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Trump tax increases

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  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Dallas, TX
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    In the last few days, I’ve heard talk that the Trump administration wants gas tax hikes, online sales taxes, and import tax hikes.

    These are all regressive taxes and it’s our constituency that’s going to pay.

    Democrats need to throw a Tea Party and campaign against these proposed tax hikes.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    I'm okay with gasoline tax increases that specifically pay for the upkeep of roads and bridges. People like me that travel a lot should pay the biggest share of that particular part of the maintenance of infrastructure. Ditto on fees on toll roads and bridges as long as the money is spent on the roads and bridges.

    I agree with you on the online sales tax and import tax hikes.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    I'm okay with gasoline tax increases that specifically pay for the upkeep of roads and bridges. People like me that travel a lot should pay the biggest share of that particular part of the maintenance of infrastructure. Ditto on fees on toll roads and bridges as long as the money is spent on the roads and bridges.

    I agree with you on the online sales tax and import tax hikes.

    Poor people traditionally have gas guzzlers and will be paying a significantly higher percentage. Not fair.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    I'm okay with gasoline tax increases that specifically pay for the upkeep of roads and bridges. People like me that travel a lot should pay the biggest share of that particular part of the maintenance of infrastructure. Ditto on fees on toll roads and bridges as long as the money is spent on the roads and bridges.

    I agree with you on the online sales tax and import tax hikes.

    You must be kidding! Guess what, Trump wants that money for his "wall" or his wasteful trips and luxury. Lovely, tax "cuts" for the rich and then screw the normal living worker.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Chet Ruminski Wrote:
    Poor people traditionally have gas guzzlers and will be paying a significantly higher percentage. Not fair.

    Mexico has a zero gasoline tax and a whole hell of a lot of poor people despite also being an oil exporter. Venezuela has a 12 cents per gallon full gas price (government owns all stations) and has a whole hell of a lot of poor people -- and Venezuela has some of the largest oil reserves in the world. Likewise, Nigeria has a 38 cent per gallon full price and also has lots and lots of poor people despite also being a world oil exporter with massive oil reserves.

    Norway, on the other hand, has a gasoline tax of $3.67 per gallon (full price $6.27 per gallon). They also are a huge oil exporting country, but the difference is that they have very few poor people. Norway has invested in public transport (as well as social programs) which are the great equalizer. High gasoline taxes incentivize public transport.

    When I lived in London for nine years, I never owned a car. It wasn't economical. We took public transport everywhere, and we had two children. When we traveled all over Europe we took the trains, buses and only occasionally a rental car.

    The point I am making is that European countries use high gasoline tax to help subsidize cheap public transport, which helps the poor. A regional public transport system is, of course, more difficult in the USA because we have so many small rural communities that are increasingly feeling more and more isolated. Many of those communities have already died except for a few die hard locals who refuse to move.

    In the long term, our country would do better to increase gasoline taxes for highway infrastructure. It helps everyone who travels, including those who travel by bus. Even higher gasoline taxes could help subsidize public transport...which helps the poor.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Dallas, TX
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    Schmidt Wrote:
    Chet Ruminski Wrote:
    Poor people traditionally have gas guzzlers and will be paying a significantly higher percentage. Not fair.

    Mexico has a zero gasoline tax and a whole hell of a lot of poor people despite also being an oil exporter. Venezuela has a 12 cents per gallon full gas price (government owns all stations) and has a whole hell of a lot of poor people -- and Venezuela has some of the largest oil reserves in the world. Likewise, Nigeria has a 38 cent per gallon full price and also has lots and lots of poor people despite also being a world oil exporter with massive oil reserves.

    Norway, on the other hand, has a gasoline tax of $3.67 per gallon (full price $6.27 per gallon). They also are a huge oil exporting country, but the difference is that they have very few poor people. Norway has invested in public transport (as we as social programs) which are the great equalizer. High gasoline taxes incentivize public transport.

    When I lived in London for nine years, I never owned a car. It wasn't economical. We took public transport everywhere, and we had two children. When we traveled all over Europe we took the trains, buses and only occasionally a rental car.

    The point I am making is that European countries use high gasoline tax to help subsidize cheap public transport, which helps the poor. A regional public transport system is, of course, more difficult in the USA because we have so many small rural communities that are increasingly feeling more and more isolated. Many of those communities have already died except for a few die hard locals who refuse to move.

    In the long term, our country would do better to increase gasoline taxes for highway infrastructure. It helps everyone who travels, including those who travel by bus. Even higher gasoline taxes could help subsidize public transport...which helps the poor.

    so assessing taxes or user fees on those utilizing public services or infrastructure is a legitimate form of taxation, but the question is does the tax serve public purpose? All taxes are about reducing the activity taxed. That’s how the aggregate demand management works, which is not to raise revenue for government to spend. So if we want to raise the gasoline tax, we are saying that we want people to use less gasoline.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    "All taxes are about reducing the activity taxed. "

    Exactly and that puts the brunt of every consumer tax on the backs of poor people. That is exactly why I lost respect for Obama because he did not want to alleviate the gasoline tax in 2008 when gasoline was $5 a gallon. Taxes on consumption hurt poor people and don't reduce consumption on upper incomes at all. During that period off shore recreational fishing boats spent between $1500 to $5000 a week for gasoline. Just another reason Trump is president.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Dallas, TX
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    Now Wilbur Ross and the Commerce Dept want tariffs on steel, etc.

    cnbc.com/2018/02/16/commerce-department...

    If we want to help our businesses compete with foreigners, we should subsidize them, instead of taxing consumers.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:
    Chet Ruminski Wrote:
    Poor people traditionally have gas guzzlers and will be paying a significantly higher percentage. Not fair.

