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Store closings

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    Same old rant from me since I came here. Cheaper, faster and easier is the operating principle of the financial system. That doesn't create long term institutional job providing businesses. It produces a system of maximising profits and cashing out. People always used to say the three most important things for a successful business are location, location, location. The three most important things for a society are regulation, regulation, regulation. 30 years of the right wing blaming big government and regulations for all the economic problems and the Democratic Party swinging right has not been good for the country. Let the economic system that works so well to institutionalize NASCAR, NBA, MLB, NHL & NFL be a model for the country.
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    Dockadams Wrote:
    Dutch Wrote:
    Dockadams Wrote: Speaking of store closings, I skipped over internet news a day or two ago, it suggested many auto parts retail stores might be closing in the near future as the older cars and trucks on the road gradually disappear, after all, how many people know how or want to try to work on the newer cars occupying our roads these days. You'd need an engineer's degree to figure out how to change a headlight on some of these cars. Automakers are manufacturing cars that cannot be worked on by regular people these days. Plus you'd need $35,000 worth of tools to attempt a repair.

    Dock sorry to say,here in FL you still see plenty of old Chevy's, Cadillacs, Camero's etc. However if you buy a certain range of cars like Porsche, BMW, then I have all the testers you need as well tools for an lot less than $35K. Yes I have an engineers degree in aircraft!! Sorry to say that all the newer cars because of all the gadgets are just like on planes; if it does not work "replace" nowadays it is no longer "repairable". China will pump out more print boards than ever. Companies like ASML ( Dutch) will make/design the machines/robots to make these electronic things; that is the future. Thus less jobs also in car repair unless you are good in using computer analyses.

    FL is little Cuba? I didn't know that?

    Oh yeah, what's iridium? Iridium spark plugs? Huh? Longer lasting than platinum. Cost twice as much. But who cares? I can't even see the spark plugs on my car. Anyway, cars made these days are no longer "user serviceable". I'm a former auto tech, my cert. expired in 1995, I had over $35K invested in tools, and it still wasn't enough. Some tools I owned were classified as "shop tools", that means most technicians were not required to own them and the shop you worked for supplied it.

    I can see retail auto parts dwindling though, most do it yourselfers don't have the know how and don't want to have to buy those specialized tools to make some repairs. I can see growth in specialized auto repair areas though, because of that reason. Advance auto has two counters, one retail sales, and a contractor/fleet sales, so they're a bit ahead of this game.

    Yes Dock this is little Cuba here; no inspections on cars, let alone emission inspections. Yes smoking school buses and no one uses signal lights is the fashion here, as well an corrupt, polluting GOP governor who stole millions in the healthcare hospitals and then became governor. Hoeray, long live the "kings" Scott and Trump.
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    Creative destruction at work. No, the workers will not be retrained. There will not be good paying jobs coming down the pike that will equal the production created from the end of the civil war to the 1940's. Ain't happening.

    Servant/superstar economy is arriving. Masses of people servicing masses of people at low wages combined with few superstars servicing the rentier/wealthy.

    The middle class is dissolving before our eyes because that is what creative destruction and capitalism does.

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    Chet Ruminski Wrote: Same old rant from me since I came here. Cheaper, faster and easier is the operating principle of the financial system. That doesn't create long term institutional job providing businesses. It produces a system of maximising profits and cashing out. People always used to say the three most important things for a successful business are location, location, location. The three most important things for a society are regulation, regulation, regulation. 30 years of the right wing blaming big government and regulations for all the economic problems and the Democratic Party swinging right has not been good for the country. Let the economic system that works so well to institutionalize NASCAR, NBA, MLB, NHL & NFL be a model for the country.

    Next thing you know, all the burger joints will have robots serving up your bag lunches.

    I recall when Chrysler left Kenosha, if you had a job with them, you could relocate, but how many people would have wanted to uproot families and follow? Now the city and state are left to deal with the pollution this auto giant left behind.

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    Dockadams Wrote:
    Chet Ruminski Wrote: Same old rant from me since I came here. Cheaper, faster and easier is the operating principle of the financial system. That doesn't create long term institutional job providing businesses. It produces a system of maximising profits and cashing out. People always used to say the three most important things for a successful business are location, location, location. The three most important things for a society are regulation, regulation, regulation. 30 years of the right wing blaming big government and regulations for all the economic problems and the Democratic Party swinging right has not been good for the country. Let the economic system that works so well to institutionalize NASCAR, NBA, MLB, NHL & NFL be a model for the country.

    Next thing you know, all the burger joints will have robots serving up your bag lunches.

    I recall when Chrysler left Kenosha, if you had a job with them, you could relocate, but how many people would have wanted to uproot families and follow? Now the city and state are left to deal with the pollution this auto giant left behind.

    But our great "leader" has no idea what is happening in this country; he rather shouts "propaganda"
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    "Barely a quarter into 2017, year-to-date retail store closings have already surpassed those of 2008," the report says.

    money.cnn.com/2017/04/22/news/credit-su...

    Stores closing at new record rates.

    Nobody likes to go shopping store to store these days.

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    Holy cow, check out the graph in this BI link.

    msn.com/en-us/money/companies/more-than...

    "Retailers are closing thousands of stores following years of declines in sales and customer traffic.

    We compiled a list of the 6,375 closures that have been announced so far in 2017." (see above)

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    Business Insider: Amazon is hiring 50,000 people today — here's how to get a job

    This is the market at work. People's buying preferences have dictated this trend.

