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Prosperity would solve most problems.

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  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    It seems glaringly simple to me that improving the income of the general population would solve almost all problems. It seems glaringly simple that it would would be very easy to bring prosperity to the general public without giving them anything and without taking anything away from anybody except making people work a little harder for the money that they claim they work so hard for. All that would have to happen would be to reward jobs producing investments and penalize non productive investments. All the money people would still own all the money, all the property people would still own all the property, all the rich people would still be all the same rich people. All the right wing people could not be happier because almost everybody would be working and earning for what they have. The only difference is that the stock market and trading market would be making profit on earnings instead of tradings. And that is what most people think the stock market is anyways. Invest money in companies and get paid from the earnings. I guarantee that 90% of the people have no idea that earned money is virtually insignificant in the stock market. Why not put money to work and let the country prosper through hard work, the whole country?
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    No Chet, "money" does not always make people happy; how about health, education, a clean environment, clean oceans without plastic, clean air to breathe, great advanced infrastructure, clean beautiful natural parks, clean energy, no homeless people, proper laws; also applicable to our leaders; proper vetting for Presidents and higher people in the government; proper voting laws without "money" or lobbyists; let only "votes" count. etc etc etc. In general "happiness" should count; in little towns in Europe they smile and are happy with their life. Not here!
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    I agree with Dutch. A poorly educated 45 year old high school dropout who is now competing with technology isn't going to magically find themselves prosperous if the government changes how the stock market functions.

    Education, education, education. That's what our government needs to be heavily investing in. Why do you think we have to import (for lack of a better term) hundreds of thousands of workers here to America? Because our education system sucks. Or I should say it sucks for non-rich people. Changing how the stock market functions isn't going to magically fix that.

    That's why I think it's time to start having a serious discussion about a universal basic income. Technology isn't going to go backwards. More and more people are going to find themselves on the unemployment line not because José took their job, but because Watson did.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    "Education, education, education."

    Doesn't mean a thing if there is no money to be spent. First money has to be put back into the economy to start the system working. Remember the story Schmidt told about the inn keeper starting prosperity in his town by spending the guests money. That is the key to an economy. Spend money. One dollar can put many people to work or one dollar can sit in a futures fund and put nobody to work.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    jaredsxtn Wrote:

    I agree with Dutch. A poorly educated 45 year old high school dropout who is now competing with technology isn't going to magically find themselves prosperous if the government changes how the stock market functions.

    Education, education, education. That's what our government needs to be heavily investing in. Why do you think we have to import (for lack of a better term) hundreds of thousands of workers here to America? Because our education system sucks. Or I should say it sucks for non-rich people. Changing how the stock market functions isn't going to magically fix that.

    That's why I think it's time to start having a serious discussion about a universal basic income. Technology isn't going to go backwards. More and more people are going to find themselves on the unemployment line not because José took their job, but because Watson did.

    Yes Jared I agree with you as well. Yes "proper" education is the clue, especially because "robots" work cheaper and more efficient. The problem here is they refuse to look at the future in the job market. Here there is way to much money spent on "sidelines" like an huge millions of dollars football stadium at a school, instead of teaching/preparing them for what future jobs demand from them. Even lots of industries here stood still in time, especially in logistics. As an example: I had an internet "out" for 4 days. I called their repair dept. daily. Their only answer was "we are working on it". I kept asking "what are they working on"; they did not know. So I told them how it should be done. When I started in the aviation industry, my first job was to run the AOG ( Aircraft On Ground) department. Aircraft can't be delayed or it cost money. So to repair a plane it has to be done such way that everyone is aware of the problem and reports every 10 minutes what is the status or what is needed to fix the problem. These reports are then also used to analyse the problem and improve turnaround times in case it happens again. However Century Link never heard of such working method. Efficiency in this country is a dirty word; schools therefore should learn people to think that way. etc. etc.

    Trump is an living example of an uneducated person.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    It's the Dunning–Kruger effect.

  • Independent
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    It's the Dunning–Kruger effect.

    Basically devolves down to two things:

    1) We got the government we deserve.

    2) This whole "anyone can grow up to be president" should be discarded.

  • Independent
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    A couple of things.

    Many issues can be resolved by people having decent wage jobs. Ever see a happy man that needed to conquer the world? Unfortunately creative destruction has proceeded as it does with the end result that the jobs being created will not create the mass employment that was created during the period of the 19th century into the mid-20th century. One of the crucial developments was increased efficiency of automation. Why can we crank out millions of cars and appliances with fewer people? The stock market certainly needs to be regulated but that in the end means nothing. If there was massive investment into infrastructure from water systems, wastewater systems, highways and bridges to solar farms, wind farms, buried utilities, high speed internet and so on many people could be employed at least temporarily. That investment will not come from billionaires, it will come from taxes. We must also look at geriatric healthcare as an investment area. The time has come to stop simply warehousing the elderly. Wages must be increased for these workers, more nurses/doctors available and so on.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    It's the Dunning–Kruger effect.

    Thanks Schmidt; good piece; it is time that the vetting of our "leaders" includes "analytic" qualities. But yeah, why "vet" an President who is "superior" and as he said: "I know more of healthcare and taxes than anyone in this country"; I guess then we belong to the stupid types according to him. He must have been sent by "god" and had his education on Mars.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    lonely bird Wrote:
    Schmidt Wrote:

    It's the Dunning–Kruger effect.

