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Pope Benedict XVI to resign

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  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Washington Post, February 11, 2013: Pope Benedict XVI to resign, citing age and waning energy

    "LONDON — Recognizing what he described as his failing strength of “mind and body,” Pope Benedict XVI on Monday announced that he would become the first pontiff to resign since 1415.

    "Benedict’s decision to step down Feb. 28 means that for the first time in almost six centuries, there will be a living former pope looking on as his successor leads the Catholic church."

    He is 85 years old. What does that mean for the Catholic Church?
  • Democrat
    Lawrence, MA
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    Schmidt Wrote: Washington Post, February 11, 2013: Pope Benedict XVI to resign, citing age and waning energy

    "LONDON — Recognizing what he described as his failing strength of “mind and body,” Pope Benedict XVI on Monday announced that he would become the first pontiff to resign since 1415.

    "Benedict’s decision to step down Feb. 28 means that for the first time in almost six centuries, there will be a living former pope looking on as his successor leads the Catholic church."

    He is 85 years old. What does that mean for the Catholic Church?

    What does it mean ? Nothing. Since John Paul loaded the College of Cardinals with right wingers.....they will elect one of their own to pretend he is representing Christ on earth.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    I guess he gets a healthy "heavenly" pension; and will go on a cruise around the world and chase virgins or grab little choir boys.
  • Center Left Democrat
    Democrat
    Flagstaff, AZ
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    Schmidt:


    Pope Benedict was 78 years old when he became Pope, which means that you're not likely to see any huge change n the church's philosophy anytime soon. Personally, I'd love to see a 65 woman become Pope, but that's likely to happen right after the event pictured below:

    http://cache.boston.com/images/bostondirtdogs//Headline_Archives/pigs_fly.jpg


    Believe it on not, there currently ARE Roman Catholic women priests (and bishops), which you can learn more about at the link below:


    http://pinksmokeoverthevatican.com/


    Just as the Republican Party is finally starting to realize that it can't survive by being a party just for Old White Guys (to quote Bobby Jindal, the GOP needs to stop being the stupid party) , the Catholic Church will eventually need to make some fundamental changes in order to serve the needs of its flock, starting with ordaining women and married men. Even Catholic sources acknowledge that the number of parish priests has dropped dramatically in the last 30 years. In some large metropolitan areas, some churches (like my old parish in St. Paul) have to share ONE priest with at least one other parish:

    http://www.osv.com/tabid/7621/itemid/6532/In-Focus-Facing-a-future-with-fewer-Catholic-prie.aspx

    I've been a "fallen away Catholic" for at least 20 years, but the Vatican's recent criticism of some of the nuns in the Catholic Church
    would lead me to believe that the Vatican is more than a little out of touch with reality if I were still attending:

    http://tohell-andback.blogspot.com/2012/12/love-cannot-be-silenced.html


    During the history of the Catholic Church, there have been ELEVEN Popes who lived less than 35 days before dying in office. The most recent was John Paul 1, who died in 1978 after serving for 33 calendar days. If the College of Cardinals had more sense, they would make 65 years old the MAXIMUM age for being elected Pope. Ronald Reagan was 17 days short of 70 when he was first elected, and it didn't take very long before his Alzheimers disease started to affect his judgement.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope#Death
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    How long till American Catholics split from Rome? Can't be too much longer if the church continues to slide way to the right.
  • Liberal
    Independent
    Durham, NH
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    This is the same "Scum Bag" that enabled thousands of young kids to be molested by the very priests he was in charge of! If there is a hell he sure belongs there with the rest of them!
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Arizona --

    Thanks for the additional insight into Pope Benedict. Several people are trying to read more into his reason for abdicating, but it seems that the guy is genuinely tired and can no longer meet the demands of his job. At 85 years old I can empathize. That's beyond the life expectancy of most male Americans.

    It does seem that the decks are stacked for electing another conservative pope. And the Italians would like to see an Italian pope.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    "pgr" do not worry; he won't die poor for sure; at least he gets a coffin laced with gold!! I just wonder if you are Pope then certainly because of the connections you have in "heaven" then you must be able to stay young forever and never get senile either. So I guess he forgot to pay his dues and the "up there" cell phone service. Hallejuja, can I get his nice hat, would be nice for my birthday party.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    I just saw some interesting things onthe news about this "church". First of all the "pope" had some heart problems and needed a new "pacer"; thus it is a "human" after all and suffers the same problems as us; so his connections "up there" do not help him much.

    Second the "church" is in all kind of troubles; they are loosing money right now due to people giving less money (especially in Europe) and investments they had lost due to the world economy recession.

