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Prohibition of Alcohol similar to prohibition of Marijuana?

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  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    Armed gangs in full control of something because it was illegal to possess it. Police having to spend countless hours going after non-violent "criminals." Rampant crime. Sound familiar?

    The prohibition of alcohol ushered in a wave of crime throughout this country as the likes of Al Capone sought to make a fortune off of something that the average person wanted, but couldn't easily acquire. Most of the time the police were raiding speakeasy's and low level manufactures of alcohol because they couldn't get their hands on the big timers. What happened in the end was every day people that just wanted a drink wound up losing it all. The American people eventually had enough thirteen years later and did the first repeal of a Constitutional Amendment in our countries history.

    It's been nearly eighty years since alcohol became legal again, yet we have not learned the lessons of prohibition when it comes to Marijuana. The criminalization of marijuana has sent countless of non-violent criminals to prison, destroyed countless of citizens lives, and forced otherwise law abiding citizens to operate in the shadows to acquire a plant that grows naturally. Why doesn't our government do what they did when they enacted the Twenty-First Amendment and regulate the trade and sale of it?

    When will we wake up as a citizenry and demand the full decriminalization of marijuana?
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    Couldn't agree more. We are on our way though. Colorado and Washington have just fully legalized marijuana. And at least 18 states have passed legislation to decriminalize or legalize marijuana for medicinal use. So, we are close to having half of the states showing that their states are in favor of some form of legalization. It seems just a matter of time until this sea change becomes the majority, even if just slightly. Once that happens, I predict the 100th monkey type situation. I think that once the 26th state passes something, the nation (hopefully) gets expedited and within a few years marijuana is legal everywhere.

    I do think, however, that CO and WA need to be shining examples. And, that things can't go wrong, for whatever reason, for my hope to manifest into reality. Fingers crossed on that one. I fear the federal government on this one, sorry to say.
  • Independent
    Plymouth, WI
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    Great posts both of you, it is good to see people wondering about this, however, there really is a huge difference between alcohol being legal and pot being legal. Alcohol doesn’t threaten the paper industry or the cotton industry, but hemp sure does. In fact, it is because of the paper industry that pot is considered the worse of drugs; pot according to the federal government, is a schedule 1 drug, meaning there are no drugs worse than pot. The majority NOW however, knows that pot is far from the worse of drugs. The feds spent millions back in the day on commercials that brainwashed the majority against pot, showing pregnant women jumping from two story windows after just one joint of pot, crazy but all too true. Why is pot so bad in the eyes of the feds back then and still today? Because of lobby money, that is why. Back in the day the paper industry lobbied the feds, giving them millions to make hemp illegal, why, because hemp puts the owners of trees used for paper out of business. One billionaire back in the day controlled most of the forest used for paper, he made sure pot would be so illegal; it would never threaten his investment in forest. Hemp makes way better paper with way less pollution to turn it into paper, of course the tree industry was worried, but not no more, now that hemp is a schedule 1 drug, no one will be making paper with it. If there was ever great proof to how the lobby system works to screw the majority, pot is a great example. It is far time to legalize pot, and even further time to end the lobby legal pay off system of America. If the feds are not going to do as the majority wishes, maybe it really is time to get rid of them? Pot is just one example of federal laws screwing us, look at oil if you really want to see a kick in the majority’s butt.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    I couldn't agree more, unitedmajority. I would add another industry to the list, though. Big Pharma doesn't want marijuana legalized either. They are well aware that if people turned to pot to ease their pains, fewer and fewer people would need to take a pill to do the same thing. It is amazing how corporations had just as much power back then. In many instances, they had more power. I fully agree that it is far past the time that we end the lobby pay off system that we have now. We need lobbyist for the poor and the middle class, not just the super rich that have a vested interest in keeping the status quo.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    "We need a lobbyist for the poor and middle class" well yes we'd all agree to that one. One problem is that lobbyists and the entire lobby industry runs on one thing: money! What so the poor and middle class lack that the rich has? Money!

    Another thing that all of us or most of us would agree with is that Big Pharma doesn't want marijuana legalized. Why? Money! However, Big Pharma owns lots of our elected politicians, just as Big Oil, Big Unions, Big Medical Care, Big Insurance, Big ______ (insert name here) not to mention the smaller special interests.

    Yes, you can rest assured that Big Pharma will pump Big Money into the fight against legalizing marijuana.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Medical Marijuana has many benefits to the sick. For patients on chemo therapy, they have no appitite. This is aided by Med. Mar., People with terminal cancer have much depression, Med. Mar assists with that. Many have severe pain. Not all react well to the chemical effects of prescription meds., especially how they interact with other meds the patient is taking. PTSD, perhaps it would help with that stress. It's not going to help with everything. Many in states that allow it seem to find relief from it. I'm sure that some abuse the situation but as long as they're sitting at home laughing at an old comedy movie and eating Little Debbie cakes or doughnuts, I have no problem with it.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Mclellan you are absolutely right. Everything you just said is just common sense. And one thing we know is that common sense will not be tolerated by many of our lawmakers. What WILL be tolerated is big money, big payoffs, big kickbacks...

