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Religions MUST be taught in public schools

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    Dutch wrote the following:

    Please tell me where the statement came from with proof please,not just some writing done by humans your statement: "He created the entire universe". I never realized that a tiny baby who filled his diapers was able to do so; then in this case if so his Dad created such because the world was already there for a long time, so please tell me what this baby "created"? More dirty diaper/goatskins? I agree that there were more wars which were not fought for religeous reasons; the reason I mentioned these religeous wars is if these would not have been fought millions of life's would have been spared; so in other words religions killed millions not saved millions.

    LittleNipper wrote: Dutch, you will have to prove that some man living in asmall town in some backward country 2000 years ago could concoct the following, so profround and above what the "sophisticated" cultures of Egypt, Greece, Roman, and the Orient had written extendeding to this present time.
    John 1:1-18
    New International Version (NIV)

    1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was with God in the beginning. 3 Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made. 4 In him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind. 5 The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.
    6 There was a man sent from God whose name was John. 7 He came as a witness to testify concerning that light, so that through him all might believe. 8 He himself was not the light; he came only as a witness to the light.

    9 The true light that gives light to everyone was coming into the world. 10 He was in the world, and though the world was made through him, the world did not recognize him. 11 He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him. 12 Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God— 13 children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God.
    14 The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.
    15 (John testified concerning him. He cried out, saying, “This is the one I spoke about when I said, ‘He who comes after me has surpassed me because he was before me.’”) 16 Out of his fullness we have all received grace in place of grace already given. 17 For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. 18 No one has ever seen God, but the one and only Son, who is himself God and is in closest relationship with the Father, has made him known.

    Compare this to the Prophetic words found in Isaiah Chapter 53 --- Old Testament

    Isaiah 53
    New International Version (NIV)

    53 Who has believed our message
    and to whom has the arm of the Lord been revealed?
    2 He grew up before him like a tender shoot,
    and like a root out of dry ground.
    He had no beauty or majesty to attract us to him,
    nothing in his appearance that we should desire him.
    3 He was despised and rejected by mankind,
    a man of suffering, and familiar with pain.
    Like one from whom people hide their faces
    he was despised, and we held him in low esteem.

    4 Surely he took up our pain
    and bore our suffering,
    yet we considered him punished by God,
    stricken by him, and afflicted.
    5 But he was pierced for our transgressions,
    he was crushed for our iniquities;
    the punishment that brought us peace was on him,
    and by his wounds we are healed.
    6 We all, like sheep, have gone astray,
    each of us has turned to our own way;
    and the Lord has laid on him
    the iniquity of us all.

    7 He was oppressed and afflicted,
    yet he did not open his mouth;
    he was led like a lamb to the slaughter,
    and as a sheep before its shearers is silent,
    so he did not open his mouth.
    8 By oppression and judgment he was taken away.
    Yet who of his generation protested?
    For he was cut off from the land of the living;
    for the transgression of my people he was punished.
    9 He was assigned a grave with the wicked,
    and with the rich in his death,
    though he had done no violence,
    nor was any deceit in his mouth.
    10 Yet it was the Lord’s will to crush him and cause him to suffer,
    and though the Lord makes his life an offering for sin,
    he will see his offspring and prolong his days,
    and the will of the Lord will prosper in his hand.
    11 After he has suffered,
    he will see the light of life and be satisfied;
    by his knowledge my righteous servant will justify many,
    and he will bear their iniquities.
    12 Therefore I will give him a portion among the great,
    and he will divide the spoils with the strong,
    because he poured out his life unto death,
    and was numbered with the transgressors.
    For he bore the sin of many,
    and made intercession for the transgressors.
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    It appears that the desires expressed are finally being brought out and the desire is to have Christianity tought in the schools.
    If it were to be comparative religion it might contain chapters as in "Comparative Religion" by Charles Kimball


