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    I don't hear anybody calling for investing in jobs producing ventures and penalizing money draining trading. Wall Street is at the head of the river and damming the river up starving everybody down stream. I believe the Sherman Anti Trust Act could be employed to break up billions of dollars held in reserve to secure derivative trading. There will never be prosperity unless money is put back into the economy making products to sell. A $15 dollar minimum wage has to come from an increasing GDP.

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    Sheesh. There you go again.
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    Show me a business whose central goal is "job producing" and not profits and I'll show you a business that likely went bankrupt. Of course if you were in China, they have all kinds of "job producing ventures".

    Wired: The Unreal, Eerie Emptiness of China's 'Ghost Cities'

    "The Kangbashi district of Ordos, China is a marvel of urban planning, 137-square miles of shining towers, futuristic architecture and pristine parks carved out of the grassland of Inner Mongolia. It is a thoroughly modern city, but for one thing: No one lives there.

    "Well, almost nobody. Kangbashi is one of hundreds of sparkling new cities sitting relatively empty throughout China, built by a government eager to urbanize the country but shunned by people unable to afford it or hesitant to leave the rural communities they know..."

    These are what I would call, "job producing ventures" where the primary goal is employment. So Chet, should the USA be like China?

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    NEVER SAID A THING ABOUT PROFIT. Never said a thing about profit.

    Never mentioned the word profit.

    I have defended capitalism to Dutch on this forum. I stated that is the only way to get things done. I have stated that it is abused. I want the country to go back to when stocks were valued for earnings and growth. It is impossible to get startup money from the stockmarket. An IPO has to be an established billion dollar company. There is no opportunity in the stock market since the Commodities Futures Modernization Act that you defend had sucked all the startup money out of the economy.

    Now go back and read my post and try and respond to what I said.

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    Schmidt changes the topic with "These are what I would call, "So Chet, should the USA be like China?"

    No Schmidt the USA shouldn't be like the right wing response "like China".

    The USA should be like the USA that provided living wage jobs. Like before the CFMA drained money and put people out of work.

    How Congress Rushed a Bill that Helped Bring the Economy to Its Knees | HuffPost

    HuffPost › entry


    May 11, 2009 · And now, your case study: the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000. In the waning days of the 106th ...

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    Schmidt:

    I CAN show you a business whose main goal is job creation, not profit.

    Not surprisingly, it's a business that was started by an immigrant, and 30% of the employees are refugees.

    The founder of the company recently spoke at a TED conference, and he owns a company that makes yogurt.

    A LOT of yogurt.

    The first part of the article below is about a guy who represents diversity in outrsociety, since his dad is African American, his mother is Asian, and his kids are part Scandinavian. He also has played golf with Donald Trump, and he just won his 5th Masters.

    Chobani was started by an immigrant from Turkey, who bought a derelict Kraft food plant using money obtained from a Small Business Loan.

    Today, he is worth $1.7 billion, and his company employs 2000 workers.

    http://tohell-andback.blogspot.com/2019/04/the-audacity-of-hope.html

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    In the UK, such corporate surpluses stand at over £60bn, around 5% of the size of the economy. This money could be used to kickstart growth. Yet it is mostly standing idle. The result is paralysis.