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Gillette's #MeToo Ad Exemplifies Everything I Hate About Advertising

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    Gillette's advertisement that may (or may not) air during Superbowl LIII calling on men to be "the best a man can get" encapsulates everything I hate about mass advertising in just under two minutes. And that's saying something because there's a whole lot of terrible advertising inundating our airwaves all hours of the day.

    I'm as "woke" as it gets when it comes to our hyper masculinized culture and don't disagree with the moral of Gillette's advertisement, but one thing I can't stand is a multi-billion dollar company heroically "taking a stand" on something while at the same time blatantly trying to sell a product. I'd be far more likely to believe Gillette actually cared about men being "the best they can get" if, instead of spending millions of dollars on a Super Bowl commercial to sell their product, they quietly spent that money supporting parenting and mentor programs that teach young boys to become decent human beings.

    It's entirely possible that I'm going overboard with my criticism, but I just can't help but get frustrated when multi-billion dollar companies hijack the critical issues of the day and turn them into ways to pad their bottom line.

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    Gillette's business plan for the last 70 plus year has been to increase the cost per shave. As explained by my college economics professor Gillette can't make people shave more often so to make more money Gillette has to increase the cost per shave. For more than a half century Gillette has used advertising to continually raise the cost per shave.

    jaredsxtn said: "I'd be far more likely to believe Gillette actually cared about men being "the best they can get""

    I'd believe Gillette cared if they had a product that reflected something from 117 years of being in the business. Like one standard handle that held any cartridge and a price that reflected improvements in technology.

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    The pricing of any product is based less on the cost to produce the product and more on the market conditions, advertising and consumer "feelings". While I find about 90 percent of the ads on TV unappealing, I can appreciate that they are tapping the emotions of select audiences. I admit that I find so many ads just plain stupid, but maybe that's just me. I'm an internet shopper and read product reviews rather than succumb to ads. I think that is more and more the trend.

    The Gillette ad taps the emotions, e.g. manliness of a select audience, so it is effective. Similarly, just look at all the ads for insurance companies, pharmaceuticals, automobiles, cell phones, sports gear, soft drinks, etc. They all appeal to some aspect of one's emotions rather than a critical assessment of the product itself. However, I don't know about those ads about "erectile disfunction" and such. Why are they even allowed?

    At least the Old Milwaukee Swedish Bikini Team ads are no longer aired, but while they aired they were effective until public pressure stopped them...changing times. I admit to like watching them.

    Oh but sex sells. Bring on the Super Bowl ads!

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    The most creative and talented artists work in advertising, and aside from the top 1% in the entertainment industry, they earn incredibly high incomes. Purest call them "sell outs" or whoring their talents to sell sugar water with food coloring, or in this case men's products.
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    jaredsxtn Wrote:

    instead of spending millions of dollars on a Super Bowl commercial to sell their product, they quietly spent that money supporting parenting and mentor programs that teach young boys to become decent human beings.

    And if they'd did, we'd likely never know and assume they were doing nothing beyond making money.

    I get your point, the companies real motivation might be to ride the wave of pop culture to create an image of their company that is false. In other words, if they didn't see a financial benefit they would not be doing it.


    I should say, that occasionally shows like 60 minutes, CBS Sunday Morning, and local news do point out companies that try to make a real difference without trying to turn their efforts into a marketing campaign. Some times it as simple as a company making the decision to only use recycle products.

    The late great Steve Jobs was against Apple matching their employee's donations to non-profits. One of the first acts of Tim Cook as CEO was to put that into place. That was a blip on the news radar for less than a day.

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    Schmidt Wrote:

    The pricing of any product is based less on the cost to produce the product and more on the market conditions, advertising and consumer "feelings". While I find about 90 percent of the ads on TV unappealing, I can appreciate that they are tapping the emotions of select audiences. I admit that I find so many ads just plain stupid, but maybe that's just me. I'm an internet shopper and read product reviews rather than succumb to ads. I think that is more and more the trend.

    The Gillette ad taps the emotions, e.g. manliness of a select audience, so it is effective. Similarly, just look at all the ads for insurance companies, pharmaceuticals, automobiles, cell phones, sports gear, soft drinks, etc. They all appeal to some aspect of one's emotions rather than a critical assessment of the product itself. However, I don't know about those ads about "erectile disfunction" and such. Why are they even allowed?

    At least the Old Milwaukee Swedish Bikini Team ads are no longer aired, but while they aired they were effective until public pressure stopped them...changing times. I admit to like watching them.

    Oh but sex sells. Bring on the Super Bowl ads!

    The effect of the Old Milwaukee "it doesn't get any better than this" is a qualification used almost universally .