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Did Hillary Clinton blow the 2016 election by snubbing Black voters?

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    Last night I was at a Black History Month event in Alabama which focused on Black suffrage and the power of the Black voting bloc. When the issue of Hillary Clinton's 2016 election loss was brought up, I spoke my piece that she'd won the popular vote but was defeated by the Electoral College decision. The Electoral College is the law of the land Black historian Ed Vaughn reminded me, and Republicans took special care to win critical Electoral College numbers in swing states like Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Florida, etc., while Clinton alienated critical Black voting blocs in states like Michigan by snubbing Detroit in favor of trying to win votes in white Betsy DeVos land like Grand Rapids, and by snubbing Black voters in Black suburbs around Cleveland, Ohio, while Republicans were doing their very best to make it difficult for Black voters to register to vote as well as suppressing Black votes in all of those states.

    As we can see from the dramatic win by Doug Jones in Alabama in 2017, the Black voter dynamic can no longer be ignored by the Democratic party. White women voters cannot be wooed into voting Democratic even if it means electing an alleged child molester like Roy Moore or a sexist swine like Donald Trump.

    The Democratic Party must be active in enabling Black suffrage by making it easier to register to vote, by making it easier to vote for working voters who often cannot afford to lose a working day's income in order to vote.

    Doug Jones' win in Alabama is a lesson for Democrats. Had it not been for dynamic role of Black women voters in Alabama who refused to vote against their own interests by voting for an alleged child molester, Jones might not have won.

    And, as a white woman, I often find that my own interests are more often aligned with those of the Black Caucus in Congress than they are with the interests of the DNC.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Karen Hedwig Backm Wrote:

    Last night I was at a Black History Month event in Alabama which focused on Black suffrage and the power of the Black voting bloc. When the issue of Hillary Clinton's 2016 election loss was brought up, I spoke my piece that she'd won the popular vote but was defeated by the Electoral College decision. The Electoral College is the law of the land Black historian Ed Vaughn reminded me, and Republicans took special care to win critical Electoral College numbers in swing states like Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Florida, etc., while Clinton alienated critical Black voting blocs in states like Michigan by snubbing Detroit in favor of trying to win votes in white Betsy DeVos land like Grand Rapids, and by snubbing Black voters in Black suburbs around Cleveland, Ohio, while Republicans were doing their very best to make it difficult for Black voters to register to vote as well as suppressing Black votes in all of those states.

    As we can see from the dramatic win by Doug Jones in Alabama in 2017, the Black voter dynamic can no longer be ignored by the Democratic party. White women voters cannot be wooed into voting Democratic even if it means electing an alleged child molester like Roy Moore or a sexist swine like Donald Trump.

    The Democratic Party must be active in enabling Black suffrage by making it easier to register to vote, by making it easier to vote for working voters who often cannot afford to lose a working day's income in order to vote.

    Doug Jones' win in Alabama is a lesson for Democrats. Had it not been for dynamic role of Black women voters in Alabama who refused to vote against their own interests by voting for an alleged child molester, Jones might not have won.

    And, as a white woman, I often find that my own interests are more often aligned with those of the Black Caucus in Congress than they are with the interests of the DNC.

    The only thing I hope is that the Dem's learned their lesson in 2016; but I doubt it; I've not seen anything yet which makes the "blacks" nor the "latino's" enthousiastic about the DNC program, which is not much advertised nor promoted in the States which have the most of these minorities. The voting which took place in Georgia in 2017 shows that the message did not come across nor that enough money was injected to run an strong campaign.
  • Independent
    Washington
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    To snub someone is to infer they are not worthy of interest and\or have little value as a person; in this case, a black voter. For minorities, they are going to perceive being snubbed as being racially motivated, which is likely to be the case. I don't perceive Hillary Clinton snubbed black voters. Given trump is a person who had said many racist things and support others who are clearly racists, HC may have assumed she did not need to spend as much effort trying to win the the black vote away from trump. Possibly black voters just stayed home rather than voting.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Exactly. She assumed she had their votes. One of many poor choices made.
  • Independent
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    Snubbed black voters? No, I don't think so. She snubbed Michigan and Wisconsin via poor campaigning. Yes, racism played a role in electing the asshat-in-chief but that was not really the single deciding factor. Most of the racists would have voted for Trump anyway. It may be true that more racists voted in the election but we can't really determine that. Imo, it was a combination of several things including poor campaigning, racism, hatred of Hillary, changing economy and lose of privilege translated as changing demographics. Changing demographics is NOT the same as racism. It is more that the world won't be as it was which is unacceptable to many people.
  • Strongly Liberal
    Independent
    Ohio
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    Hillary was a horrible candidate. She lost in 08 ,usually when a politician loses they go away. She did not run in 12 because she had zero chance. If a politician is serious they run even if they have no chance because they are trying to accomplish something . Hillary's history is fraught with black marks. She called black teenage offenders " super predators, at one time. She bungled every single opportunity she was given by her husband hen he was president . She bungled being sec of state. The whole we came we saw he died bullshit was very poor judgement. Death is never a joke. Hillary would have been a bad choice and in the long run , once we have lived through our current nightmare maybe people will decide to vote.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    As I said way in the past; there should be a "connection" with the candidate and the public. Hillary always acted as an "superior' tea lady with her "pinky" up in the air. A bit arrogant. I guess "colored" people see this as the woman of a slave driver. Thus that does not work. They would like a person who mingles with them and understands their "class" and culture.

    As an example Trump lowers himself to the "mob" class and of course that puts him on the same level and shows it did work; they elected him. So it will be extremely hard to get a woman of "class" win an election in this country. Of course that is possible only in certain States which have a different "class" and attitude, like happened last year in VA. In the majority of "evangelical" States impossible, unless it is "mother Teresa"