    1 Comparative Religion: Who, What, Why, HowYou learn 12 common features found in all religions and begin gaining the foundation for broader inquiries about similarities and differences among Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism, including those that occur not only between faiths, but within the same one.
    2 Exploring Similarities and Differences: Following a brief overview of some prominent single-discipline attempts to explain religion's origins, you explore three broader frameworks for understanding: Rudolf Otto's The Idea of the Holy, Mircea Eliade's The Sacred and The Profane, and Wilfred Cantwell Smith's The Meaning and End of Religion.
    3 The Sacred, the Holy, and the Profane: Eliade's observations about how different religions distinguish between the sacred and the profane (ordinary) and assign sacred meaning to times, places, and objects come alive for you through examples drawn from several of those religions.
    4 Sacred Time, Sacred Space, Sacred Objects: Foundational religious leaders fulfill vital purposes in all religions. In the first of two lectures devoted to such sacred people, you learn the different roles played by figures like Confucius, Siddhartha Gautama (the Buddha), Isaiah, Jeremiah, Muhammad, Jesus, and Krishna.
    5 Sacred People—Prophets, Sages, Saviors: You explore some of the more familiar figures charged with carrying out essential functions and rituals in their religious communities and learn how their roles have evolved. You also encounter the shaman, a lesser-known figure found not just in tribal cultures but in the great world religions as well.
    6 Sacred People—Clergy, Monastics, Shamans: Symbols are how human beings communicate. This lecture reveals to you how different religions employ these essential tools, not only through "representational" symbols whose meanings must be learned, but especially through "presentational" symbols whose meanings are experienced on a deeper level.
    7 Sacred Signs, Analogues, and Sacraments: A religion's sacred stories are profoundly true to those who embrace them. One type—the creation story—is common to all religions, which have given us hundreds of such stories and myths. You learn their categories and the four functions they serve.
    8 Creation Myths and Sacred Stories: What happens when a religion's founding figures and first adherents are gone, and divergent views arise among later generations? By looking at the early history of Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam, you see how adherents of the three great missionary religions developed frameworks for sustaining their faiths.
    9 From Sacred Stories and Letters to Doctrine: In examining the processes by which authoritative scriptures of the three Abrahamic religions became fixed, you see common approaches and distinctive differences. And you learn that even within the same faith, differences persist over what constitutes authoritative texts and how to interpret them.
    10 Sacred Texts—The Bible and the Qur'an: The massive body of literature deemed sacred by Hindus and Buddhists can be as bewildering as the number of ways in which they are understood and used. This lecture gives you a demystifying guide to the major types of sacred literature.
    11 Sacred Texts for Hindus and Buddhists: Nearly all religions include some concept of divinity, each fitting into one of four distinct categories. But you quickly see that the lines of separation can be fluid, and the question, "What do we mean when we say God?" can be more provocative than you might imagine.
    12 Polytheism, Dualism, Monism, and Monotheism: You explore the rituals that mark key stages in life—birth, childhood, coming of age, marriage, and death—and see striking similarity across all religions, as seen in the rituals of baptism, bar mitzvah, Buddhist and Christian ordination, and funerals.
    13 From Birth to Death—Religious Rituals: In a lecture that may forever change your perception of Passover, Christmas, or noon prayers at the mosque, you learn how calendar-based rituals use sacred stories, time, space, and objects to fulfill important pedagogical, sociological, and psychological functions.
    14 Daily, Weekly, Annual Religious Rituals: At first glance, ancient practices involving animal or human sacrifice are shocking to modern sensibilities. An examination of ritual sacrifice reveals common understandings and outcomes and leaves you with new insight into why people—even today—engage in sacrificial rituals.
    15 Ritual Sacrifice in the World's Religions: Every religion is predicated on the notion that the world we experience is not ideal and tries to explain the nature and purpose of existence. This lecture provides a framework for the next five lectures, including a consideration of the universal problems of evil and injustice.
    16 The Human Predicament—How to Overcome It: Although Judaism, Christianity, and Islam share many roots, the three Abrahamic traditions approach the human predicament in different ways. This lecture offers you the chance to observe through a new lens the ways in which the three faiths approach issues like sin, sacrifice, and ultimate accountability.
    17 The Problems of Sin and Forgetfulness: Although Hinduism and Buddhism encompass hundreds of varying traditions, all address the "illusion of reality" as the predicament trapping people in the cycles of death and rebirth. This lecture explains this cyclical perspective and how it differs from the linear viewpoint of the Abrahamic traditions.
    18 Breaking through the Illusion of Reality: Are the goals of existence only otherworldly? Can any be experienced here and now? You learn that no matter how the different religions conceive of the afterlife, they are united in a shared understanding that ultimate meaning must be found beyond physical existence.
    19 The Goals of Religious Life: Religion provides four basic paths by which faithful followers may pursue the ultimate goals: the ways of faith, devotion, disciplined action, and meditation. This lecture explores the first two, using examples drawn from Christianity, Buddhism, and Hinduism.
    20 The Way of Faith and the Way of Devotion: Disciplined action is the most widely practiced path, shown to you here in the legal traditions of Islam and biblical Israel and the rigid Hindu caste system. You also examine disciplined meditation, a form of action practiced by Buddhists and Hindus.
    21 The Way of Action and the Way of Meditation: Virtually all religions include adherents whose religious practice centers on the mystical path. Here, perhaps more than anywhere else, the lines separating religions become blurred or erased. You explore several key commonalities and differences among Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist, Christian, and Muslim mystics.
    22 The Way of the Mystics: As religions begin to grow, structure becomes a requirement, whether for perpetuation, organization, or doctrinal clarification. You see how the first followers of the Buddha, Jesus, and Muhammad attempted to resolve challenges through institutional structures, as often borrowed or adapted as created anew.
    23 The Evolution of Religious Institutions: Your course concludes with a consideration of the ways people in different religions understand their particular experiences and traditions in the context of religious diversity. You see several examples of the positive and inclusive approaches that are now part of the 21st century landscape.
    24 Religious Diversity in the 21st Century As religions begin to grow, structure becomes a requirement, whether for perpetuation, organization, or doctrinal clarification. You see how the first followers of the Buddha, Jesus, and Muhammad attempted to resolve challenges through institutional structures, as often borrowed or adapted as created anew.
    23The Evolution of Religious Institutions
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    Where should we start, the second or third grade? Maybe we can start with one used in a class at Clear Creek Baptist Bible College The course name was "Religious Sects in America". The problem is that it is about the same.

