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Yosemite Park - and the environment

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    In October 1, 1890, an act of Congress created Yosemite National Park, home of such natural wonders as Half Dome and the giant sequoia trees. Environmental trailblazer John Muir (1838-1914) and his colleagues campaigned for the congressional action, which was signed into law by President Benjamin Harrison and paved the way for generations of hikers, campers and nature lovers, along with countless “Don’t Feed the Bears” sign

    In 1864, to ward off further commercial exploitation, conservationists convinced President Abraham Lincoln to declare Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias a public trust of California. This marked the first time the U.S. government protected land for public enjoyment and it laid the foundation for the establishment of the national and state park systems. Yellowstone became America’s first national park in 1872.

    I'll admit that we already have a few threads about the environment, but there is a reason that I started a separate thread, because it illustrates how far backwards Trump and today's Republican Party have taken us.

    For starters, Trump has rolled back more than 80 environmental regulations, which makes him the worst environmental president in out history - and it started with his withdrawal from the Paris Treaty. The article below, from the Tribune Content Agency, goes into more detail:

    https://tribunecontentagency.com/article/the-worst-environmental-president-ever/

    The Grand Canyon is a national treasure, drawing millions of visitors from around the world to Arizona each year, and Congressman Paul Gosar thinks its a good idea to allow more uranium mining in the area around the canyon:

    ************************************************

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, U.S. Congressman Paul A. Gosar, D.D.S. (AZ-04) released the following statement after 27 Members of the House and Senate sent a letter to Assistant to the President for National Security Richard O'Brien and Assistant to the President for Economic Policy Larry Kudlow urging the revocation of the more than 1 million acre uranium withdrawal in northern Arizona:

    "Uranium is a critical component of America's national security apparatus, and energy needs. It defies common sense that America is currently importing nearly ninety-three percent of our uranium from countries with Russian influence. Too often, President Obama's Interior Department was used as a political tool in the war against American energy and rural communities. The Arizona Strip withdrawal is no different. Locking up millions of acres of land was a hallmark of the previous administration, but it doesn't have to be this way. Scrapping this political withdrawal will help secure our energy and national security needs."

    Background:

    Today, 27 Members of House and Senate sent a letter to Assistant to the President for National Security Richard O'Brien and Assistant to the President for Economic Policy Larry Kudlow urging the revocation of the more than 1 million acre uranium withdrawal in northern Arizona.

    In 2012, then-Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, imposed a 20-year mineral withdrawal of approximately 1,006,545 acres of federal mineral estate in northern Arizona from location and entry of new mining claims under the General Mining Law of 1872. Within this area are 4,204 acres owed by the Arizona State Land Department for the benefit of Arizona's school children as well as 19,789 acres of private land.

    Uranium is critical for nuclear power, the most reliable and clean, zero-emission energy source, as well as America's national defense apparatus.

    Revoking the withdrawal and replacing unfriendly and unstable foreign uranium sources with northern Arizona's vast quantities of domestic uranium is a national security priority, and will help achieve national energy independence.

    The letter's signatories include: Senators: Lisa Murkowski (AK) and Kevin Cramer (ND), and Reps: Paul Gosar (AZ-04), Robert Alderholt (AL-04), Jodey Arrington (TX-19), Andy Biggs (AZ-05), Rob Bishop (UT-01), Ken Buck (CO-04), Michael Cloud (TX-27), Paul Cook (CA-08), Scott DesJarlais (TN-04), Matt Gaetz (FL-01), Greg Gianforte (MT-At Large), Louie Gohmert (TX-01), Mark Green (TN-01), Jody Hice (GA-10), Steve King (IA-04), Doug LaMalfa (CA-01), Doug Lamborn (CO-05), Debbie Lesko (AZ-08), Tom McClintock (CA-04), Mark Meadows (NC-11), Markwayne Mullin (OK-02), Ralph Norman (SC-05), Pete Stauber (MN-08), Chris Stewart (UT-02), amd Scott Tipton (CO-03).

