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well, you DO have to give Trump credit


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    Two articles in this morning's paper reminded me that we DO have to give Trump credit for some things, even though I disagree with the vast majority of the things that he does and says.

    The first article was written by a lady whose son was sentenced to life-in-prison without parole for a non-violent drug crime that he committed in his 20's.

    https://www.azcentral.com/story/opinion/op-ed/2020/02/19/trump-prison-reform-ross-ulbricht-commute-silk-road-sentence/4763198002/

    In December of 2018, Trump signed the FIRST STEP ACT, which made important reforms in prison sentencing. His signing of the bill was a prominent feature of his first Superbowl ad.

    The FIRST STEP ACT has a long and complicated history - and Trump was not always in favor of it. Rather than try to summarize it for you, I would encourage you to read the entire article (see below) in its entirely.

    https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/analysis-opinion/how-first-step-act-became-law-and-what-happens-next

    The second article was written by E.J. Montini, who compared Trump to JFK.

    https://www.azcentral.com/story/opinion/op-ed/ej-montini/2020/02/19/donald-trump-john-f-kennedy-charisma/4804141002/

    Few of us would admit that Trump has charisma - but he does. He is speaking tonight in Phoenix, and some people have been camping outside the venue where he will be speaking for as long as two days.

    "Charismatic individuals reach people on an emotional level. It is difficult to dissuade their followers with reason. With truth. They are loyal and forgiving. The Trump supporters I hear from just about every day feel as if they know him and, more importantly, that he knows them."

    In a way, Trump bears a similarity to Anastasio "Tacho" Somoza García, a long time ruler in Nicaragua. This is how FDR allegedly described him in 1939:

    "Somoza may be a son of a bitch, but he's our son of a bitch."

    The MAGA hat crowd would likely say the same thing about Trump today.

    https://www.democratichub.com/forums/553/default?em=nfp

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    Absurd.

    Why?

    Ask yourself if there were violent crimes committed by other persons while this offender's website or off the grid business dealings were committed.

    Here in Wisconsin, we had teenagers and young adults along with their mother operating a vape business out of the public eye, until good detective work crushed their illegal vape business and indicted a whole slew of people involved in it. The mother was running a real estate business as a front while illegal vape materials were being made and traded for money. Harmless you say? Maybe not if any people outside purchasing these items were harmed in any way.

    Blago, the former governor of Illinois had his sentence commuted from 14 years of prison to just 8, thanks to your hero Donald J., Blago was considered a shake down artist, which in essence what Donald is, he tried to shake down the leader of a foreign government, is that harmless?

    I watch The First 48 nearly every day, and when it comes to so called innocent victims in the drug trade, there's no such thing as a harmless crime. People are killed daily on the streets of America making drug deals on the streets, so we cannot say that any street drug trade is harmless. People are killed daily from making sales of privately owned items too through buying and selling apps.

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    AZ, yes it possible that Trump does some good for a few people, but I would argue that his purpose is 100% in his self interest. It is never done out of motivation to do justice or what is the right thing for the country, or even what is the right thing for someone else or group. It's always his interests as #1 and he is simply using people or situations for personal gain. Let take Rush Limbaugh getting the medal of freedom award. Nobody other than Limbaugh fans think he deserves it for spending 3 hour per day spewing hate over the airwaves. Trump gave the award to get Limbaugh off Trumps back. Limbaugh often was critical of Trump, almost daily; getting the freedom award is far far better than an cash bribe because Limbaugh is worth half billion dollars. Limbaugh got something that he could not have bought with all his money. Cost to Trump is zero.

    I don't say this out of hate for Trump, I say this because it is my perception that Trump has real mental illness problems that prevent him from having empathy for others, including his own family. Like a person who is tone deaf or color blind, certain things are impossible for Trump to comprehend or do. On top of that he is full blown pathological and and a sociopath.

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    What I will and have always given him credit for is having a message. Democrats sure don't have one unless quietly talking amongst themselves. That's why regardless of who the Democrats nominate.... Trump will be president for 4 more years after the November election. Dems are good intentioned and intelligent and undoubtedly a better choice for America but they don't know how to fight or win. R's will win big as dysfunctional Democrats blow another opportunity against the most beatable opponent in a generation.