    Ok, I'll admit that this would be a little too deep for a second or third grader so a new text would be required. What would you like to see included in this new text book?
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    jperry Wrote: Where should we start, the second or third grade? Maybe we can start with one used in a class at Clear Creek Baptist Bible College The course name was "Religious Sects in America". The problem is that it is about the same.

    Ok, I'll admit that this would be a little too deep for a second or third grader so a new text would be required. What would you like to see included in this new text book?
    No, all the above total nonsense posted by a lot of members gives a clear picture on how messed up we are as adults, let alone to try to teach little kids about things which we can not answer; what if the kid asks where is "god'? What does "he,it,she" look like? Where is "misses god"? etc.

    Therefore a big NO; I repeat my old message: We only confuse kids ; they may have been told other things at home

    Again more than"x"replies, which means common sense does not prevail in this country. It is all very simple schools are there to learn something useful; emphasis on "useful"; religion is not something useful, it does not provide a job or food on the table after the study is completed unless you want to work tax free in a church. The "church" thing you if you want to be indoctrinated can be done at anytime for free at the churches themselves, so why should I pay as a tax payer for something you can get elsewhere for free. So quite simple NO RELIGEOUS things etc. at schools AMEN
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    jperry Wrote: Where should we start, the second or third grade? Maybe we can start with one used in a class at Clear Creek Baptist Bible College The course name was "Religious Sects in America". The problem is that it is about the same.

