so we can take the time to evaluate the right way to gather information to do the best job possible at protecting the country and preventing terrorist attacks. The person who said the terrorists already know most of what is being done is right; it is the people who do not and they have not been paying attention.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    progressiveconnie Wrote: My U.S. Senator described Snowden as a traitor and of course everyone has a right to their opinion. My opinion is that Snowden is a hero revealing serious criminal activities going on in the U.S. Government. Feinstein and her fascist pals have voted to fund wars of aggression which are war crimes, they have voted for Nazi Acts and for the creation of the biggest most expensive (60 billion a year) big brother surveillance systems ever devised in human history. By the way, all those so called representatives in the U.S. Government take an oath to uphold the U.S. Constitution but instead have been busily turning our Constitution into confetti to the point America is no longer a Republic.
    Connie is absolutely right; I wonder if there is another agency who checks on what is done with all the accumulated data; this is asking for corruption etc. For instance if they know what you have on your bankaccount then they also know ways to get at it. Also they get data which is used to blackmail extord etc. If you have contact with friends or family outside the US they can interprete that any way they like; so call you a terrorist etc. No this country is moving in a total wrong direction. This Snowden guy is like Wikileaks exposing that our government is not there for us but acts more as an over exited hobby club, who sees even in their dreams that there are 330 million terrorist living in this country.

    The famous slogan : "This keeps America safe" is absolutely the biggest fake statement ever invented; it is used for every exuse and people fall for it.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    Disguising a fishing expedition as a National Security program, which is what this whole program is, a fishing expedition, and then you stumble onto a plot 4 years ago and this becomes the justification for this little adventure in snooping, forgetting the fact that this same program failed to detect the Christmas Day plan to explode a device over the City of Detroit while on a airplane, or the Times Square bomb in a car and most recently the Boston Marathon bombing, which makes this whole National Security argument nothing more than an excuse to have the ends justify the means.
  • Democrat
    Julian, CA
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    I believe what I stated was the truth and I also believe that a Republic is not possible when the rule of law no longer applies to the rich and powerful. The U.S. Government is owned and operated by the Robber Barons and their Stooges and anyone who believes otherwise is a fool!
  • Center Left Democrat
    Democrat
    Flagstaff, AZ
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    ironically, the New York Times published the first installment of the Pentagon Papers on this day in 1971, and their publication generated much the same discussion that we are having today about Snowden's leak:

    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-new-york-times-publishes-the-pentagon-papers

    surprisingly, the Pentagon Papers came about due to Robert McNamara's decision to document the decisions that were made about the Vietnam War for future generations .. if you haven't read his book, "In Retrospect" yet, I'd recommend doing so ..

    like most people, I'm not comfortable about having a bunch of phone and computer records under surveillance .. once the new date center in Utah gets completed, it will get more intense ..

    http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/994293_590294017659969_243339469_n.jpg

    Thomas Friedman wrote a good column about this issue on Tuesday of this week .. does a good job of explaining both sides of the issue:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/12/opinion/friedman-blowing-a-whistle.html?ref=thomaslfriedman
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    progressiveconnie Wrote: I believe what I stated was the truth and I also believe that a Republic is not possible when the rule of law no longer applies to the rich and powerful. The U.S. Government is owned and operated by the Robber Barons and their Stooges and anyone who believes otherwise is a fool!
    The rule of law has always been skewed towards the rich and powerful. It has been for thousands of years before this country was founded and has been for the 200 plus years that we have been a Republic. To act like it is a new thing in human evolution is just not accurate. Take a look at the hundreds of laws that we currently have on the books that disproportionately go after the poor and racial minorities in our society. This is not a new thing.

    I am rather unsettled about the NSA program and believe it is in clear violation of my 4th Amendment right. On the other hand, the Patriot Act that was signed by George W Bush just days after 9/11 effectively rendered the 4th Amendment null and void. We can all kick and scream as much as we want to, but until Congress overturns it or the Supreme Court steps in and renders it unconstitutional, it is still the law of the land whether we like it or not. I wholeheartedly believe that the Patriot Act is unconstitutional, but unfortunately I don't have the power to render it so.