    We need to one day talk to the citizens in all of those red states. It has to start somewhere and common ground can be found. We have to not fight the religious because they vote 100% of the time. Democrats have little to no chance. I wish it wasn't true but it is. Find common ground and communication is key. Winning the Northeast, the Northwest and California gets you the most votes but not enough if you lose the Plains states and the South. More votes but too few delegates is a losing formula. Mrs Clinton got the most votes. How have you enjoyed her presidency ?

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    It is absurd to think there are NO victims when a crime is committed.

    If a person deals in drugs for instance, someone might be injured either by the taking of the drug, a peddler or a buyer could be injured in a deal gone bad.

    The same goes for dealing in a real estate transaction, or in the politics of political horse trading, to coin that phrase I heard this morning from a news journalist.

    I read that the person in the article link posted here dealt with bitcoin, as far as I know, bitcoin is not legal tender and has not set monetary amount, therefore, one has to assume that bitcoin is absolutely worthless, and people shouldn't be using it in trade for products or services.

    In the old Beretta series, Robert Blake used to say if you can't do the time, don't do the crime, in Trump's case, he has upended the legal and justice systems.


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    Dockadams Wrote:

    In the old Beretta series, Robert Blake used to say if you can't do the time, don't do the crime, in Trump's case, he has upended the legal and justice systems.

    Trump's perspective is there there is no such thing as white collar crime, its all just part of doing business. There is only one way to keep score: who is the winner; all business practices are always valid. If one person can rip off another person, rip off the government, or rip off another business, he sees it as one side being smarter than the other.... He is just rationalizing that victims of white collar crime are just stupid people that can't manage their money or business.

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    that guy in AZ Wrote:

    Two articles in this morning's paper reminded me that we DO have to give Trump credit for some things, even though I disagree with the vast majority of the things that he does and says.

    The first article was written by a lady whose son was sentenced to life-in-prison without parole for a non-violent drug crime that he committed in his 20's.

    https://www.azcentral.com/story/opinion/op-ed/2020/02/19/trump-prison-reform-ross-ulbricht-commute-silk-road-sentence/4763198002/

    In December of 2018, Trump signed the FIRST STEP ACT, which made important reforms in prison sentencing. His signing of the bill was a prominent feature of his first Superbowl ad.

    The FIRST STEP ACT has a long and complicated history - and Trump was not always in favor of it. Rather than try to summarize it for you, I would encourage you to read the entire article (see below) in its entirely.

    https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/analysis-opinion/how-first-step-act-became-law-and-what-happens-next

    The second article was written by E.J. Montini, who compared Trump to JFK.

    https://www.azcentral.com/story/opinion/op-ed/ej-montini/2020/02/19/donald-trump-john-f-kennedy-charisma/4804141002/

    Few of us would admit that Trump has charisma - but he does. He is speaking tonight in Phoenix, and some people have been camping outside the venue where he will be speaking for as long as two days.

    "Charismatic individuals reach people on an emotional level. It is difficult to dissuade their followers with reason. With truth. They are loyal and forgiving. The Trump supporters I hear from just about every day feel as if they know him and, more importantly, that he knows them."

    In a way, Trump bears a similarity to Anastasio "Tacho" Somoza García, a long time ruler in Nicaragua. This is how FDR allegedly described him in 1939:

    "Somoza may be a son of a bitch, but he's our son of a bitch."

    The MAGA hat crowd would likely say the same thing about Trump today.

    https://www.democratichub.com/forums/553/default?em=nfp

    AZ, Shortly after Trump announced his candidacy in 2015 changing from keeping American labor cheap to lots of good paying jobs I made a prediction on this forum. I said he was charismatic and now was campaigning what should have been the Democratic battle cry “lots of good paying jobs”. I explained that the clinical definition of charisma was an unexplained compelling attraction that people have for an individual. People can’t help but like!!! Throughout the campaign I warned that attacking a charismatic person won’t work. All the way to the end. On Oct28, 2016 while Hillary was polling good and everybody thought Trump would win I said people were lying to the polls and Trump would probably win.
  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    wwjd Wrote:
    Dockadams Wrote:

    In the old Beretta series, Robert Blake used to say if you can't do the time, don't do the crime, in Trump's case, he has upended the legal and justice systems.

    Trump's perspective is there there is no such thing as white collar crime, its all just part of doing business. There is only one way to keep score: who is the winner; all business practices are always valid. If one person can rip off another person, rip off the government, or rip off another business, he sees it as one side being smarter than the other.... He is just rationalizing that victims of white collar crime are just stupid people that can't manage their money or business.

