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post office is not broke


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    Here's the update from my 4/22 post:

    All three of Biden's nominees have been confirmed. One of the existing Democrats still supports DeJoy, but his term actually ended in December, so he will be replaced soon. As it currently stands, there are now 5 Democrats and 4 Republicans on the board, a mix that will remain the same after Ron Bloom is replaced.

    Soon, we may hear these words:

    "na na nana na na nana hey hey good bye"

    https://bipartisanreport.com/2021/05/13/senate-finally-takes-big-step-towards-termination-of-louis-dejoy/

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    This year, the Postal Service has returned to its traditional role of being the one thing in Washington that Democrats and Republicans can reliably agree on. It is heartening to see lawmakers from both parties lining up behind the Postal Service Reform Act of 2021 — legislation introduced in the Senate and House that would help bring the mail into the 21st century.

    Mr. DeJoy’s 10-year plan for the agency, announced in March, seeks to address the hemorrhaging of cash in part by raising rates and streamlining service, in some cases cutting back on hours and employees. On Friday the Postal Service announced that a first-class stamp would cost 58 cents, up from 55 cents, starting this summer

    An alliance of more than 80 national organizations, including the American Postal Workers Union, has put out a proposal to use the existing infrastructure in new ways — anchoring the expansion of broadband access in rural areas or checking in on elderly and disabled people for whom mail carriers are the only point of daily human contact. The alliance’s plan also includes expanding the provision of financial services, such as affordable check-cashing, which could be vital in underserved areas. A 2015 report by the Postal Service Office of Inspector General estimates that such services could provide meaningful assistance to 68 million Americans who either don’t have a bank account or rely on expensive payday lending programs to cash checks. The Postal Service is already the single largest provider of paper money orders nationwide, and it offered savings accounts to customers until the late 1960s. The inspector general’s report estimated that the expansion of such services would generate about $1 billion in new revenue annually.

    The bill would also put the Postal Service on firmer financial footing by removing a 2006 congressional requirement that the agency set aside large amounts of cash to cover the cost of employee post-retirement health benefits 75 years into the future.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/28/opinion/post-office-postal-service.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

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    As a retired rural carrier I can confirm that DeJoy was a disgrace to the Postal Service. The sooner he's gone the better.
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    One Good Liberal Wrote: As a retired rural carrier I can confirm that DeJoy was a disgrace to the Postal Service. The sooner he's gone the better.

    Please allow me to be the first to welcome you to the hub, we're always looking for new members to discuss politics.

    I have to say that when "most" new presidents come into office, they usually clean house by getting rid of the previous office holder's appointees. Biden is somewhat different in that respect, he has not let go of or "fired" the previous administration's cronies. I too will be glad when this postal employee is gone, what with at his direction, he deliberately slowed the US Mail in an effort to change the election results. He was never really taken to task for what he did. Oh, yeah, he testified before congress, but his feet were never really held to the fire.

    I'll be very happy when all of the holdovers from the last admin. are flushed out.

    Thanks for joining up, it's great to have you!

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    The History Channel reminded us today that the Postal Service has been around longer than our country, since is was established on this date in 1775.

    On July 26, 1775, the U.S. postal system is established by the Second Continental Congress, with Benjamin Franklin as its first postmaster general. Franklin (1706-1790) put in place the foundation for many aspects of today’s mail system.

    In 1753, Benjamin Franklin, who had been postmaster of Philadelphia, became one of two joint postmasters general for the colonies. He made numerous improvements to the mail system, including setting up new, more efficient colonial routes and cutting delivery time in half between Philadelphia and New York by having the weekly mail wagon travel both day and night via relay teams. Franklin also debuted the first rate chart, which standardized delivery costs based on distance and weight.

    In 1774, the British fired Franklin from his postmaster job because of his revolutionary activities. However, the following year, he was appointed postmaster general of the United Colonies by the Continental Congress. Franklin held the job until late in 1776, when he was sent to France as a diplomat. He left a vastly improved mail system, with routes from Florida to Maine and regular service between the colonies and Britain. President George Washington appointed Samuel Osgood, a former Massachusetts congressman, as the first postmaster general of the American nation under the new U.S. constitution in 1789. At the time, there were approximately 75 post offices in the country.

    *********************************************

    Louis DeJoy was confirmed as Postmaster General on June 16,2020. The position of Postmaster General is somewhat unique due to the fact that he (0r she) can only be fired by the Board of Governors. When is is fully staffed, the Board of Governors has 11 members, one of whom is the Postmaster General. In recent years, it had as few as 7 members.

    If you look at the website for the Post Office, you'll notice that have been some additions since Joe Biden took office.