    ******************************************************************

    First of all, there are a couple of glaring problems in Gosar's letter.

    1) We actually don't need more nuclear power plans. The United States currently has 98 commercial reactors. Although there are currently 2 new reactors being constructed, 34 reactors have been shut down permanently. The United States is the world's largest producer of commercial nuclear power, and in 2013 generated 33% of the world's nuclear electricity.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_the_United_States

    Meanwhile, France plans to close 14 nuclear power plants by 2025, and will close the last 4 remaining coal plants by 2020.

    France relies on nuclear power for nearly 72 percent of its electricity needs, though the government wants to reduce this to 50 percent by 2030 or 2035 by developing more renewable energy sources. Macron said France would aim to triple its wind power electricity output by 2030, and increase solar energy output five-fold in that period.

    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-france-nuclear-reactors-macron.html

    Trump, of course, thinks that you won't be able to watch television if the wind isn't blowing, and he also thinks that windmills cause cancer.

    2) The United States currently has 6550 nuclear weapons, and Russia has 6800. However, Putin has said that he will develop more ground based nuclear weapons if we withdrew from the 1987 INF treaty - which Trump just did. Anyone who thinks that we need MORE nuclear bombs is f*****g nuts.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/12/05/here-is-how-many-nuclear-weapons-us-and-russia-have.html

    ************************************

    Remember that national treasure that I mentioned above?

    A Phoenix company wants to build two hydroelectric dams less than five miles from the eastern border of Grand Canyon National Park, submerging several miles of the Little Colorado River and the endangered fish habitat it protects.

    http://arizonarepublic.az.newsmemory.com/?publink=187691dd6

    Since two environmental groups sued this week to remove an EXISTING dam (the Glen Canyon dam), it's not likely that the two new dams are going to get approved.

    https://azdailysun.com/news/state-and-regional/environmentalists-push-for-removing-dam-along-colorado-river/article_5597def4-f977-50b7-87cc-d926d0a01006.html#utm_source=azdailysun.com&utm_campaign=%2Fnewsletter-templates%2Fnews-alert&utm_medium=PostUp&utm_content=45a94b82f74e4877b12ff5f0b84f4d821d8882aa

    ******************************************************

    It might surprise you to know that our country actually DID mine for uranium in the Cold War era right in the canyon itself.

    https://tohell-andback.blogspot.com/2012/09/a-nice-place-for-uranium-mining.html

    The origin of what eventually became known as the Orphan Mine dates back to a claim for a copper mine that was filed in 1893. Although copper was only mined for a couple of years, uranium eventually was mined at the location from 1956 until 1969, and a motel (the Grand Canyon Inn) operated near the mine site until 1966. Today, the location is considered to be a potential Superfund site, and millions of dollars have been spent so far in an attempt to determine the amount of contamination present at the site. As of 2008,the cost of remediation for the surface area of the mine was determined to be $15,000,000, and the cost to deal with contamination inside the mine and in a nearby creek (which drains into the Colorado River) is unknown.

    Let me repeat one significant fact.

    Abe Lincoln was America's first environmental president - and Trump is trying to take the country backwards more than 150 years.

    I'm looking forward to his removal from office,.

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    In my retirement, my wife and I have visited Yosemite as well as the Grand Canyon and many other national parks. For many of the parks the adjoining areas are also pristine. The Little Colorado River on the eastern edge of the Grand Canyon is just one example.

    I have a hard time understanding Trump's reasoning for his actions, many of which do not seem to even make economic sense. I just keep coming back to "spite". Trump hates the environmentalists and especially President Obama, and is on a mission to reverse every single environmental initiative of the Obama era. He wants no Obama legacy when he leaves office.

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    The same here I did visit all those parks as well. But yeah our stupid system here allows that Presidents can do whatever they want, because Jesus approves that. La la land for sure. I just wonder how this "island" will look like over 100 years.

    But yeah, who's doing something about getting "new" proper laws in this country which are adapted to the times and prevent corruption?