    I believe you're correct. The other side of that is Trump doesn't know the difference between what is right or wrong. I don't see the logic behind giving a radio show host that spews hate over the airwaves a freedom medal.
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    The thing is people here have to look at the "total" picture and not lift out a few things were the idiot guy may be got to be not so bad. Sorry this idiot never should have become President in the first place if you dig up his past. This is like an judge saying : Oh yeah, you murdered your wife, but you helped an old lady cross the street, so we don't find you guilty.

    Just let this country admit for a change that they voted for an "mafia" trained "criminal" without thinking, because they relied on the "system"; however the "system" is in shambles and does not work as the forefathers intended.

    Thus wake up America and "do" something, other than talk. Caucuses means nothing; neither Democratic in-fighting.

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    One of the speakers at the CPAC meeting this week was Alice Marie Johnson, whose life sentence was commuted by Trump in June of 2018 - before he signed the FIRST STEP ACT. She was also a guest of honor of Trump's State of the Union address on February 5, 2019, and she was also in his first Superbowl ad.

    What was not mentioned at the CPAC, of course, was that it was the efforts of DEMOCRATS (in part) who got her released. If you read her bio, it's easy to see why she became a drug dealer, the class of people most people in society say we should be tough on, and most people also say we should be easier on people who use recreational marijuana.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Marie_Johnson

    Here's how the Democrats got involved:

    In a subsequent memoir written after her release, Johnson wrote that she served time at the Federal Medical Center, Carswell, the federal prison hospital in Texas, where she became a certified hospice worker, and was subsequently transferred to FCI Aliceville to be closer to family. In letters supporting her bid for clemency, staff members at FCI Aliceville wrote that Johnson did not commit any disciplinary infractions during her incarceration at FCI Aliceville. Johnson participated in a pilot program, introduced in 2016 by Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates, that provided videoconferencing access to certain female federal prisoners. The program allowed the online publication Mic to record a video interview with Johnson that went viral and brought Johnson's cause to public attention. According to a profile from Johnson, she also used Skype while imprisoned to speak at Hunter College, Yale, and other audiences. During her time in prison, Johnson became an ordained minister, and credited her grant of clemency to divine intervention.

    Eventually, her case was taken up by the ACLU. Johnson's was one of the 16,776 petitions filed in the Obama administration's 2014 clemency project. Her application was denied just before Obama left office. In 2018, Kim Kardashian and President Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner sought to persuade Trump to grant clemency to Johnson, and he did. The Washington Post's Wonkblog described the pardon as somewhat surprising given Trump's past statements in favor of executing drug dealers?.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovqCXp7eHaY

    The most honest appraisal of this lady's situation is the both Republicans and Democrats should get credit for her release, and both parties should also receive blame for not releasing her sooner.

    Sally Yates, was fired by Trump on January 30, 2017, because she instructed the Justice Department not to make legal arguments defending Executive Order 13769, which temporarily banned the admission of refugees and barred travel from certain Muslim-majority countries. Rather than defend it, Yates stated the order was neither defensible in court nor consistent with the Constitution. Large portions of the order were subsequently blocked by federal courts, though the Supreme Court ultimately upheld a revised version.

    If Jeff Sessions, her predecessor, been in office instead of Sally Yates in 2016, it's unlikely that he would have instituted the video conferencing program that she put in place.

    In May of 2017, Sessions sent out a memo that he sent out to all federal prosecutors:

    "Stop seeking leniency for low-level drug offenders and start seeking the toughest penalties possible."

    That's what federal authorities used to do, when the war on drugs fueled the passage of mandatory minimum sentencing laws. But under former President Barack Obama, the Justice Department tried to rein in the use of those statutes, which advocates say were used disproportionately against minorities and led to massive prison overcrowding.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/attorney-general-sessions-charts-course-back-long-drug-sentences-n758866

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    For the record, I have never been arrested - but my son has.

    The article that I posted the other day (about the man who was arrested in D.C. in 1971) is a reminder that problems with the law can stay on your record for a very long time. In my son's case, it was more than 19 years.

    https://tohell-andback.blogspot.com/2012/09/go-directly-to-jail.html

    As I mentioned at the start of this thread, signing the First Step Act was one of the very few things that Trump did that was worthwhile.

