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Right Wing Wisconsin Judge Orders Purge Of 234,000 Voters

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    Judge orders state to purge more than 200,000 Wisconsin voters from the rolls

    msn.com/en-us/news/politics/judge-order...

    I didn't know that republicans were that desperate to reelect Trump.

    Of course his order will be appealed. This judge should be recalled, IMO.

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    One of the problems that every state has is how to remove people from voter registration lists who have died or have moved out of state. In Colorado, we have all mail-in ballots (with option to vote at polling stations). Mail-in ballots cannot be forwarded by the post office if they are undeliverable. They are "returned to sender"...the county clerk and recorders office. The person can then be placed on the inactive voter list if he/she still doesn't vote in the next election, but their registration will not be removed. The clerk and recorders office makes diligent efforts to update lists of voters who have moved by sending cards to the address, and if these too are returned as "not at this address" then they are flagged. They also have other means such as driver license verifications, etc. to cross check with other states.

    Being on the inactive list (not voting) for so many years and not verifying address will eventually get you purged.

    In Colorado, young people are the largest category of "inactives", many of them because they have moved. When I was canvassing for candidates in university district housing I knocked on so many apartment doors where someone else answered the door. The previous tenant, a college student, had moved on. However, this didn't mean that the person had left the state. He/she might have just moved apartments in the same city but failed to notify the clerk and recorders office.

    They might be alarmed that they were classified as "inactive", but they can still vote at early voting or election day polling stations by just showing up with an ID. I don't remember how many years they can remain on the inactive list before they are purged, but if a person is classified inactive for not voting in two consecutive general elections, and they do not respond to voter information cards sent by the clerk and recorders office to inactive voters, then yes they will eventually be purged. They can always reregister online. It only takes about two minutes.

    I cannot speak for other states, but if they have a process similar to that of Colorado's and purge a certain percentage of inactive voters each year, then I would not have any issues. It's a waste of taxpayers' money to be sending out ballots and ballot information to people who have either moved or "left society" and no longer care to vote. I met some of those as well who refused to vote calling the process fixed or crooked.

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    Schmidt, the problem is that no one who "mails" in his ballot gets an conformation that indeed such ballot is processed. Especially in FL I get the notion that it goes straight into the shredder (or gets "lost" somehow) ; I doubt that they are honest here. In FL all of this is very suspicious. Nothing lately is honest in this country.
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    Well in Colorado we can go online to check if our votes have been counted. Don't know about other states.
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    Although we now have two threads about the same topic, I'll all another comment to this one, since the arguments seem a little more balanced.

    I researched Paul Malloy to see if he had and conservative leanings, but all I found was that he has been a judge since 2002, and he has been an attorney for more than 20 years. Although we all need to be suspicious of voter purges, Schmidt succinctly summed up the process because sometimes there ARE valid reasons for removal of some voters from the rolls.

    Verifying the accuracy of voting lists has been an issue for a very long time. There have always been rumors that many deceased people in graveyards in Cicero voted for mayor Richard J. Daley in Chicago, even though there is no factual evidence to prove it.

    https://ballotpedia.org/Paul_Malloy:

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    that guy in AZ Wrote:

    Although we now have two threads about the same topic, I'll all another comment to this one, since the arguments seem a little more balanced.

    I researched Paul Malloy to see if he had and conservative leanings, but all I found was that he has been a judge since 2002, and he has been an attorney for more than 20 years. Although we all need to be suspicious of voter purges, Schmidt succinctly summed up the process because sometimes there ARE valid reasons for removal of some voters from the rolls.

    Verifying the accuracy of voting lists has been an issue for a very long time. There have always been rumors that many deceased people in graveyards in Cicero voted for mayor Richard J. Daley in Chicago, even though there is no factual evidence to prove it.

    https://ballotpedia.org/Paul_Malloy:

    Show the link to the other Wisconsin voter purge thread please......

    huffpost.com/entry/wisconsin-voter-purg...

    Here's the right wing connection you asked for: "Malloy was appointed to the bench in 2002 by Republican Gov. Scott McCallum."

    huffpost.com/entry/wisconsin-voter-purg...

