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The bleak future for gas stations

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  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    MSN:CNBC: Op-Ed: Gas stations are going away sooner than you think

    Traditional city gas stations will disappear from the urban environment as all electric vehicles become commonplace in the city.

    "To really jump start electric vehicle use, we need to stop focusing on wired super charging at gas stations and focus more on wireless charging everywhere else. Because people aren't going to go a place to charge. They're going to charge at the places they go."

    That's right...where people shop (e.g. supermarkets) to where they park their cars (commuter train stations) people will be able to charge their cars wirelessly. The typical commuter has a round trip of much less than 200 miles, the average range of EVs as they are called.

    I read a report that you cannot find a gas station in the downtown area of Boston, for example, because the land has more potential for other commercial ventures. It will further accelerate the EV market for commuters.

    Wireless charging is something that might have defied the imagination a few years ago but it is here now and the technology is getting better every day.

    More jobs gone by the wayside...especially in Oregon and New Jersey where you are not allowed to pump your own gas.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    No, not in FL they are building in our town at least 10 new huge gas stations. Furthermore the number of electric cars built by others than Tesla has dropped considerably. As long as there are cheaper "gas" cars around (which cars last at least 10 years) the electric one's will not make much of an dent. Just look an Toyota car lot; cars for around $10 K versus Tesla $60K; I can buy at least 6 used Toyota's for that. As long as gas can be supplied for around $ 2.50 no problem. Don't forget either that Trump approved the "pipelines" so oil will keep flowing. Also don't forget motorcycles, trucks etc. which certainly are not becoming electric overnight. It has neither been proven yet what the "real life" of an Tesla car is compared to an "gas" car. Since I'm looking often on sites for "crashed" repairable cars; I've got the impression that most Tesla's are not repairable after an crash, as well are difficult to dispose of, because of the "chemical" hazard problems.

    In fact I predict that "gas" powered transportation is here to stay for an long time; as long as the economics stay the same or even improve.

    I also like to add that this country is way behind other civilized countries which spent less on the "military" or "wars" or "walls" like us and can therefore spent that money on "high speed" rail and commuter trains and up to date transportation such as airports as well high speed ferries and other infrastructure etc., which will reduce congestion on our highways and cities.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Factor in replacement cost of an EV battery and an electric car is a lot more expensive to drive than a high mpg gasoline car. They bury numbers making calculationd hard but I used the Chevy Volt battery costing $5000 to replace after 100,000 miles. That is .05 cents a mile. A 200 mile trip cost $10 plus cost of electricity. A 200 mile trip in a Ford Fiesta at $2.50 a gallon cost $12.50 . The big difference being amortising the $4500 battery cost. That will kill the resale value of the Chevy Volt with cars hitting the market at close to end of battery life. The ultimate solution for the planet would be mandated universal batteries and universal battery changing stations. A person would never have to buy a battery and range and mobility would be unlimited. Eliminate burning 20,000,000 gallons of gasoline a day and the resulting pollution.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Electric Vehicles now are best suited for an urban commuter environment. Yes they'll have competition from cheap gasoline, but in places like Boston I expect that they'll catch on quicker than out west or in Florida where tourists like to drive longer distances. If you drive 10,000 miles a year, they have a 10 year life.

    Many more affluent people will continue to buy them because they are environmentally conscious.

    Then there is the Netherlands:

    The Netherlands Just Got One Step Closer to Eliminating Polluting Vehicles

    Dank je

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    Electric Vehicles now are best suited for an urban commuter environment. Yes they'll have competition from cheap gasoline, but in places like Boston I expect that they'll catch on quicker than out west or in Florida where tourists like to drive longer distances. If you drive 10,000 miles a year, they have a 10 year life.

    Many more affluent people will continue to buy them because they are environmentally conscious.

    Then there is the Netherlands:

    The Netherlands Just Got One Step Closer to Eliminating Polluting Vehicles

    Dank je

    Geen dank, it is just wishful thinking just like Trump. Don't forget this is not all about "electric" cars. They've had LPG cars since I was a kid as well trucks and vans. Also diesel is very popular over there (clean diesel). Sure they have plenty of Tesla's which are mostly used as "cab's" at Schiphol and in the city. I doubt if the Ferrari owners (plenty of them) will drop their cars; the Autobahn in Germany is still free from speed limits. But in the Netherlands itself you have to be extremely careful because "photo" boxes are everywhere and you get an steep bill sent to your home. So people there don't take this "proposal" too serious anyway; the small cars there are not polluting much and cost a lot less than an Tesla. So I don't think anything will pass related to eliminating "polluting" vehicles. It will be just as in California; strict emission standards and APK , (Dutch mandatory periodic vehicle inspection and emission inspection) which includes all forms of power sources.
  • Independent
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    much like the fallacy of hydrogen an infrastructure must still be set up for electric vehicles. whether it is charging stations or chargers in municipal and/or private parking lots the infrastructure must still be built. and imo it will take batteries capable of long service life as well as long travel distance on a charge (300-400 miles minimum) to make electric vehicles viable outside of metropolitan transportation.

    but really it doesn't matter. the problem lies with a lack of a coherent transportation plan. instead of taking the lead government defers to the private sector whose goal is not to provide transportation but to make money while providing as little service as possible. if government took the lead with the private sector in the inferior position perhaps coherent policy could be formulated. alas the myth of the non-existent free market solving everything and allocating resources efficiently continues to smother the country.

    here is a small idea: why not clean diesel-electric?

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Diesel Electric Solar, Friends son is getting his doctorate in physical chemistry for a cheap way to release hydrogen from water. Got a 6 year fully paid ride.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Kenosha, WI
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    MSN:CNBC: Op-Ed: Gas stations are going away sooner than you think

    Traditional city gas stations will disappear from the urban environment as all electric vehicles become commonplace in the city.

    "To really jump start electric vehicle use, we need to stop focusing on wired super charging at gas stations and focus more on wireless charging everywhere else. Because people aren't going to go a place to charge. They're going to charge at the places they go."

    That's right...where people shop (e.g. supermarkets) to where they park their cars (commuter train stations) people will be able to charge their cars wirelessly. The typical commuter has a round trip of much less than 200 miles, the average range of EVs as they are called.

    I read a report that you cannot find a gas station in the downtown area of Boston, for example, because the land has more potential for other commercial ventures. It will further accelerate the EV market for commuters.

    Wireless charging is something that might have defied the imagination a few years ago but it is here now and the technology is getting better every day.

    More jobs gone by the wayside...especially in Oregon and New Jersey where you are not allowed to pump your own gas.

    One would think that our automakers would have at least 1/2 of a brain. They're still producing vehicles that only achieve 15 miles per gallon. These idiots must have totally forgotten about gas shortages of the past. At sometime in our future, it'll happen again, just because we have an oil glut now doesn't mean we should be using all of it up today. People tend to forget history, and also forget we have a finite amount of coal and oil.

    youtube.com/watch?v=G7SnaMphvug

    youtube.com/watch?v=hmG5KcinVSI