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Electric cars again.


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    Something is brewing with Tesla. Musk thinks he can go "private" (no longer on the stockmarket). However something "smells" An Saudia investor wants to invest over 12 billion; I wonder why. Don't forget Saudia is one of the largest oil exporter there is, so they may see Tesla as an threat to their business and may instead of boosting it may want to kill it. Also because of all the investments Tesla does at the moment lots of money is borrowed. By producing only about 100,000 cars you can't be very profitable; compare such to Fiat/Chrysler who produces millions of cars and their stock is only about $17 per share while Tesla's is about $380 a share. So something does not add up. Thus I guess Musk sees only the "dollar" signs but does not realize the motive of the Saudi's ; but yeah he will still profit, but the shareholders may be can bite the desert dust. If this materializes then Trump has lost again an American company.
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    Musk is knowledgeable about money. He made a private announcement about going private several hours before an official announcement and suspension of trading. There was about a 7% upspike in the price of the stock after the private announcement and the suspension of trading. I think that exposes Musk to some serious charges. If people took advantage of that 7% spike it is going to look bad for Musk. If Musk used that information then he could be exposed to some very serious charges. No matter the outcome it looks very bad for Musk.
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    It was an 11% spike before trading stopped.
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    Elon Musk, the eccentric young man shouldn't have done what he did, there's talk now that the SEC is showing interest in calling for an inquiry, going private, dumb guy, but eccentric. He'd better move to a country that doesn't have an extradition pact with the US government.
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    Dockadams Wrote: Elon Musk, the eccentric young man shouldn't have done what he did, there's talk now that the SEC is showing interest in calling for an inquiry, going private, dumb guy, but eccentric. He'd better move to a country that doesn't have an extradition pact with the US government.

    Maybe Musk is going to reverse engineer the profit system to value earnings instead of advertising and create good paying jobs. But if that would work on its own it would already be working. A lot of musk's billions come from knowing how to work the system and I think he is facing coming up short on his Ponzied grants. He is one of those people that gets truckloads of money dumped on him.

    Elon Musk's companies have always depended on government money ...

    Business Insider


    where did the money come from for Musk's space program from amp.businessinsider.com

    Jun 8, 2015 · "Elon Musk is addicted to government money!" ... The space agency is by far the growing

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    The upcoming Biden Administration elicits unequal parts worry and excitement when it comes to electric vehicles and the future of the automobile industry. The excitement is there, in spades and with good reason, but there are worries from many corners as well.

    Excitement over electric vehicles flows from the president-elect himself, who promoted two distinct EV policies in his campaign climate plan. First, his Day One "unprecedented executive actions" include moving the federal government procurement system toward 100 percent "clean energy and zero-emissions vehicles" as well as making sure U.S. fuel-economy standards are set so they get "100 percent of new sales for light- and medium-duty vehicles [to] be electrified" alongside annual improvements for heavy-duty vehicles.

    Second, Biden's "Year One Legislative Agenda" is to include accelerating the deployment of electric vehicles by working with governors and mayors to deploy over 500,000 new public charging outlets by the end of 2030. The plan also calls for restoring the federal government's electric-vehicle tax credit and targeting it toward middle-class consumers while prioritizing electric vehicles made in America when possible.

    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a34671545/biden-presidency-electric-vehicles/

    Be careful what you wish for.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-apps/imrs.php?src=https://arc-anglerfish-washpost-prod-washpost.s3.amazonaws.com/public/DMY2YD7SGJAOJGLLAYLREYAN4E.jpg&w=916

    Usmaan Ahmad said he wants Tesla to investigate the fire that destroyed his Model S, but the company has not proved eager to do so. (Usmaan Ahmad)

    Seconds after Usmaan Ahmad heard metallic bangs in his Tesla Model S last month and pulled off a suburban Dallas thoroughfare, flames started shooting out of his five-year-old car.

    The sound was like “if you were to drop an axle of a normal car” on the ground, Ahmad, 41, said. Only the car was intact, he recalled. Suddenly, as he stood on the side of the road, the car ignited in flames, concentrated around the front passenger-side wheel. “This was shooting out like a flamethrower,” recalled Ahmad, who works in strategy and business development for a health-care system.

    The combustion of Ahmad’s car is one of a growing number of fire incidents involving older Tesla Model S and X vehicles that experts say are related to the battery, raising questions about the safety and durability of electric vehicles as they age. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is evaluating the fire of Ahmad’s vehicle in Frisco, Tex., and has contacted Tesla over the matter, NHTSA spokesman Sean Rushton said this month. The agency opened an investigation last year into alleged battery defects that could cause fires in older Tesla sedans and SUVs.

    Other electric vehicle models have faced federal scrutiny and voluntary recalls over fire risks. Last month, NHTSA announced General Motors was recalling more than 50,000 Chevrolet Bolt electric cars in the United States over the potential for fire in its high-voltage battery pack, after the agency confirmed there were five known fires involving the vehicle, resulting in two injuries. NHTSA advised owners to park their cars outside until the problem is repaired.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/12/28/tesla-battery-fire/

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    If you look at the Copart site then you will find hundreds of Tesla's involved in crashes etc. The biggest problem if they are re-cyclebar because of the batteries. These batteries are an environmental hazard; so again as with any advancement, it has its negative issues as well. Since the Tesla's mingle in the older traffic they have become dangerous, because of the partly "self-driving" features. Certain traffic situations can't be "programmed" so that causes all the accidents. Also the big touch screens in the car to the right side of the driver works kind of dangerous because it takes the attention on the road away of the driver. Especially older people will have difficulty to understand the logic of the screen and make mistakes.

    I've driven one and hate such cars and don't like the interface with the driver at all.