    Third they are accused of money laundering of shady funds obtained just after WWII (Jewish money, via you know who?) which is now being investigated. They still have as assets a lot of land and property; according to the news, they are the third largest land owners in the world.
    Since their mostly tax free status, they can easyly sell some assets and their bussiness will pickup. Right now they have a venture with a Swiss company to issue their own credit cards as well. So actually this church is a pure bussiness venture based on property ownership.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Dutch --

    You have hit one of my "hot buttons" again when you talk about the tax free status of churches. I don't have any problem for making tax deductions for true benevolence, and for some churches that might consume maybe 90 percent of their expenditures. I'm okay with that. Although a non-religious person, I do contribute to one of the missions in my city because of their support to homeless veterans.

    But for many of the other large ministries and mega churches, the church has become a "big business" for profit...and in some cases, political gain. In my city of Colorado Springs, home to James Dobson's Focus on the Family and other big churches, the topic of tax exempt status has become a sore point, especially as churches are springing up all over the place, and buying up property for which they are exempt from paying property taxes. That means that more of the burden is shifted to homeowners like me that do pay property taxes.

    The Catholic Church is indeed one of the largest property owners in the world, but so are other churches getting on that tax free band wagon. Somewhere, somehow it needs to be reined in.

    For those that want to discuss this topic, I'll refer you to the ProCon.org website and their good article: Churches and Taxes. I recommend it. You can read all the pros and cons that have ever been cited in this website in the past and much more. Pick and choose.
  • Democrat
    Meridian, MS
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    Good website and good reading too Schmidt. I didn't realize that there has been so much head-butting by religious organizations and the government over tax exemption status. But like any other "rule" or "law", there will be abuse if abuse is possible. And I agree with your assessment that it needs to be reined in. Now sure seems like as good a time as any to do so, with the huge deficit we are facing. Maybe a "base-level of assets" could be defined for each church or religion, depending on number of parish members, location(s), etc. and while still giving the churches a relatively significant level of income tax exemption, they could be (property) taxed say on all assets (including cash reserves) exceeding so many dollars of evaluation. Just an idea, but any action has to begin with an idea.
  • Democrat
    Brookline , MA
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    Schmidt, your quote "It does seem that the decks are stacked for electing another conservative pope. And the Italians would like to see an Italian pope." Unquote, you think?
    I am not familiar with WHO are the Cardinals who would be elected to be the next Pope. And I am not sure if Pope Benedict's portrait would be added to the Portraits of Popes hanging up the ceiling of St. Paul Church in the Vatican City of Rome. There are about five (5) I believe, blank frames hanging up there when I visited that church...and I was told that when those frames are completely filled, it would be the ending of the world, the coming of Christ in due Judgment. How true? not sure.
    Anyway, I hope to see a Cardinal who belongs to the Society of Jesus, Jesuit, who I would like to see become a Pope (Italian or otherwise). As such, the whole Catholic Faith will truly see the light of our purpose here on earth. Jesuits are known to be Pious, yes, but they also believe in the Philosophical way of approaching the Faith base also in human reality. Jesuits, like St. Thomas Aquinas & St. Agustin are Philosophers who believe that we are not Christ, we are not God, we can only imitate the goodness but not be like one. My Faith as a Catholic believes (like the Jesuits), in the human frailty, sinning & forgiving, it can not be Gospel Truth. Sorry, my fellow Catholics, but my being a Catholic does not mean I am against the dogmas of my Faith. The Seat of Wisdom, which in human term is the Brain inside our head must be used in terms of Wisdom....our Free Will. Not even God can dictate upon our free will, because after all God gave us that one freedom. Anything else after thatl, is between you and God alone, not between you and human kind and its criticism. Men (humankind) will be judge accordingly not by humans standards but God himself.
    Everyone knows where Philosophy thrives, theology dies and vice versa, when Theology thrives, Philosophy dies. We live in the material/physical world, we must act according to the demand of our human perception. Philosophy (reason & logic) will guide us to meet those demands without infringing on our spiritual nature. Like Christ said "do not pull the bad weeds, let them grow and thrive along with the good weeds for at the end Judgment prevails." So who are we as humans be the force dictators of our human needs. God gave the Ten (10) Commandments, it is the most violated Law on the face of the Earth. As for God, ( to those who believe He exist) human can do as they well please, but at the end humans has dues to pay...'tis all.
    I hope the next Pope will Shepperd my Faith not basing only to my spiritual needs but will see me through overcoming the obsolete and present by me my physical needs as well as my spiritual need of my TIME.
  • Democrat
    Meridian, MS
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    Hey Sabrina good to see you back on here. My first two years of college were at Creighton U. in Omaha, Neb. That is a Jesuit school, and most of the teachers were Jesuit priests. Theology classes, as well as Latin, were very interesting experiences. Chemistry, math, and physics were not taught by the priests, but still very interesting to me. I am hoping for an American, at least North American Pope. The world is changing, so why can't the Church change too? I guess a Jesuit would be as good as any.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    The following was posted today; it shows that this church remains just about as our government a political organization, just there for the money.