    "The Journal Sentinel reported Democratic-leaning areas would be hit harder by the voter purge than Republican ones. On Friday, Wisconsin’s Democratic Gov. Tony Evers denounced the purge as a voter suppression effort. Wisconsin is the latest state with a Republican secretary of state to authorize a sweeping voter purge after Trump was elected."

    There's nothing to argue about, except republican lawmakers and their appointees seem to be setting up a pattern of voter suppression, if you'd like to argue that point. Unless you want to lay down and allow republicans to have it their way.

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    that guy in AZ Wrote:

    Although we now have two threads about the same topic, I'll all another comment to this one, since the arguments seem a little more balanced.

    I researched Paul Malloy to see if he had and conservative leanings, but all I found was that he has been a judge since 2002, and he has been an attorney for more than 20 years. Although we all need to be suspicious of voter purges, Schmidt succinctly summed up the process because sometimes there ARE valid reasons for removal of some voters from the rolls.

    Verifying the accuracy of voting lists has been an issue for a very long time. There have always been rumors that many deceased people in graveyards in Cicero voted for mayor Richard J. Daley in Chicago, even though there is no factual evidence to prove it.

    https://ballotpedia.org/Paul_Malloy:

    When I moved to Florida I registered to vote. I got a notification that I was still registered in the state I had come from. I had to cancel my previous registration to proceed. It's nice to see actual checks and balances.
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    Yes in Colorado when I was helping registering voters, the form required you to list your previous address as well as last four digits of your Social Security number. I assume then that the government officials checked the form to make sure the person was not doubly registered in another state or county. It is probably easy to check online now with most states having easy access to voter registrations of other states.

    Colorado also allows you to register to vote on election day at a designated place equipped to handle new registrations. Falsifying information on a voter registration form is a felony in Colorado.

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    In my opinion, this is just another step to alienate prospective voters. The REAL I.D. will be the law of the land soon, anyone that doesn't have it cannot even fly domestically, and I think there will be more coming after that, like a REAL I.D. to apply for housing assistance, food stamps, and other social entitlements, and I hate that word entitlements. Pretty soon, there'll come a day when you can't even drive a car without a so called real i.d., hell, why not just tattoo or bar code all of us!

    Why isn't a real i.d. a voter registration card too?

    At one time, I think republican run states wanted people to pay to register to vote, or to pay for just obtaining an i.d. card.

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    During last year's gubernatorial race in Georgia, Brian Kemp, who was the secretary of state at the time, beat Stacey Abrams by 1.4 percentage points. Since he was the official overseeing the election, as well as the candidate, he was able to successfully (but illegally) remove 340,000 voter registrations.

    https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/brian-kemp-340000-voters-748165/

    Georgia is at again this year. This time around, they plan to remove 300,000 names. Florida, of course, continues to be a problem as well.

    In September of this year, Ohio released the names of 235,000 names that it planned to purge. but a review of the names by the government and nongovernmental groups revealed that up to 20 percent of the names were there in error.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/30/us/politics/georgia-voter-purge.html

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    It appears that the weakness in the system of removing voters from polls is that it assumes that if a voter has not returned a postcard asking them to verify their address, that they have moved. Everyone receives so much junk mail now, that a post card from the Clerk and Recorder's office could easily be ignored. Also, for many young people who just change apartments but stay in the same city, those post cards won't do them any good because the post office is not allowed to forward them or the new tenant simply throws them out if they are delivered to the address.

    Still, the voter's name should not be purged, but simply reclassified as "inactive". But an inactive status that remains on the registrations for years and maybe decades because the person has not voted, has moved or died can result in more voters registered in a county than the numbers of population. That also gives rise to suspicions of people voting from their graves.

    U.S. Has 3.5 Million More Registered Voters Than Live Adults — A Red Flag For Electoral Fraud

    ... "some 3.5 million more people are registered to vote in the U.S. than are alive among America's adult citizens. Such staggering inaccuracy is an engraved invitation to voter fraud."