    Douglas Tulino was confirmed as deputy Postmaster General in May of 2021.

    Anton Hijjar was confirmed in May of 2021.

    Amer McReynolds was confirmed in June of 2021.

    Ronald Stroman was confirmed in June of 2021.

    https://about.usps.com/who/leadership/board-governors/

    Trump called the Postal Service as a joke, and vetoed billions of dollars in aid as the agency was ravage by COVID-19.

    Joe Biden, in contrast, is a big fan of the Postal Service.

    relates to The U.S. Postal Service Finds a Champion in Biden, Despite DeJoy

    Although it's entirely possible that DeJoy will finally get fired, there are reforms in process that will save the organization even if DeJoy somehow manages to keep his job.

    While concerns about his allegiances dominated the headlines, the Biden campaign offered some concrete, if less noticed, proposals to help the Postal Service. It called for emergency financial relief. It also advocated maintaining six-day-a-week mail delivery and eliminating a requirement that the agency prefund its future retiree health benefits every year, which effectively drove it into insolvency as overall mail volume fell. Prefunding accounted for about half of the USPS’s 2020 losses.

    Although DeJoy’s detractors would prefer otherwise, the president can’t hire and fire the postmaster general. That’s up to the nine members of the Board of Governors, who are appointed by the president, subject to Senate confirmation. Four of the current six (as of February 2021) appointees are Republicans. Biden has the opportunity to tilt the board against DeJoy by filling three vacant positions with governors of his own - which he has now done.

    There’s no indication that Biden has DeJoy’s ouster in mind. When asked about it at a White House briefing on Jan. 25, spokeswoman Jen Psaki said, “We all love the mailman and the mailwoman. I don’t have anything for you on it.” Postal worker unions aren’t calling for DeJoy to go, either. They waiting for him to release a 10-year plan for the USPS that he’s been working on. “The jury’s out,” says Jim Sauber, chief of staff for the National Association of Letter Carriers and a member of the Biden transition team on the USPS.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-02-04/biden-looks-to-reform-the-usps-but-firing-dejoy-might-happen

    A while back, I predicted the DeJoy would be lucky to stay in his position for an entire year - and he proved me wrong.

    In my opinion, his longevity will be determined by two things:

    1) The details of the 10 year plan that he is working on and

    2) The passate of the USPS Fairness Act, which was introduced in the House of Representatives on 2/2/2021.

    https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/695/text?r=1&s=1


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    The U.S. Postal Service will pay $120 million over the next five years to a major logistics contractor that Postmaster General Louis DeJoy previously helped lead and with which his family maintains financial ties, according to DeJoy’s financial disclosure statements and a federal contracting database.

    The new contract will deepen the Postal Service’s relationship with XPO Logistics, where DeJoy served as supply chain chief executive from 2014 to 2015 after the company purchased New Breed Logistics, the trucking firm he owned for more than 30 years. Since he became postmaster general, DeJoy, DeJoy-controlled companies and his family foundation have divested between $65.4 million and $155.3 million worth of XPO shares, according to financial disclosures, foundation tax documents and securities filings.

    DeJoy obviously learned a few lessons from Trump, since he made a LOT of money renting rooms to foreign dignitaries at his Washington D.C. hotel.

    Postal Service spokesman Jeffery Adams said that DeJoy did not participate in the procurement process for the XPO contract, which was competitively bid. The DeJoy company leases to XPO were cleared by ethics officials before DeJoy took office in June 2020, according to a previously unreported Postal Service inspector general investigation, because the properties were rented to a contractor and not the agency itself. DeJoy is recused from any matters involving XPO, Adams said.

    DeJoy’s leases have alarmed some ethics watchdogs.

    “There’s no question he’s continuing to profit from a Postal Service contractor,” said Virginia Canter, chief ethics counsel at watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. “He can comply with these technical legal requirements … but it does create an appearance issue about whether it’s in his financial interest to continue to make policy that would benefit contractors like XPO.”

    DeJoy generally held commercial properties leased to XPO and shares in the company through individual limited liability companies and his family foundation, according to his financial disclosures, his wife’s financial disclosures and SEC filings. (DeJoy’s wife, Aldona Wos, was then-President Donald Trump’s ambassador-nominee to Canada, and filed separate ethics forms in 2019.)