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    On Wednesday of this week, the House voted 236-185 Wednesday to permanently ban uranium mining on just over 1 million acres around the Grand Canyon, on a largely party line vote in which each side accused the other of fear-mongering.

    https://azdailysun.com/news/local/house-oks-permanent-ban-on-mining-million-acres-around-grand/article_f9baadab-e780-5e0b-ab70-c7c09496a0d1.html#utm_source=azdailysun.com&utm_campaign=%2Fnewsletter-templates%2Fdaily-headlines&utm_medium=PostUp&utm_content=45a94b82f74e4877b12ff5f0b84f4d821d8882aa

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    Trump continues to use massive distractions to take away our attention from the fact that he f****d up the coronavirus pandemic.

    The Trump administration rolled back ambitious Obama-era vehicle mileage standards today, raising the ceiling on damaging fossil fuel emissions for years to come and gutting one of the United States’ biggest efforts against climate change.

    The Trump administration released a final rule Tuesday on mileage standards through 2026. The change — after two years of Trump threatening and fighting states and a faction of automakers that opposed the move — waters down a tough Obama mileage standard that would have encouraged automakers to ramp up production of electric vehicles and more fuel-efficient gas and diesel vehicles

    https://news.yahoo.com/trump-rollback-mileage-standards-guts-151423701.html?.tsrc=notification-brknews

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    I guess he forgets that the rest of the world maintains these standards especially in Europe. Such will mean that export of US made cars will decline or stop to other countries who demand these rules and stringent emission standards etc.
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    Michael Mann, one of the most eminent climate scientists in the world, believes averting climate catastrophe on a global scale would be “essentially impossible” if Donald Trump is re-elected.

    A professor at Penn State University, Mann, 54, has published hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific papers, testified numerous times before Congress and appeared frequently in the news media. He is also active on Twitter, where earlier this year he declared: “A second Trump term is game over for the climate – really!”, a statement he reaffirmed in an interview with the Guardian and Covering Climate Now.

    Two years ago this month, scientists with the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change published a landmark study, Global Warming of 1.5 Degrees, which found that humanity had to cut heat-trapping emissions roughly by half by 2030 to avoid catastrophic climate breakdown. Headlines warned we had “12 years to save the planet.” Those 12 years are now 10.

    Except more than two years have been lost, because in that time, the Trump administration has prevented the world’s biggest economy from making “the dramatic reductions that were necessary to keep us on that path” of halving emissions by 2030, Mann says. “So now the incline is steeper. It’s no longer 5% [reductions] a year for the next 10 years. It’s more like seven and a half per cent.” (As a comparison, 7% is how much global carbon emissions are projected to fall in 2020 due to the Covid-19 economic lockdowns that shrank driving, flying and other carbon-intensive activities.)

    The numbers get unrealistically challenging if Trump gains another four years as president.

    https://www.ncronline.org/news/earthbeat/second-trump-term-would-be-game-over-climate-says-top-scientist

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    The Trump Administration just announced its plan to gut Roadless Rule protections in the Tongass National Forest. That means that more than 9 million acres of irreplaceable old-growth temperate rainforest will soon be open to clearcut logging and other exploitation with irreversible ecological damage. This is devastating.

    The Roadless Rule is one of the most popular conservation measures of the last century. And this news comes just weeks after the Trump Administration already rolled back regulations allowing oil and gas drilling in our national forests.1 Roadless areas stand as sentinels in the fight against climate change, and are some of our last great wild places. And at a time when forests are burning all over the world, the clock is ticking to keep the carbon and wildlife-rich Tongass National Forest intact.

    Nothing and no one should be able to destroy the few forests this country has left, which is why we need you to call on Congress to pass the Roadless Area Conservation Act to codify protections for our last remaining wild places.2 Almost 100 Representatives and 20 Senators have already signed on. Now is our best chance to use your voice and build the momentum.