    Mexico has a zero gasoline tax and a whole hell of a lot of poor people despite also being an oil exporter. Venezuela has a 12 cents per gallon full gas price (government owns all stations) and has a whole hell of a lot of poor people -- and Venezuela has some of the largest oil reserves in the world. Likewise, Nigeria has a 38 cent per gallon full price and also has lots and lots of poor people despite also being a world oil exporter with massive oil reserves.

    Norway, on the other hand, has a gasoline tax of $3.67 per gallon (full price $6.27 per gallon). They also are a huge oil exporting country, but the difference is that they have very few poor people. Norway has invested in public transport (as well as social programs) which are the great equalizer. High gasoline taxes incentivize public transport.

    When I lived in London for nine years, I never owned a car. It wasn't economical. We took public transport everywhere, and we had two children. When we traveled all over Europe we took the trains, buses and only occasionally a rental car.

    The point I am making is that European countries use high gasoline tax to help subsidize cheap public transport, which helps the poor. A regional public transport system is, of course, more difficult in the USA because we have so many small rural communities that are increasingly feeling more and more isolated. Many of those communities have already died except for a few die hard locals who refuse to move.

    In the long term, our country would do better to increase gasoline taxes for highway infrastructure. It helps everyone who travels, including those who travel by bus. Even higher gasoline taxes could help subsidize public transport...which helps the poor.

    Schmidt, are you that "naive"? Sure this works in Europe, there you get something for your "tax money" ; not here it disappears either in "pockets" or the "army" or a "wall" or Trump's "trips". Wake up please!! This country is corrupt and stays corrupt; "budgets" means nothing here. They shovel it around as much as possible to get the most "bang" for their own pockets.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Carlitos Wrote:

    Now Wilbur Ross and the Commerce Dept want tariffs on steel, etc.

    cnbc.com/2018/02/16/commerce-department...

    If we want to help our businesses compete with foreigners, we should subsidize them, instead of taxing consumers.

    Subsidizing USA is in essence what I have been saying. Penalize non productive investing like derivatives and expanded definition of futures since 2001, high speed micro second trading etc. Put USA back in the business of making sought after goods. Reward goods and services investing .
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Getting jobs back is an excuse for not creating new jobs. Why cause more world strife when just the opposite is possible for making money work.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Chet, just think about on how our tax money is spent. Most of it goes to things which does not benefit the tax payer. For instance the trillions spent on our "meddling" in the world, having the military and drones etc. all over the place does not benefit anyone here. The 4 trillion "debt" added to the present "debt" (of which the most of it ends up at the "rich" or stupid "wall's") has to be paid back with interest to whoever loaned us such money. Printing more money devaluates the dollar; so that is also no solution. I bet the "proposed added "gas tax" money never will end up in "infrastructure", but be used what ever "congress" likes to do with it. Don't forget if the government gets involved in infrastructure, then you get the same situation as in Puerto Rico that you as "taxpayer" are being ripped off because of the "kickbacks" etc. Like the "power" fix contract there.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:
    Chet Ruminski Wrote:
    Poor people traditionally have gas guzzlers and will be paying a significantly higher percentage. Not fair.

    Mexico has a zero gasoline tax and a whole hell of a lot of poor people despite also being an oil exporter. Venezuela has a 12 cents per gallon full gas price (government owns all stations) and has a whole hell of a lot of poor people -- and Venezuela has some of the largest oil reserves in the world. Likewise, Nigeria has a 38 cent per gallon full price and also has lots and lots of poor people despite also being a world oil exporter with massive oil reserves.

    Norway, on the other hand, has a gasoline tax of $3.67 per gallon (full price $6.27 per gallon). They also are a huge oil exporting country, but the difference is that they have very few poor people. Norway has invested in public transport (as well as social programs) which are the great equalizer. High gasoline taxes incentivize public transport.

    When I lived in London for nine years, I never owned a car. It wasn't economical. We took public transport everywhere, and we had two children. When we traveled all over Europe we took the trains, buses and only occasionally a rental car.

    The point I am making is that European countries use high gasoline tax to help subsidize cheap public transport, which helps the poor. A regional public transport system is, of course, more difficult in the USA because we have so many small rural communities that are increasingly feeling more and more isolated. Many of those communities have already died except for a few die hard locals who refuse to move.

    In the long term, our country would do better to increase gasoline taxes for highway infrastructure. It helps everyone who travels, including those who travel by bus. Even higher gasoline taxes could help subsidize public transport...which helps the poor.

    "When we traveled all over Europe we took the trains, buses and only occasionally a rental car.

    The point I am making is that European countries use high gasoline tax to help subsidize cheap public transport, which helps the poor."

    Mass transportation is not an option here. A high gasoline tax is a regressive penalty to poor people in the USA. I have no problem with taxes. I do have a problem with taxing people when they are denied the opportunity to earn a living wage.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Chet -- If you are against all regressive taxes, then can I assume you are against all state and local sales taxes, toll road fees, toll bridge fees, excise taxes on beer, wine, cigarettes and guns, as well as payroll taxes to fund Social Security and Medicare? They are all regressive taxes/fees that disproportionately hurt the poor by taking a larger percentage of their disposable income for spending.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    Chet -- If you are against all regressive taxes, then can I assume you are against all state and local sales taxes, toll road fees, toll bridge fees, excise taxes on beer, wine, cigarettes and guns, as well as payroll taxes to fund Social Security and Medicare? They are all regressive taxes/fees that disproportionately hurt the poor by taking a larger percentage of their disposable income for spending.

    Of course I am against taxing disproportionately. Low income people should have cards that lets them buy tax free.