    Basically devolves down to two things:

    1) We got the government we deserve.

    2) This whole "anyone can grow up to be president" should be discarded.

    "anyone can grow up to what they let you achieve". As long as there is a stranglehold on money there is not much hope for great aspirations. The problem is the people that can make a difference are terrified to say stop the stagnating gambling and force money into jobs producing investments. Wages will go up, spending will increase, congress will spend the increased revenue and prosperity will prevail. The only changes will be shifting money from the huge futures/derivatives market into the products and services for sale market. The fantasy of the modern entrepreneur is no longer an invention but IPO. THE e only has to be directed back to institutions instead of e ents. Make something to sell.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Dutch Wrote: No Chet, "money" does not always make people happy; how about health, education, a clean environment, clean oceans without plastic, clean air to breathe, great advanced infrastructure, clean beautiful natural parks, clean energy, no homeless people, proper laws; also applicable to our leaders; proper vetting for Presidents and higher people in the government; proper voting laws without "money" or lobbyists; let only "votes" count. etc etc etc. In general "happiness" should count; in little towns in Europe they smile and are happy with their life. Not here!

    Dutch, The fastest and easiest way to "health, education,and a clean environment," is through an electorate appreciative of what they have. Give the middle class good wages and they will spend it. They are the most generous people and will support any humanitarian cause. Let people earn good wages and you won't see government getting away with taking healthcare away from children.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Wages are competitive in the global market place. Workers compete with other workers in the USA who will work for a lower wage. Hence many auto manufacturing jobs left Detroit for the southern states. And for companies competing in the overseas markets, wages are a big factor to remain competitive. Too high of wages and they cannot sell their products abroad.

    And don't forget that many jobs were lost due to automation...a machine that can do the task cheaper. The higher the wage, the greater the chance that a machine will be able to do the job faster and cheaper...and the costs includes such things as "vacations" and health care. Machines don't join unions and don't complain.

    Those at lower risk of losing jobs are at the high end of skills, those requiring a higher education. The people that build and run those machines are highly skilled.

    So yes, education is a big driver of prosperity.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    Wages are competitive in the global market place. Workers compete with other workers in the USA who will work for a lower wage. Hence many auto manufacturing jobs left Detroit for the southern states. And for companies competing in the overseas markets, wages are a big factor to remain competitive. Too high of wages and they cannot sell their products abroad.

    And don't forget that many jobs were lost due to automation...a machine that can do the task cheaper. The higher the wage, the greater the chance that a machine will be able to do the job faster and cheaper...and the costs includes such things as "vacations" and health care. Machines don't join unions and don't complain.

    Those at lower risk of losing jobs are at the high end of skills, those requiring a higher education. The people that build and run those machines are highly skilled.

    So yes, education is a big driver of prosperity.

    You are ignoring the trillions of dollars taken out out the products and service markets and put into the futures and insurance market. Education won't drive prosperity unless the money is in the market. Look at the student debt that remains unpaid because of low paying jobs available to college graduates. 1.2 Trillion dollars of debt. More money than the economies except the top ten countries. Our college graduates are too poor to pay their debt.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    Wages are competitive in the global market place. Workers compete with other workers in the USA who will work for a lower wage. Hence many auto manufacturing jobs left Detroit for the southern states. And for companies competing in the overseas markets, wages are a big factor to remain competitive. Too high of wages and they cannot sell their products abroad.

    And don't forget that many jobs were lost due to automation...a machine that can do the task cheaper. The higher the wage, the greater the chance that a machine will be able to do the job faster and cheaper...and the costs includes such things as "vacations" and health care. Machines don't join unions and don't complain.

    Those at lower risk of losing jobs are at the high end of skills, those requiring a higher education. The people that build and run those machines are highly skilled.

    So yes, education is a big driver of prosperity.

    Yes again you are correct. Furthermore as Chet incorrectly said; "happiness" is not always coupled to having a good paying job; there are so many other factors which make people happy or sad.
  • Independent
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    The concept is too simplistic.

    Profit declines so what choices does capital have? Eliminate competition via consolidation. Drive down wage bills by cutting staff, automation or cutting wages across the board including moving to low wage areas. What is ignored are options such as decoupling management from stock options as stock options creates an agency problem, cutting management salary or number of managers.

    Education while worthwhile is not the answer. What costs are involved in retraining a 40 year old worker? Who pays those costs? Retraining to do what job? We have heard of a so-called shortage of engineers. What fields? How many can be trained to become the engineers that we are short? What impact will AI have on engineering?

    As for the stock market the big institutional investors are not going to funnel assets into what appears to be high-risk investments in “new technology” only to discover that the new technology isn’t scalable. Yes, yes, they invested stupidly in derivatives. But why? Because the fraud committed told them they were triple A rated. And since humans, not markets, make decisions they simply made bad decisions. Yes, the F.I.R.E. sector needs to be reined in. If I had my way every CEO from the banks would be in jail. But that is another issue all together. The new technologies, advanced manufacturing so on and so on will not generate the number of jobs required to keep a level of consumption necessary to keep standards of living high.

    Lunch is intruding. Back later...