    Another thing we know is that it's not that "some abuse the situation" what we know for sure is that lots and lots will abuse the situation. More will use and abuse medical marijuana just to "legally" get high than will use it for legitimate needs. That does not mean that it should not be legalized for those who need it.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Sure it will be abused. But, you can't legally buy it without a medical card which is issued by the Doctor. I wonder if insurance pays for it ? Never thought about that part before.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    And getting a medical card which is issued by the Doctor is as easy as walking into the "Doctors" office and telling him that you have migranes or back pain. And it only takes one "Doctor" to issue thousands of medical cards per year. Once it is legalized, these "Doctors" see how easy it is to make money off the system, so easy that some of them almost exclusively see medical marijuana "patients".
  • Democrat
    Lawrence, MA
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    jaredsxtn Wrote: Armed gangs in full control of something because it was illegal to possess it. Police having to spend countless hours going after non-violent "criminals." Rampant crime. Sound familiar?

    The prohibition of alcohol ushered in a wave of crime throughout this country as the likes of Al Capone sought to make a fortune off of something that the average person wanted, but couldn't easily acquire. Most of the time the police were raiding speakeasy's and low level manufactures of alcohol because they couldn't get their hands on the big timers. What happened in the end was every day people that just wanted a drink wound up losing it all. The American people eventually had enough thirteen years later and did the first repeal of a Constitutional Amendment in our countries history.

    It's been nearly eighty years since alcohol became legal again, yet we have not learned the lessons of prohibition when it comes to Marijuana. The criminalization of marijuana has sent countless of non-violent criminals to prison, destroyed countless of citizens lives, and forced otherwise law abiding citizens to operate in the shadows to acquire a plant that grows naturally. Why doesn't our government do what they did when they enacted the Twenty-First Amendment and regulate the trade and sale of it?

    When will we wake up as a citizenry and demand the full decriminalization of marijuana?
    Let me push this idea a little.....heroin should also be leaglized as it is in some other countries. What happens is that the government runs the drug operation instead of the criminals. Addicts sign up for the program and go to the clinic daily to get their affordable shot (s). They don't have to be breaking into homes for the necessary money. Many of them proceed from the clinic to a place of employment. The billions ...yes, billions of dollars leaving this country for Columbia and Mexico would remain here.....The crime rate would drop drastically and drug leagalization would mean that half the people going into the prison would remain free..... The staggering amount of tax money the government has spent over the years trying to stop the illegall drug trade has accomplished what ??? ..... I've also read that legalization of drugs makes experimentation less glamorous for young people. If they have to sign up as addicts to try it they are not as eager.......Many blessings proceed from sanity.....
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    If we, the anti-prohibition folks, shift the argument to Hemp then the issue becomes far more economic and less about recreational use. Many will disagree with my belief that a jazz album on the turntable and a couple of bong hits is the best way to reduce blood pressureand melt away the days stress. I'm OK with that.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    I couldn't agree with you more, leftofcenter. I have this discussion with individuals quite often. There are people out there that are going to do drugs no matter if they are legal or not. Why not decriminalize these drugs and provide safe environments for these addicts? I also agree that when something is legal, the youth are much less likely to become addicts. The "War on Drugs" has been an abysmal failure and it's well past time to begin a national discussion on the pros and cons of decriminalizing all drugs.

    The issue of drug use can not be divorced from the "War on Poverty," which is also an abysmal failure. There are thousands upon thousands of non-violent criminals in our prisons because of our drug laws. These users are labeled as felons for the rest of their lives and are much more susceptible to a life of crime after getting out of the corrections system because they can't find a decent job. Just think if we spent the amount of money that we do on our prisons on actually funding our public education system and job skills programs.

    It is far less expensive to do this, but there are many entrenched special interests in this country that will fight tooth and nail to make sure this will not happen. The private prison system in this country needs prisoners to stay profitable. Until we wake up as a country and say we're not going to take that anymore, then we will continue to send non-violent criminals to prison and will keep the endless cycle going.
  • Democrat
    Lawrence, MA
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    Jared, We could ask folks to join in and start a letter writing campaign to newspapers and magazines try getting some interests going on the issue. The the issue. The current approach is obviously worthless.
  • Democrat
    Florida
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    Comparing prohibition of alcohol is not relevent. The alcohol industry started the prohibition against pot. And why would the AMA or med industry back it? It would cut down on the chemicals that we need to ingest to stay alive/active.
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    Ernest Daniel Wrote: Comparing prohibition of alcohol is not relevent. The alcohol industry started the prohibition against pot. And why would the AMA or med industry back it? It would cut down on the chemicals that we need to ingest to stay alive/active.
    Nope, cotton and wood pushed to ban Pot in order get Hemp out of the way. Nowadays, the beer industry is fearful of any and all other recreational buzzes. Hemp isn't even in the cards, but should be.