    VATICAN CITY (AP) — For an institution devoted to eternal light, the Vatican has shown itself to be a master of smokescreens since Pope Benedict XVI's shock resignation announcement.

    On Thursday, the Vatican spokesman acknowledged that Benedict hit his head and bled profusely while visiting Mexico in March. Two days earlier the same man acknowledged that Benedict has had a pacemaker for years, and underwent a secret operation to replace its battery three months ago.

    And as the Catholic world reeled from shock over the abdication, it soon became clear that Benedict's post-papacy lodgings have been under construction since at least the fall. That in turn put holes in the Holy See's early claims that Benedict kept his decision to himself until he revealed it.

    Vatican secrecy is legendary and can have tragic consequences — as the world learned through the church sex abuse scandal in which bishops quietly moved abusive priests without reporting their crimes.

    And the secrecy is institutionalized from such weighty matters to the most trivial aspects of Vatican life.

    "You have to understand that actually every Vatican employee and official takes an oath of secrecy when they assume their job," said John Thavis, author of "The Vatican Diaries," an investigation into the workings of the Holy See. "And this isn't something that is taken lightly. They swear to keep secret any office matters and anything pertaining to the pope."

    One of the most famous cases of Vatican secrecy was the Holy See's efforts to cover up the fact that Pope John Paul I's dead body was discovered by a nun. The eventual revelation helped fuel conspiracy theories over the death of the pope who ruled for only 33 days in 1978.

    The Vatican is so obsessed with secrecy that the first and only official confirmation that John Paul II had Parkinson's disease was in his death certificate.

    The Vatican justifies itself by arguing that its officials are holders of the divine truth, unaccountable to worldly laws. In particular, the pope's word is the final say on any issue — infallible on some doctrinal matters. But groups representing sex abuse victims, and other Catholics angered by the scandal, have been demanding modern standards of accountability and calling for reforms.
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    Dutch Wrote: The following was posted today; it shows that this church remains just about as our government a political organization, just there for the money.


    VATICAN CITY (AP) — For an institution devoted to eternal light, the Vatican has shown itself to be a master of smokescreens since Pope Benedict XVI's shock resignation announcement.

    On Thursday, the Vatican spokesman acknowledged that Benedict hit his head and bled profusely while visiting Mexico in March. Two days earlier the same man acknowledged that Benedict has had a pacemaker for years, and underwent a secret operation to replace its battery three months ago.

    And as the Catholic world reeled from shock over the abdication, it soon became clear that Benedict's post-papacy lodgings have been under construction since at least the fall. That in turn put holes in the Holy See's early claims that Benedict kept his decision to himself until he revealed it.

    Vatican secrecy is legendary and can have tragic consequences — as the world learned through the church sex abuse scandal in which bishops quietly moved abusive priests without reporting their crimes.

    And the secrecy is institutionalized from such weighty matters to the most trivial aspects of Vatican life.

    "You have to understand that actually every Vatican employee and official takes an oath of secrecy when they assume their job," said John Thavis, author of "The Vatican Diaries," an investigation into the workings of the Holy See. "And this isn't something that is taken lightly. They swear to keep secret any office matters and anything pertaining to the pope."

    One of the most famous cases of Vatican secrecy was the Holy See's efforts to cover up the fact that Pope John Paul I's dead body was discovered by a nun. The eventual revelation helped fuel conspiracy theories over the death of the pope who ruled for only 33 days in 1978.

    The Vatican is so obsessed with secrecy that the first and only official confirmation that John Paul II had Parkinson's disease was in his death certificate.

    The Vatican justifies itself by arguing that its officials are holders of the divine truth, unaccountable to worldly laws. In particular, the pope's word is the final say on any issue — infallible on some doctrinal matters. But groups representing sex abuse victims, and other Catholics angered by the scandal, have been demanding modern standards of accountability and calling for reforms.
    This accounts for two things.
    1. Why the sex scandle was so big and stretched for such a length of time.
    2. Why at one time the U.S. did not allow Catholics to make it past Ellis Island. Fear they would be a nation within a nation.