    What robber barons are you referring to when you say that our government is owned by them? I believe that outside money plays far too big of a role in what is supposed to be a constitutional democracy of, by, and for the people and I think it's an absolute shame that many of our legislatures at the national level do not act for the greater good of society. But, I ask who is to blame for this? Corruption has been around for just as long as the rule of law and it too has always been rather one sided. I'd be hard pressed to find any time in our nations history that wasn't rife with corruption. Actually, I'd venture to say that we are living in one of the least corrupt era's of our nations history if you look at the grand scheme of things.

    Absolute power corrupts absolutely and it's our responsibility to check that power, but the American public has gone to sleep when it comes to participating in our democracy. The whole point of my earlier retort to you was that we have fallen asleep as a citizenry. We turned out by the millions to vote for Senator Obama in 2008 and then figured that we did our job, but it's not that easy. We are not going to move forward as a society if we do our civic duty once every four years and leave our elected officials to do whatever they want. We have to hold their feet to the fire. We have to make our voices heard. If you're unhappy with Senator Feinstein then call her office and notify her of your grievance. Call the representative from your district and let them know too. Our officials need to hear from the people that they represent. They will listen every once in awhile.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    Rather than check the whistleblowers claim as to the truth of the matter, the powers that be instead do their damn best to discredit the whistleblower, so if the claims have any ring of truth to them, then very few would believe him. Much like snitches in law enforcement, whistleblowers are necessary to uncover Government wrong doing.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Yes both of you look at it the way it is; yeah what can we as little nothings do about it. A typical example is again what was on the news today:
    Obama wants now to sent weapons to the rebels in Syria. Guess who told himto do that? mr. McCain was there remember!! Also in the meantime Obama approved another $325 billion for the Pentagon. I guess McCains backpocket is swelling as well his cheek!! Wow. This will keep America safe!! Hoeray!!!
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Sorry Dutch, Not McCains fault.

    Long before McCain went to Syria Obama stupidly declared that Syria could not cross the "RED LINE" of using chemical weapons (a game changer!). Now that they decide that Syria has crossed the line, Obama has to get involved because of what he said.

    No doubt McCain will support getting involved, but this is all about the president making stupid threats.

    I think, and hope, that the president is smart enough to keep our troops out of it, but I expect that some of our special forces will be involved. They may be involved already.
  • Other Party
    Tennessee
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    The military head of the NSA has stated under oath that Snowden has told nothing but lies. If that is the fact, how can they charge him with disclosing national secrets? Seems to me at most he could be charged with making up national secrets.
  • Democrat
    Massachusetts
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    johnnycee Wrote:Rather than check the whistleblowers claim as to the truth of the matter
    What evidence is there of that? I would hope that verifying matters related to safeguarding national secrets would be done in secret.

    johnnycee Wrote:the powers that be instead do their damn best to discredit the whistleblower
    The reality is that Snowden was in the wrong. If he was willing to fall on his sword for freedom, as he seemed to imply, then he should have actually fallen on his sword, i.e., reveal what he revealed and faced justice. His running and hiding practically convinced me of his guilt and of the less than virtuous aim of his actions.

    johnnycee Wrote:Much like snitches in law enforcement, whistleblowers are necessary to uncover Government wrong doing.
    Then let's agree to that, as a nation, and put in place whistleblower laws that whistleblowers can safely and effectively use. There have actually been three upgrades to such laws over the last twenty-five years: If they didn't cover Snowden, that's too bad, but doesn't excuse Snowden's actions.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    I am going to assume a wait and see attitude on whether or not this guy Snowden is a traitor or hero, in the meantime this whole affair has taken on a more ominous turn with Putin more interested in showing the world body politic his thumbing his nose at the U.S. government and showing just how low we( the U.S.) have fallen in regards to respect and fear throughout the World, is that the fault of Snowden or the facts of his supposed revelations of spying by our Government, or worse yet, how did this young guy with so little experience gain such access to highly sensitive material, so I suppose the answer lies in the fact that the authorities are more interested in finding Snowden rather how he was able to be in such a position to do harm to our Nation.