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Quirk of fate

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    Chet Ruminski Wrote:

    Dockadams said:

    "To post a comment from a conservative rag I wouldn't care to wipe anyone's ass with and a commentator hosted from that rag who is a conservative to say the least, is quite unbelievable."

    It wasn't a comment from the Tribune. It was the reprint of the progressive Super Pac Priorities USA about why Hillary lost the election. So again what is your point???...????

    Tribune states otherwise, please post a link from the super pac you're referencing.

    From the Trib:

    Marc A. Thiessen Special to the Washington Post | Washington

    From the Trib:

    Marc Thiessen writes a weekly column for The Post on foreign and domestic policy and contributes to the PostPartisan blog. He is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and the former chief speechwriter for President George W. Bush.

  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Dockadams Wrote:
    Chet Ruminski Wrote:

    Dockadams said:

    "To post a comment from a conservative rag I wouldn't care to wipe anyone's ass with and a commentator hosted from that rag who is a conservative to say the least, is quite unbelievable."

    It wasn't a comment from the Tribune. It was the reprint of the progressive Super Pac Priorities USA about why Hillary lost the election. So again what is your point???...????

    Tribune states otherwise, please post a link from the super pac you're referencing.

    From the Trib:

    Marc A. Thiessen Special to the Washington Post | Washington

    From the Trib:

    Marc Thiessen writes a weekly column for The Post on foreign and domestic policy and contributes to the PostPartisan blog. He is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and the former chief speechwriter for President George W. Bush.

    Not sure what you need to see to prove that Priorities USA is not a conservative facade perpetuated by the Tribune but here goes:

    It has been a long, knock-down drag-out battle, but the ugly intramural conflict over why Clinton lost to Trump is finally over. New polls and focus groups conducted by Clinton’s own SuperPAC Priorities USA shows that while racism and sexism had some effect, the main driver of Trump’s victory was economic anxiety, after all. The data showed that voters who switched from Obama to Trump had seen their standards of living decline and felt that the Democratic Party had become the party of the wealthy and unconcerned about their plight.

    washingtonmonthly.com/2017/05/06/the-ar...

    wealthy and big corporations know they have Donald Trump in their corner to fight for their priorities. We are helping build a powerful progressive movement that informs, energizes, and empowers average Americans to fight and win for their priorities in 2017, 2018, and 2020.

    Priorities USA Action Outside Spending | ...

    OpenSecrets.org › outsidespending › detail


    Priorities USA Action. Summary · Donors ... SUPER PAC Supports: Hillary Clinton (D) ... $411,406 spent opposing 1 candidates who lost"

    Priorities USA Action

    Image result for what is priorities usa

    Priorities USA Action is the largest Democratic Party super PAC. Founded in 2011, it supported Barack Obama's 2012 re-election campaign. ... The top six donors to the super PAC have given $43.5 million, which is a third of the money collected by Priorities USA Action in the 2016 election cycle. Wikipedia

    Founder: Bill Burton

    Affiliation: Democratic Party

    Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

    The Washington Post

    Democracy Dies in Darkness

    The Plum Line Opinion

    Why did Trump win? New research by Democrats offers a worrisome answer.

    By Greg SargentMay 1, 2017Email the author

    A look at President Trump’s first six months in office

    View Photos

    Scenes from the Republican’s beginning months in the White House.

    As the Democratic Party rebuilds itself for the 2018 and 2020 elections, Democratic strategists have been preoccupied with a pressing question: Why did so many voters who backed Barack Obama in 2012 switch to Donald Trump four years later, and what can be done to win them back?

    Top Democratic pollsters have conducted private focus groups and polling in an effort to answer that question, and they shared the results with me.

    One finding from the polling stands out: A shockingly large percentage of these Obama-Trump voters said Democrats’ economic policies will favor the wealthy — twice the percentage that said the same about Trump. I was also permitted to view video of some focus group activity, which showed Obama-Trump voters offering sharp criticism of Democrats on the economy.

    [How Trump makes it impossible for Republicans to win policy debates]

    Priorities USA, the super PAC that is working to restore Democrats to power, conducted focus groups of Obama-Trump voters in Wisconsin and Michigan — two states that Trump snatched from Democrats — in late January and polled some 800 Obama-Trump voters nationally at around the same time. The pollsters also conducted focus groups with so-called drop-off voters — people who voted for Obama in 2012 but didn’t vote in 2016 — in the same states and polled 800 drop-off voters nationally.

    Clinton describes struggles after election loss

    Hillary Clinton said all she wanted to do was to "curl up with a good book or our dogs" after her loss to Donald Trump. (Reuters)

    “[Hillary] Clinton and Democrats’ economic message did not break through to drop-off or Obama-Trump voters, even though drop-off voters are decidedly anti-Trump,” Priorities USA concluded in a presentation of its polling data and focus group findings, which has been shown to party officials in recent days.

    The poll found that Obama-Trump voters, many of whom are working-class whites and were pivotal to Trump’s victory, are economically losing ground and are skeptical of Democratic solutions to their problems. Among the findings:

    • 50 percent of Obama-Trump voters said their incomes are falling behind the cost of living, and another 31 percent said their incomes are merely keeping pace with the cost of living.
    • A sizable chunk of Obama-Trump voters — 30 percent — said their vote for Trump was more a vote against Clinton than a vote for Trump. Remember, these voters backed Obama four years earlier.
    • 42 percent of Obama-Trump voters said congressional Democrats’ economic policies will favor the wealthy, vs. only 21 percent of them who said the same about Trump. (Forty percent say that about congressional Republicans.) A total of 77 percent of Obama-Trump voters said Trump’s policies will favor some mix of all other classes (middle class, poor, all equally), while a total of 58 percent said that about congressional Democrats.