    Ok, I'll admit that this would be a little too deep for a second or third grader so a new text would be required. What would you like to see included in this new text book?
    I feel God and I love the lord that I know, but we can get into trouble by teaching regliogn in school because we open all religous beliefs up. We need to teach religion at home. If we do, the beleive of God is in us and the movement will come through if we let it. This will spread out if we can express ourselves outside of public schools and into all of our life. I know schools are government, faith has to start outside at home.
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    The posts I placed were done in humor. I just wanted to bring out the point that those belieing that religion be taught in schools did not want religion taught, they wanted Christianity taught. At any rate we found that "the Born Again Christians" know as much about teaching religion in schools as they do about Christianity.
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    Death breeds desperation. But religion is no solution. The dying need counsellors that reconcile human beings to the fact that they will simply cease to exist.

    Because we are emotionally wedded to ideas of immortality, we need confirmation that we are too important not to exist beyond the grave. Millennia of religions pandering to, and profiting from, this emotional need have flourished and died. No-one today believes in Zeus or Thor. But humans are in constant search of plausible substitutes, however ludicrous they may be.

    Fact is that when you're dead you join other creatures as compost. That is the reality that needs to be taught in schools. That might help to improve educational accomplishment - ie make the best of it while you're here.

    The rest of the debate about religion in schools is pure politics.
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    No religion should be taught in any secular school, public schools that is, religion should be left to the parents and religious scholars and religious teachers, public schools should stick to the basic's of reading, writing and arithmetic , advanced learning should be delegated to the advanced course's, and again , no religious teachings, students needing answers to certain questions that they may have which might have religious overtones should be directed to that particular denomination.
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    I wouldn't worry about it. In a hundred years or probably much less, no-one will care apart from Muslims and Jews.. That is, if global warming or nuclear events or water resource wars don't get them first.

    A 2012 study by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life reports:

    "The number of Americans who do not identify with any religion continues to grow at a rapid pace. One-fifth of the U.S. public – and a third of adults under 30 – are religiously unaffiliated today, the highest percentages ever in Pew Research Center polling.

    In the last five years alone, the unaffiliated have increased from just over 15% to just under 20% of all U.S. adults. Their ranks now include more than 13 million self-described atheists and agnostics (nearly 6% of the U.S. public), as well as nearly 33 million people who say they have no particular religious affiliation (14%)."


    (In my country, 40% don't believe in religion and another 11% couldn't be bothered to answer the question.)
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    united majority


    I don't like to call myself an atheist because it somehow infers that we are equal.... and that as adversaries in this debate we both have solid evidence. Sir, I am a non-believer. You have no evidence in support of your claims,,,,, Big claims require big evidence.

    You want our schools pushing fairy tales....math and science...NO......mysticism.....yes

    Sir...as long as there have been believers,,,there has been athiests
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    Fact: When people say that religion should be taught in schools, what they really mean to say is "My religion should be taught in schools." Not anybody else's religion - just mine. If you try teaching religion that's different than my version, well that's just crazy, pointless, un called for. Unacceptable. That's the short story of a lack of tolerance. Religion comes in many, many, many, many flavors. Most don't even know about the other beliefs. That's why I stand by this. Religion is a personal thing that should be appreciated, enjoyed, and respected - privately. You shouldn't be selling it door to door like it was girl scout cookies, which like religion are over priced.
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    TJ Wrote: Fact: When people say that religion should be taught in schools, what they really mean to say is "My religion should be taught in schools." Not anybody else's religion - just mine. If you try teaching religion that's different than my version, well that's just crazy, pointless, un called for. Unacceptable. That's the short story of a lack of tolerance. Religion comes in many, many, many, many flavors. Most don't even know about the other beliefs. That's why I stand by this. Religion is a personal thing that should be appreciated, enjoyed, and respected - privately. You shouldn't be selling it door to door like it was girl scout cookies, which like religion are over priced.
    That's what believers don't get,,,,,,, I as a citizen also have beliefs. I don't have to respect any persons beliefs. they speak as if religion is "off limits". No sir, as soon as they bring it up publicly, its now open to scrutiny and criticism. Look what's going on with this gay agenda. I don't have to accept government indoctrination under any pretense. Homos don't affect my life one bit. Should they have equal protection???? Of course. But it stops there for me.