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Trump Tariffs

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    DockAdams -- Yes as you pointed out, the 128 products that China is slapping tariffs on starting today (Monday) include a 25 percent tariff on pork. That will have the effect of slowing exports to China. If the pork exporters (as well as the exporters of the other 127 products subjected to the new tariffs) cannot sell their products competitively in China at the higher prices, then they will have to find new markets or sell their increasing inventory in the USA at discounted prices.

    That will apply to the short term as the markets try to adjust to the upheaval. In the longer term if the American products cannot be sold competitively in the world market (or at home) jobs will be lost. The North Carolina pig farmers who voted for Trump will be looking for someone to blame. Democrats?

    Trump is a master at controlling the messaging...

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    Schmidt Wrote:

    DockAdams -- Yes as you pointed out, the 128 products that China is slapping tariffs on starting today (Monday) include a 25 percent tariff on pork. That will have the effect of slowing exports to China. If the pork exporters (as well as the exporters of the other 127 products subjected to the new tariffs) cannot sell their products competitively in China at the higher prices, then they will have to find new markets or sell their increasing inventory in the USA at discounted prices.

    That will apply to the short term as the markets try to adjust to the upheaval. In the longer term if the American products cannot be sold competitively in the world market (or at home) jobs will be lost. The North Carolina pig farmers who voted for Trump will be looking for someone to blame. Democrats?

    Trump is a master at controlling the messaging...

    Yes Schmidt; my guess is we will be hurt more than China; like one member said a lot of companies here are "owned" by China. So we will be bitten more than the other parties. Even the car industry, because Toyota's or BMW's are built here.

    There are not too many finished products the US exports; even Caterpillar is not a total US product. It is time Trump and his idiots like Ross go back to school.

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    Trump is a master at controlling the messaging...

    And that is crucial. Maybe in 5 or 10 years we can give a little thought towards changing this fact. Sarcasm of course. We (as a party) should hire 18 media experts and 20 others who can and will get us up to speed. Hire MZ ( and others who know the industries ) as a consultant to get us towards the present. YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and others (that I am not aware of) are very important to many under 50 years of age. Trump controls media and our party leaders are the proverbial "Deer in the headlights" guess what's attached to those headlights..... The truck intending to crush you. Thanks Mr. Perez for the nothing delivered yesterday and today. Tomorrow - Same thing ? Great !

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    Schmidt Wrote:

    DockAdams -- Yes as you pointed out, the 128 products that China is slapping tariffs on starting today (Monday) include a 25 percent tariff on pork. That will have the effect of slowing exports to China. If the pork exporters (as well as the exporters of the other 127 products subjected to the new tariffs) cannot sell their products competitively in China at the higher prices, then they will have to find new markets or sell their increasing inventory in the USA at discounted prices.

    That will apply to the short term as the markets try to adjust to the upheaval. In the longer term if the American products cannot be sold competitively in the world market (or at home) jobs will be lost. The North Carolina pig farmers who voted for Trump will be looking for someone to blame. Democrats?

    Trump is a master at controlling the messaging...

    Job losses at home, maybe. I was thinking that if producers like Smithfield have a glut of a commodity, the prices for those commodities will increase, and we the consumers will pay more. I had always thought a shortage of an item would make prices go up, but if you're a producer and your customer base is waning, then you increase prices to make up for revenue shortages.

    For sure, democrats might bear the brunt of trump's tariffs. Me thinks that Reagan might have started this trade mess?

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    Dockadams Wrote:

    The largest U.S. pork provider, Smithfield Ham, the 87-year-old Virginia-based meat giant, is owned by the Chinese.

    smithfieldfoods.com/our-brands

    Watch out for price increases at our grocery stores.

    I think that the tariffs apply to imports, not to goods produced in the US by Chinese owned companies. (Always happy to be proved wrong.)

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    Ray Pooch Wrote:
    Dockadams Wrote:

    The largest U.S. pork provider, Smithfield Ham, the 87-year-old Virginia-based meat giant, is owned by the Chinese.

    smithfieldfoods.com/our-brands

    Watch out for price increases at our grocery stores.

    I think that the tariffs apply to imports, not to goods produced in the US by Chinese owned companies. (Always happy to be proved wrong.)

    We're talking about both sides of the "tariffs"; the US did and the Chinese in return. It is an total stupidity of Trump and his cronies. I think the Chinese will hit us harder; even an Chevy is full of Chinese made parts, let alone your coffee maker or shoes and Trumps ties.
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    He (Trump) is actually hurting the very people who sent him to the white house, farmers and producers of pork and nuts are very nervous about that will happen next. There's news articles all over the web about the ramifications of his tariffs, I'm post a link to a website I'm not familiar with at all, I do not know if this website is right or left leaning.

    herald-review.com/business/agriculture/...

