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Elevated Radon Levels Found at CA Woolsey Fire Near Nuclear Meltdown

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    I've been researching this since, I have family in SoCal and I never even knew that there was a nuclear meltdown outside of LA let alone, it releasing toxic ash from this fire!

    There's all types of chemicals that were burnt up during the Woolsey Fire and this 1 article says that they've found elevated Radon at the site (which kills almost as many people per year as cig smoking).

    http://www.lancasterweeklyreview.com/woolsey-fire-radiation-toxic-testing

    Here's another link with some history on the meltdown that happened and subsequent cover-up. Its from the 1970's I think and the style of dress is amazing.

    youtube.com/watch?v=44gDy9iUc7k

    I just can't believe they never cleaned any of this up and in LA of all places.

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    I don't know what an acceptable "clean" level of radon is, and as the article states, the radon levels will change quickly. It depends on how long you are exposed and at what levels. However, radon has a half life of 3.8 days (compared to uranium at 4.4 billion years).

    Radon occurs naturally and is almost everywhere. From the following article:

    Radon Safe Levels

    "Radon gas is a naturally-occurring byproduct of the radioactive decay of Uranium in the soil. Depending on your geographic location, the radon levels of the air you breathe outside of your home may be as high as 0.75 pCi/L. The national average of outside radon levels is 0.4 pCi/L and it is estimated by the National Academy of Sciences that outdoor radon levels cause approximately 800 of the 21,000 radon induced lung cancer deaths in the US each year. Your risk of lung cancer increases substantially with exposure to higher radon levels. Lung cancer risk rises 16% per 2.7 pCi/L increase in radon exposure."

    I don't know how those number units correlate to the exposure rate units in the Woolsey fire article.