    The Tongass is the nation’s largest national forest and covers most of Southeast Alaska, surrounding the famous Inside Passage and offers unique chances to view eagles, bears, spawning salmon, and the breath-taking vistas of “wild” Alaska. Hike or take a sled-dog ride on a glacier, stroll along boardwalk trails, fish in streams or the ocean, or relax at a remote cabin. If spying some truly wild wildlife is on your bucket list, visit the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center and Steep Creek Bear Viewing area in Juneau, Anan Wildlife Observatory in Wrangell, Fish Creek Bear Viewing Area in Hyder, or Pack Creek Brown Bear Viewing Area on Admiralty Island, or immerse yourself in native culture at the stunning Southeast Alaska Discovery Center, located just steps away from the cruise ship docks in downtown Ketchikan.

    https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/tongass/home

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    And you really think Trump will approve such just before he's in jail? Crazy country for sure!!!

    I hope these are still "plans" ; mental patients should never be allowed to approve this.

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    that guy in AZ Wrote:

    In October 1, 1890, an act of Congress created Yosemite National Park, home of such natural wonders as Half Dome and the giant sequoia trees. Environmental trailblazer John Muir (1838-1914) and his colleagues campaigned for the congressional action, which was signed into law by President Benjamin Harrison and paved the way for generations of hikers, campers and nature lovers, along with countless “Don’t Feed the Bears” sign

    In 1864, to ward off further commercial exploitation, conservationists convinced President Abraham Lincoln to declare Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of giant sequoias a public trust of California. This marked the first time the U.S. government protected land for public enjoyment and it laid the foundation for the establishment of the national and state park systems. Yellowstone became America’s first national park in 1872.

    I'll admit that we already have a few threads about the environment, but there is a reason that I started a separate thread, because it illustrates how far backwards Trump and today's Republican Party have taken us.

    For starters, Trump has rolled back more than 80 environmental regulations, which makes him the worst environmental president in out history - and it started with his withdrawal from the Paris Treaty. The article below, from the Tribune Content Agency, goes into more detail:

    https://tribunecontentagency.com/article/the-worst-environmental-president-ever/

    The Grand Canyon is a national treasure, drawing millions of visitors from around the world to Arizona each year, and Congressman Paul Gosar thinks its a good idea to allow more uranium mining in the area around the canyon:

    ************************************************

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, U.S. Congressman Paul A. Gosar, D.D.S. (AZ-04) released the following statement after 27 Members of the House and Senate sent a letter to Assistant to the President for National Security Richard O'Brien and Assistant to the President for Economic Policy Larry Kudlow urging the revocation of the more than 1 million acre uranium withdrawal in northern Arizona:

    "Uranium is a critical component of America's national security apparatus, and energy needs. It defies common sense that America is currently importing nearly ninety-three percent of our uranium from countries with Russian influence. Too often, President Obama's Interior Department was used as a political tool in the war against American energy and rural communities. The Arizona Strip withdrawal is no different. Locking up millions of acres of land was a hallmark of the previous administration, but it doesn't have to be this way. Scrapping this political withdrawal will help secure our energy and national security needs."

    Background:

    Today, 27 Members of House and Senate sent a letter to Assistant to the President for National Security Richard O'Brien and Assistant to the President for Economic Policy Larry Kudlow urging the revocation of the more than 1 million acre uranium withdrawal in northern Arizona.

    In 2012, then-Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, imposed a 20-year mineral withdrawal of approximately 1,006,545 acres of federal mineral estate in northern Arizona from location and entry of new mining claims under the General Mining Law of 1872. Within this area are 4,204 acres owed by the Arizona State Land Department for the benefit of Arizona's school children as well as 19,789 acres of private land.

    Uranium is critical for nuclear power, the most reliable and clean, zero-emission energy source, as well as America's national defense apparatus.

    Revoking the withdrawal and replacing unfriendly and unstable foreign uranium sources with northern Arizona's vast quantities of domestic uranium is a national security priority, and will help achieve national energy independence.