    "DECATUR — Central Illinois farmers and pork producers may be hurt by China's decision Monday to hike import duties on $3 billion worth of U.S products in response to U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum, state agriculture leaders say."

    This is a NPR (trusted middle of road website) npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/04/02/598...

    "wine, dried fruit, and nuts are now subject to a 15 percent duty.

    The announcement comes in response to the tariffs President Trump recently imposed on steel and aluminum. Trade officials from each country are negotiating, and it's not yet clear how long the duties will be in effect, or what the lasting impact will be for American producers and growers."

    Basically what Trump has done is set off a trade war, among other things and crises he has created.

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    Dockadams Wrote:

    He (Trump) is actually hurting the very people who sent him to the white house, farmers and producers of pork and nuts are very nervous about that will happen next. There's news articles all over the web about the ramifications of his tariffs, I'm post a link to a website I'm not familiar with at all, I do not know if this website is right or left leaning.

    herald-review.com/business/agriculture/...

    "DECATUR — Central Illinois farmers and pork producers may be hurt by China's decision Monday to hike import duties on $3 billion worth of U.S products in response to U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum, state agriculture leaders say."

    This is a NPR (trusted middle of road website) npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/04/02/598...

    "wine, dried fruit, and nuts are now subject to a 15 percent duty.

    The announcement comes in response to the tariffs President Trump recently imposed on steel and aluminum. Trade officials from each country are negotiating, and it's not yet clear how long the duties will be in effect, or what the lasting impact will be for American producers and growers."

    Basically what Trump has done is set off a trade war, among other things and crises he has created.

    The total stupidity of this Ross guy is unbelievable; he keeps hammering as Trump does that the "trade deficit" harms us. I guess he's forgetting that China is 10 times larger and has a much higher working population. Also the "attitude and "work mentality" is better in China. They produce therefore more "stuff" than over here; therefore we export less than they do. You can't change that, if their products are wanted here and not made here. The steel industry here will not expand, because these plants are way behind in producing quality high strengths steel or variations thereof. I remember that for the F16 huge aluminum blocks were imported to be machined into fuselage frames which were not produced in the US.

    Thus there will always be trade deficits with China. The only remedy is that we export more; which will not be the case since our products are too expensive to produce compared to some other countries as well China. A big point people forget here is that "education" plays a big role in how effective the workforce is.

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    There's no reason that we can't be at trade equilibrium with larger nations. We simply have to sell as much to them as we buy from them. Whether that is desirable in specific cases is a different question, but it's certainly possible.

    The fact that some other country is larger makes no difference. It just means that they produce more overall, and hence sell more overall, to all countries, and consume more overall, and hence import more overall, from all countries. It doesn't mean that they export more to all countries than they import, let alone that they export more to us in particular than they import.

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    Ray Pooch Wrote: There's no reason that we can't be at trade equilibrium with larger nations. We simply have to sell as much to them as we buy from them. Whether that is desirable in specific cases is a different question, but it's certainly possible.

    There's plenty of reasons the US isn't at a trade equilibrium with larger nations.

    Globalization, artificial intelligence, and our inability to invest in education happen to be a few.

    Ray Pooch Wrote: The fact that some other country is larger makes no difference. It just means that they produce more overall, and hence sell more overall, to all countries, and consume more overall, and hence import more overall, from all countries. It doesn't mean that they export more to all countries than they import, let alone that they export more to us in particular than they import.

    Now that's some verbal jujitsu.

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    jaredsxtn Wrote:
    Ray Pooch Wrote: There's no reason that we can't be at trade equilibrium with larger nations. We simply have to sell as much to them as we buy from them. Whether that is desirable in specific cases is a different question, but it's certainly possible.

    There's plenty of reasons the US isn't at a trade equilibrium with larger nations.

    Globalization, artificial intelligence, and our inability to invest in education happen to be a few.

    Are you disagreeing with something I said? I can't tell.

    Ray Pooch Wrote: The fact that some other country is larger makes no difference. It just means that they produce more overall, and hence sell more overall, to all countries, and consume more overall, and hence import more overall, from all countries. It doesn't mean that they export more to all countries than they import, let alone that they export more to us in particular than they import.

    Now that's some verbal jujitsu.

    Is that a good thing, or is there something here that you wish to disagree with?