    "Judicial Watch's state-by-state tally and found that 462 U.S. counties had a registration rate exceeding 100% of all eligible voters. That's 3.552 million people, who Murdock calls "ghost voters." And how many people is that? There are 21 states that don't have that many people."

    "Los Angeles County, whose more than 10 million people make it the nation's most populous county, had 12% more registered voters than live ones, some 707,475 votes. That's a huge number of possible votes in an election."

    The problem is that the families of these voters have not informed the Clerk and Recorders office that they have died or moved on. And the effects can be cumulative over years. However, the Judicial Watch suggestion that people are "voting from their graves" I believe is bogus.

    According to the CDC, some 2.8 million Americas die each year, but that number includes young people below the voting age. In any case, it does not appear that there is a good mechanism to remove these dead people from voting registrations. If the counties are not doing yearly due diligence to remove dead people from the voting registers, their number can build up over many years ending up like Los Angeles County.

    Another 35 million Americans move each year, and unless they have advised their Clerk and Recorder offices that they have moved, then their names too will end up languishing on the voter registrations for that county as "inactive" for a while, but eventually purged if the person has not voted and no post cards are returned.

    I am not questioning that many voters registrations have been removed erroneously for people who have not moved. But I do wonder if the problem is somewhat overblown. I knocked on so many voters doors who were listed as 'inactive" and for those who answered the door, I often found an apathetic person who just didn't care about voting period. Some had every excuse in the book as I tried reasoning with them about the importance of engaging in our democracy.

    Democrats highlight "voter purges" by Republican Secretaries of State and always cite the huge total number, but as Arizona's post suggests maybe some 80 percent were legitimate and 20 percent were not. However, if that 20 percent is part of the apathetic "inactives", then maybe it doesn't make much difference in the final vote count on election day.

    Just an outside perspective from a "door knocker" each election year.

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    Schmidt:

    You've made a lot of excellent points.

    Although the Arizona legislature seems to come up with a lot of crazy ideas, they have adopted a procedure regarding ballots that actually makes sense. Just yesterday, I received a form form the country recorders office that would allow me to advise them of a change of address, or to be removed from the permanent early voting list. However, if there have been no changes, IT IS NOT NECESSARY TO RETURN THIS CARD.

    Obviously, this creates the other problem, where too many people (including dead ones) remain on the voting polls.

    Like many other states, Arizona allows people to either use mail-in ballots, or physically come to the polls. To my knowledge, New York is the only state that requires people to physically come to the polls to vote.

    The only way to make the voting system truly accurate is to establish uniform rules at the federal level, but I doubt is we will every see that in our lifetime.

    As of June 30, a total of 21 states allow same day registration:

    http://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/same-day-registration.aspx

    In addition to that, there is a wide disparity regarding the type of ID that can be use, ranging from none at all (13 states) to strict photo ID requirements (18 states).

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/ng-interactive/2019/nov/07/which-us-states-hardest-vote-supression-election

    The real culprit in our voting, though, is the 2013 Supreme Court decision that weakened the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which has disproportionally affected people of color.

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    Arizona's attempt at voter suppression just got shot down.

    Arizona violated the Voting Rights Act by barring voters from delivering the early ballots of neighbors, friends and others to polling places, a federal appeals court ruled Monday.

    The policy against so-called "ballot harvesting" disproportionately affects American Indian, Hispanic and African American voters, a majority of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said.

    Republicans who control the Legislature enacted the policy with the intent of suppressing turnout among voters from minority groups, the court decided.

    Attorney General Mark Brnovich said he will appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court as Arizona approaches what is bound to be a hard-fought election in which the outcomes of major races could hinge on a few thousand votes.

    I read recently that the natives in Arizona have recently adopted sophisticated technology to increase voter turnout. If they are successful, Trump would lose Arizona's 11 electoral votes. It's also been said that without those 11 electoral votes, Trump would not be able to prevail in the electoral college. Since Arizona is now considered to be a "purple" rather than a "red" state, the Grand Canyon state could be the nail in the coffin for the mob boss in the White House.

    https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/politics/elections/2020/01/27/arizona-ballot-harvesting-law-discriminates-minority-voters-ninth-circuit/4589610002/