    The letter's signatories include: Senators: Lisa Murkowski (AK) and Kevin Cramer (ND), and Reps: Paul Gosar (AZ-04), Robert Alderholt (AL-04), Jodey Arrington (TX-19), Andy Biggs (AZ-05), Rob Bishop (UT-01), Ken Buck (CO-04), Michael Cloud (TX-27), Paul Cook (CA-08), Scott DesJarlais (TN-04), Matt Gaetz (FL-01), Greg Gianforte (MT-At Large), Louie Gohmert (TX-01), Mark Green (TN-01), Jody Hice (GA-10), Steve King (IA-04), Doug LaMalfa (CA-01), Doug Lamborn (CO-05), Debbie Lesko (AZ-08), Tom McClintock (CA-04), Mark Meadows (NC-11), Markwayne Mullin (OK-02), Ralph Norman (SC-05), Pete Stauber (MN-08), Chris Stewart (UT-02), amd Scott Tipton (CO-03).

    ******************************************************************

    First of all, there are a couple of glaring problems in Gosar's letter.

    1) We actually don't need more nuclear power plans. The United States currently has 98 commercial reactors. Although there are currently 2 new reactors being constructed, 34 reactors have been shut down permanently. The United States is the world's largest producer of commercial nuclear power, and in 2013 generated 33% of the world's nuclear electricity.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_the_United_States

    Meanwhile, France plans to close 14 nuclear power plants by 2025, and will close the last 4 remaining coal plants by 2020.

    France relies on nuclear power for nearly 72 percent of its electricity needs, though the government wants to reduce this to 50 percent by 2030 or 2035 by developing more renewable energy sources. Macron said France would aim to triple its wind power electricity output by 2030, and increase solar energy output five-fold in that period.

    https://phys.org/news/2018-11-france-nuclear-reactors-macron.html

    Trump, of course, thinks that you won't be able to watch television if the wind isn't blowing, and he also thinks that windmills cause cancer.

    2) The United States currently has 6550 nuclear weapons, and Russia has 6800. However, Putin has said that he will develop more ground based nuclear weapons if we withdrew from the 1987 INF treaty - which Trump just did. Anyone who thinks that we need MORE nuclear bombs is f*****g nuts.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/12/05/here-is-how-many-nuclear-weapons-us-and-russia-have.html

    ************************************

    Remember that national treasure that I mentioned above?

    A Phoenix company wants to build two hydroelectric dams less than five miles from the eastern border of Grand Canyon National Park, submerging several miles of the Little Colorado River and the endangered fish habitat it protects.

    http://arizonarepublic.az.newsmemory.com/?publink=187691dd6

    Since two environmental groups sued this week to remove an EXISTING dam (the Glen Canyon dam), it's not likely that the two new dams are going to get approved.

    https://azdailysun.com/news/state-and-regional/environmentalists-push-for-removing-dam-along-colorado-river/article_5597def4-f977-50b7-87cc-d926d0a01006.html

    ******************************************************

    It might surprise you to know that our country actually DID mine for uranium in the Cold War era right in the canyon itself.

    https://tohell-andback.blogspot.com/2012/09/a-nice-place-for-uranium-mining.html

    The origin of what eventually became known as the Orphan Mine dates back to a claim for a copper mine that was filed in 1893. Although copper was only mined for a couple of years, uranium eventually was mined at the location from 1956 until 1969, and a motel (the Grand Canyon Inn) operated near the mine site until 1966. Today, the location is considered to be a potential Superfund site, and millions of dollars have been spent so far in an attempt to determine the amount of contamination present at the site. As of 2008,the cost of remediation for the surface area of the mine was determined to be $15,000,000, and the cost to deal with contamination inside the mine and in a nearby creek (which drains into the Colorado River) is unknown.

    Let me repeat one significant fact.

    Abe Lincoln was America's first environmental president - and Trump is trying to take the country backwards more than 150 years.

    I'm looking forward to his removal from office,.

    One minor problem with the assertion regarding 93% of our uranium needs coming from Russia or countries under Russian influence. It is a lie. 52% comes from 3 sources: our own, Canada (the largest import source) and Australia.