    Even if all of transactions involving DeJoy are legitimate, his contracts with the Post Office create at least the appearance of a conflict of interest.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2021/08/06/usps-dejoy-xpo-logistics/

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    In politics, and in business, one hand washes the other, quid pro quo is so rampant in the USA, it's difficult and sometimes impossible to find out who is washing each other's hands. DeJoy is probably kissing some ass to keep his job.
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    that guy in AZ Wrote:

    This year, the Postal Service has returned to its traditional role of being the one thing in Washington that Democrats and Republicans can reliably agree on. It is heartening to see lawmakers from both parties lining up behind the Postal Service Reform Act of 2021 — legislation introduced in the Senate and House that would help bring the mail into the 21st century.

    Mr. DeJoy’s 10-year plan for the agency, announced in March, seeks to address the hemorrhaging of cash in part by raising rates and streamlining service, in some cases cutting back on hours and employees. On Friday the Postal Service announced that a first-class stamp would cost 58 cents, up from 55 cents, starting this summer

    An alliance of more than 80 national organizations, including the American Postal Workers Union, has put out a proposal to use the existing infrastructure in new ways — anchoring the expansion of broadband access in rural areas or checking in on elderly and disabled people for whom mail carriers are the only point of daily human contact. The alliance’s plan also includes expanding the provision of financial services, such as affordable check-cashing, which could be vital in underserved areas. A 2015 report by the Postal Service Office of Inspector General estimates that such services could provide meaningful assistance to 68 million Americans who either don’t have a bank account or rely on expensive payday lending programs to cash checks. The Postal Service is already the single largest provider of paper money orders nationwide, and it offered savings accounts to customers until the late 1960s. The inspector general’s report estimated that the expansion of such services would generate about $1 billion in new revenue annually.

    The bill would also put the Postal Service on firmer financial footing by removing a 2006 congressional requirement that the agency set aside large amounts of cash to cover the cost of employee post-retirement health benefits 75 years into the future.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/28/opinion/post-office-postal-service.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

    The Postal Service Reform Act was introduced in May. As of last Friday, it will has not passed in the House, but at least is has bi-partisan support.

    https://www.thecentersquare.com/opinion/op-ed-bipartisan-effort-on-postal-reform-will-deliver-fair-competition/article_315b4a1c-0cd1-11ec-81cd-bf70ce966d6f.html

    Shortly after Louis DeJoy became Postmaster General, the Parody Project released a video calling for his dismissal.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzxnNCOnXeA

    DeJoy is still the Postmaster General, but Biden has managed to shift the Board of Governors of the Postal Service to a group that will more likely remove DeJoy - but he is still there as of today. Until Ron Bloom is replaced as Chairman, though, it will be a challenge. Bloom personally recruited DeJoy, instead of heeding the recommendations of two different search firms. Bloom's term actually expired on December 8, 2020, but the board elected him as chairman on February 9, 2021.

    https://about.usps.com/who/leadership/board-governors/

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    I don't often agree with conservative authors, but on occasion, a guy that fits in that category makes sense. One example is a letter that appeared in the Washington Post this morning. It was published by Kevin Kosar, who is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Enterprise_Institute

    As you are aware, the Institute is a right-leaning think tank, but it HAS collaborated occasionally with the Brookings Institute, which is a liberal think tank.

    The American Enterprise Institute was founded in 1938, and has included come credible scholars over the years - as well as a few "whack jobs".

    I don't agree with everything Kosar published this morning, but at least some of his points make sense.

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/09/16/opinion/get-your-hands-off-post-office-everyone/

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    20 states have filed a complaint with the Postal Regulatory Commission over DeJoy's plan to raise prices and slow service.

    The Commission is separate from the Board of Governors, and it has always had a mix of Democrats and Republicans. Currently, there are 5 members, but only one (the Chairman) is a Democrat.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postal_Regulatory_Commission

    Ron Bloom, the guy that actually got DeJoy his job, was unanimously elected as chairman of the Board of Governors in February of 2021. Although Biden was able to add people to the board in 2021, I'm afraid that DeJoy's job is safe for now.

    https://about.usps.com/who/leadership/board-governors/ron-bloom.htm

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    Again it shows how "weak" Biden and the Dem's are; they should have tossed all the Trumpers out day one.

    Another "stupidity" is that Pelosi of all things, visited the Pope. It she "nuts" ? Doing so when the "abortion" game is on in TX and in other GOP run States as well. The refusal to have "separation" between "church" and State has not entered the indoctrinated "brains" here; neither Pelosi's brain. The Supreme Court is now also in the "hands" of the dangerous "right" as well the Catholics gained much more power in the government. The Government should be "neutral" related to that they should do an "earthly" job, without instructions from Mars. Due to that this country consists of just about all religions invented by "people" on this globe then stick to "earthly things" only, which is difficult enough. Or we prefer "ghostly" power grabs by these "church weirdo's, who don't even know that raising "unwanted kids" cost "social security" a fortune.