Forum Thread

The Cost of Urbanization

Reply to ThreadDisplaying 3 Posts
  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        

    Emily Badger has an interesting article in the New York Times:

    Happy New Year! May Your City Never Become San Francisco, New York or Seattle...Or Portland, Denver, Boston, Dallas, Houston or Los Angeles.

    These are all prosperous high growth cities, but the price of that growth has meant a changing demographics of richer and poorer. "San Francisco has come to stand for the most specific set of horrors. It is the place where extreme poverty and tech wealth occupy the same block, while the schoolteachers and firefighters all live two hours away."

    "In Portland, Oakland and Sacramento, residents and pundits have voiced dread at becoming The Next San Francisco, where the middle class is disappearing."

    "Our deepest anxieties about the future of where we live are embodied in other cities — in Portlandification, Brooklynification, Manhattanization. The comparison is seldom a compliment. You don’t want to become Manhattan (too dense), Portland (too twee), Boston (too expensive), Seattle (too tech-y), Houston (too sprawling), Los Angeles (too congested), Las Vegas (too speculative), Chicago (too indebted)."

    The problem is not confined to the USA. Major cities round the globe have become victims of their own prosperity --manifesting itself in higher rents, longer commutes, and just a lower quality of life for those who do not share directly in the prosperity of their downtown areas.

    In Cape Town where I spent two months this fall, the major highways into the city are gridlocked every morning and afternoon. The solution for Cape Town (in part) though is office blocks going up in the suburbs where many of the employees live. However, these middle class suburbs are also unaffordable to the many manual laborers and others who still have to commute everyday into their places of work.

  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        

    these middle class suburbs are also unaffordable to the many manual laborers and others who still have to commute everyday into their places of work.

    More modern public transportation is probably 25 to 30 years behind the times. We notice that every day when the rush hour traffic reports air on our local TV stations, just gridlock, and the cost of the commute is ridiculous.

  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Dockadams Wrote:

    these middle class suburbs are also unaffordable to the many manual laborers and others who still have to commute everyday into their places of work.

    More modern public transportation is probably 25 to 30 years behind the times. We notice that every day when the rush hour traffic reports air on our local TV stations, just gridlock, and the cost of the commute is ridiculous.

    Yes Dock; this country (thus also S. Africa) is lacking infrastructure, like high speed rail. Over in Europe you can get anywhere you want with public transportation; this country is still in the stone age. In France they had the TGV already for more than 20 years. Here in FL there is not even an "old train" to get you from Ft. Myers to Tampa or Orlando. Edison and Ford built an railroad track but it is no longer used. There is not even an "metro" here; yes there is "bus" service "once" a day for the poor with just an old wooden bench along the road, hoping the bus stops or shows up. America is "nr 1" in the world?, Don't let me laugh!! Let's built a "wall" with a "train" on top!! Ha Ha.