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The National Popular Vote project

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    The "National Popular Vote" project is a brilliant way of rendering the Electoral College results moot without going through the painstaking process of amending the Constitution. It requires the state legislatures to pass laws requiring that the state cast all their electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote. The Colorado legislature recently passed the law and the governor is expected to sign it. Colorado will join California, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington state.

    From USA Today, "the National Popular Vote project, which began in 2006, in effect renders the Electoral College moot, eliminating any chance that a candidate can win the presidency without winning the popular vote nationally....The compact kicks in as soon as it is adopted by states possessing a combined 270 electoral votes, or a majority of the 538 electoral votes.

    "Colorado's nine electoral votes will join 10 other states, one commonwealth and one district for a total of 181 electoral votes, 89 votes short of becoming binding."

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    From the National Popular Vote website above,

    "It has passed at least one house in 11 additional states with 89 electoral votes (AR, AZ, CO, DE, ME, MI, NC, NM, NV, OK, OR) and has been approved unanimously by committee votes in two additional states with 26 electoral votes (GA, MO).

    "The bill has recently been passed by a 40–16 vote in the Republican-controlled Arizona House, 28–18 in Republican-controlled Oklahoma Senate, 57–4 in Republican-controlled New York Senate, 34-23 in Democratic-controlled Oregon House, and 26-16 in the New Mexico Senate."

    Republican support is essential to ultimately getting the compact approved, but getting the last few states may be more difficult. Even if state legislatures pass the bills, the governors would still need to sign it.

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    Schmidt Wrote:

    From the National Popular Vote website above,

    "It has passed at least one house in 11 additional states with 89 electoral votes (AR, AZ, CO, DE, ME, MI, NC, NM, NV, OK, OR) and has been approved unanimously by committee votes in two additional states with 26 electoral votes (GA, MO).

    "The bill has recently been passed by a 40–16 vote in the Republican-controlled Arizona House, 28–18 in Republican-controlled Oklahoma Senate, 57–4 in Republican-controlled New York Senate, 34-23 in Democratic-controlled Oregon House, and 26-16 in the New Mexico Senate."

    Republican support is essential to ultimately getting the compact approved, but getting the last few states may be more difficult. Even if state legislatures pass the bills, the governors would still need to sign it.

    Yes , it would be an "small" step in the right direction; however the "corrupt States like Florida, as well the "red" States will object. Thus it should be "mandated" in all States.