    Far too many people are in prison for the use of marijuana, and states are gradually removing the penalties - and expunging their records.

    Joe Biden just announced that he is ending contracts with private prison companies at Federal facilities. Obama had done the same thing, but Trump reversed the decision (naturally).

    NBC provided a good summary of the details of the decision at the end of January.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/biden-s-order-terminates-federal-private-prison-contracts-here-s-n1255776

    Breitbart, naturally, had a different take:

    "Altogether, foreign convicts make up nearly 17 percent of the federal prison population, a total of more than 25,000, and most are from Mexico and Central America. Currently, nearly 14,000 of those foreign convicts are held in the privately-managed prisons contracted by the BOP.

    The 11 privately-managed prisons include nine that are operated by the GEO Group, including three facilities that are already set to close within the next few months. The eight remaining privately-managed prisons’ contracts are set to expire later this year and in 2022. Biden’s order ensures none of those contracts up for renewal will be renewed.

    Biden’s order “is a solution in search of a problem,” a spokesperson with GEO Group told Breitbart News in a statement:

    For more than three decades, our company has provided high-quality services under a private-public partnership with the BOP. During this timeframe, our facilities, which are newer and more modern than the generally older government-run prisons, have helped the BOP meet the significant overcrowding challenges facing the federal prison system.

    Our facilities have almost exclusively housed non-citizen criminal aliens convicted of federal crimes, thus allowing government-run facilities to care for U.S. citizens without significant overcrowding challenges.

    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2021/01/26/joe-biden-ending-contracts-private-prisons-holding-foreign-convicts/

    Financially, the Geo Group was already on shaky ground.

    The company's bottom line totaled $11.91 million, or $0.09 per share. This compares with $38.05 million, or $0.32 per share, in last year's fourth quarter.

    Excluding items, The GEO Group Inc. reported adjusted earnings of $39.25 million or $0.33 per share for the period.

    The company's revenue for the quarter fell 7.0% to $578.12 million from $621.71 million last year.

    https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/the-geo-group-inc.-q4-adjusted-earnings-of-%240.33-per-share-2021-02-16

    In August 2016, just after an Obama administration decision to stop contracting with for-profit private prisons sent its stock price tumbling, GEO Group, Inc., the country’s largest private prison contractor, donated $100,000 to a super PAC aligned with then-presidential candidate Donald J. Trump.

    Through a wholly owned subsidiary called GEO Corrections Holdings, Florida-based GEO Group, Inc. – whose $2.33 billion in 2018 revenues would have been threatened had Hillary Clinton won and continued Obama’s policy – then gave another $125,000 a week before the election to the Trump-aligned super PAC, known as “Rebuilding America Now” and chaired by Florida’s then-governor and current senator, Rick Scott. When Trump won, GEO Group stock quickly rose 21%, and it gave an additional $250,000 to his inauguration committee.

    https://www.prisonlegalnews.org/news/2020/apr/1/geo-group-largest-private-prison-contractor-cranks-political-contributions-during-trump-years/

    Since February of 2017, GEO Group has grown to become ICE’s largest vendor, holding contracts worth $471 million in total. Meanwhile, GEO Group and its subsidiaries have given $550,000 to the Republican Senate Leadership Fund, $325,000 to the GOP’s Congressional Leadership Fund, as well as $275,000 to the New Republican PAC, which supported Scott through his successful 2018 Senate campaign in Florida.

    The nonprofit Campaign Legal Center filed a complaint in 2017 with the Federal Election Commission (FEC), alleging GEO Group violated 75-year-old federal law prohibiting federal contractors from making political donations in order to influence federal law and policy in their favor.

    Meanwhile, a Super PAC formed in March 2019 to support the re-election of Maine’s U.S. Senator Susan Collins (R) released the names of its donors as required by law. One of them was GEO Acquisition II, yet another subsidiary of GEO Group. The Collins-aligned Super PAC, known as “1820,” the year Maine was admitted to the Union, has already spent some $700,000 on media ads in support of the 67-year-old senator, who faces a strong Democratic challenger this November in 48-year-old state House Speaker Sara Gideon, who has already raised $4 million in contributions.

    Although we would all like to have more Democratic senators, at least Susan Collins is a more centrist Republican, and has sided with the Democrats many times.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Collins