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    Oh, what a lively discussion!
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    jaredsxtn Wrote:
    Ray Pooch Wrote: There's no reason that we can't be at trade equilibrium with larger nations. We simply have to sell as much to them as we buy from them. Whether that is desirable in specific cases is a different question, but it's certainly possible.

    There's plenty of reasons the US isn't at a trade equilibrium with larger nations.

    Globalization, artificial intelligence, and our inability to invest in education happen to be a few.

    Ray Pooch Wrote: The fact that some other country is larger makes no difference. It just means that they produce more overall, and hence sell more overall, to all countries, and consume more overall, and hence import more overall, from all countries. It doesn't mean that they export more to all countries than they import, let alone that they export more to us in particular than they import.

    Now that's some verbal jujitsu.

    Right on Jared. We're seeing teachers who are fed up with republican policies of cutting school funding demonstrating almost every day now. In my state it was Walker slashing union teacher funding and passing laws hurting union workers, now it's coming back to bite republicans in their asses, yesterday, Walker told a crowd of supporters and took to twitter that he was worried about a blue wave.

    "Governor Scott Walker and the Republican Party of Wisconsin are not taking the loss lightly, but instead taking it as a wake up call. Walker took to Twitter saying "results show we are at risk of a #bluewave...the far left is driven by anger and hatred and we must counter it."

    Chair of the Democratic Party of Wisconsin says the Governor is worried this blue wave trend is building.

    “Governor Walker is running scared and he sees that his agenda is not resonating with the people and those people are beginning to make different choices," said Martha Laning, Chair of DPW."

    http://www.wkow.com/story/37882815/2018/04/Wednesday/democrats-say-gov-walker-is-running-scared-of-the-blue-wave

    While I went off topic here a bit, what is news is that Iowa & Illinois farmers are concerned about the tariffs, in an interview with a farmer aired this morning on national news, he claimed he voted for trump but now does not support trumps policies. I guess they're learning their lessons the hard way.

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    Dockadams Wrote:
    jaredsxtn Wrote:
    Ray Pooch Wrote: There's no reason that we can't be at trade equilibrium with larger nations. We simply have to sell as much to them as we buy from them. Whether that is desirable in specific cases is a different question, but it's certainly possible.

    There's plenty of reasons the US isn't at a trade equilibrium with larger nations.

    Globalization, artificial intelligence, and our inability to invest in education happen to be a few.

    Ray Pooch Wrote: The fact that some other country is larger makes no difference. It just means that they produce more overall, and hence sell more overall, to all countries, and consume more overall, and hence import more overall, from all countries. It doesn't mean that they export more to all countries than they import, let alone that they export more to us in particular than they import.

    Now that's some verbal jujitsu.

    Right on Jared. We're seeing teachers who are fed up with republican policies of cutting school funding demonstrating almost every day now. In my state it was Walker slashing union teacher funding and passing laws hurting union workers, now it's coming back to bite republicans in their asses, yesterday, Walker told a crowd of supporters and took to twitter that he was worried about a blue wave.

    "Governor Scott Walker and the Republican Party of Wisconsin are not taking the loss lightly, but instead taking it as a wake up call. Walker took to Twitter saying "results show we are at risk of a #bluewave...the far left is driven by anger and hatred and we must counter it."

    Chair of the Democratic Party of Wisconsin says the Governor is worried this blue wave trend is building.

    “Governor Walker is running scared and he sees that his agenda is not resonating with the people and those people are beginning to make different choices," said Martha Laning, Chair of DPW."

    wkow.com/story/37882815/2018/04/Wednesd...

    While I went off topic here a bit, what is news is that Iowa & Illinois farmers are concerned about the tariffs, in an interview with a farmer aired this morning on national news, he claimed he voted for trump but now does not support trumps policies. I guess they're learning their lessons the hard way.

    Dock, you see it right; for sure as Jared said: It is the lack of education here; especially in the mid, north, south section of this country. Also most "tech" companies are located in either "west" or "east" part of the country; the "rust" belt is well known in the center of the country like Detroit and Pittsburg. China does not have that problem, at least they spent money on education, technology and decent healthcare, instead of spending it all on the military and wars and lawyers. Also they elect "leaders" who know how the world works; not the imbecile we got here on this "island".
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    Dutch Wrote: China does not have that problem, at least they spent money on education, technology and decent healthcare, instead of spending it all on the military and wars and lawyers. Also they elect "leaders" who know how the world works; not the imbecile we got here on this "island".

    I still prefer the American system of "electing" leaders. The occasional Trump is a small price to pay.