    Amazon is going on a hiring spree and you have one day to take advantage of it.

    On Wednesday 2 August, Amazon is hosting its so-called "Jobs Day" at twelve of its warehouses across the US.

    Unemployed coal miners...here's some jobs for you...

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    Oh why would a coal miner want to lower his standards by accepting a $10 an hour job sorting packages?

    An expedited cargo owner/operator has made runs from Chicago to Indianapolis and was paid $280 once and dead-headed back to Chicago after a delivery. The next week, the expedited driver does the same exact run, but is only paid $150. The owner operator complains to the operations manager about his take citing the amount of money he was paid the previous week. The operations manager tells the owner operator that something is better than nothing, even though the driver made much less than before.

    A day will come when the economy once again takes a bad turn, and places like Amazon will be laying off hundreds if not thousands because people will begin holding onto their purse strings tighter and not spending like they did previously. Maybe as long as America has a steady supply of Chinese made crap, the economy will be good, but by watching Wall Street on a tear right now reminds me of how it's crashed so many times before, because wages are still depressed/stagnant, nobody is getting raises, and corporate America still isn't doing the hiring frenzy like before, in the good old days. The real estate market is slowing too. Which market will it be that takes us into the tank again?

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    Despair is not inevitable. Money like matter can't be destroyed. The tax system and the government have to put money back into the economy. The tax system simply has to tax stagnated money. It is against the law to dam up a water supply to prevent people downstream from using it. It should be against the law to do the same thing with money. Tax stagnated money that is taken out of the economy. Taking money out of the economy is the same thing as somebody buying all the NFL footballs or NASCAR tires and locking them up. Money has to be kept in the economy and moving. High velocity money is prosperity for everybody.
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    Chet Ruminski Wrote: Despair is not inevitable. Money like matter can't be destroyed. The tax system and the government have to put money back into the economy. The tax system simply has to tax stagnated money. It is against the law to dam up a water supply to prevent people downstream from using it. It should be against the law to do the same thing with money. Tax stagnated money that is taken out of the economy. Taking money out of the economy is the same thing as somebody buying all the NFL footballs or NASCAR tires and locking them up. Money has to be kept in the economy and moving. High velocity money is prosperity for everybody.
    Chet, guess how much "stagnated " money sits with the "billionaires" here. If they buy "luxury goods" I bet it is not from here. Their yachts are built in Italy or the Netherlands; Their super cars in Italy; all the luxury in their homes also from Europe. Their clothes etc. from France or Italy. The rest of their junk from China. So tax the rich at least with 60%, so the money stays here; like they do in Europe.
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    The topic is store closings Chet. At one time all those big mall stores and big box stores put the Mom and Pop shops out of business. Now those stores too are feeling the pressure from online internet sales. Those big stores that have survived are doing their own internet sales competing with Amazon. I shop at many online stores besides Amazon.

    It is market conditions and technology (robots if you like) that are changing the landscape of shopping. The customers are the biggest beneficiaries because they can shop at the convenience of their computer or smartphone. It is a tremendous time saver. It gives me more time to go fishing.

    Oh and FedEx, UPS and the USPS drivers also benefit with job security, but I have no idea what they are paid or what benefits they are offered. I suppose I could look it up but I don't really care as long as they deliver my goods on time. They don't seem to have a shortage of drivers so the market must be working.

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    Schmidt Wrote:

    The topic is store closings Chet. At one time all those big mall stores and big box stores put the Mom and Pop shops out of business. Now those stores too are feeling the pressure from online internet sales. Those big stores that have survived are doing their own internet sales competing with Amazon. I shop at many online stores besides Amazon.

    It is market conditions and technology (robots if you like) that are changing the landscape of shopping. The customers are the biggest beneficiaries because they can shop at the convenience of their computer or smartphone. It is a tremendous time saver. It gives me more time to go fishing.

    Oh and FedEx, UPS and the USPS drivers also benefit with job security, but I have no idea what they are paid or what benefits they are offered. I suppose I could look it up but I don't really care as long as they deliver my goods on time. They don't seem to have a shortage of drivers so the market must be working.

    Schmidt; question: Why is this not happening in Europe; all the shops are doing fine there including the small shops. Furthermore here in Ft.Myers, the Edison Mall has half the stores boarded up. Is this only an American problem?
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    I have no idea what they are paid or what benefits they are offered. I suppose I could look it up but I don't really care as long as they deliver my goods on time

    Well, someone should care, I already gave an example of what happened when a company (unnamed) sent a driver to do a run for less money than he had been earning previously. What happens is that these companies that abuse drivers like this will take advantage of them in the future, corporations like Amazon hire independents to haul their stuff, I most recently had a chat with a FEDEX independent who told me he gets $7 per delivery, he averages between 150-200 deliveries a day, he has to move his ass to make any money doing so. USPS workers are union, FEDEX is not, UPS is union too.

    There'll come a time when these online retailers won't have enough transporters to haul their stuff, and you can say goodbye to expedited delivery, either that, or your packages won't arrive on time, and the online retailers will be backlogged with orders they can't deliver.

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    Schmidt Wrote:

    The topic is store closings Chet. At one time all those big mall stores and big box stores put the Mom and Pop shops out of business. Now those stores too are feeling the pressure from online internet sales. Those big stores that have survived are doing their own internet sales competing with Amazon. I shop at many online stores besides Amazon.

    It is market conditions and technology (robots if you like) that are changing the landscape of shopping. The customers are the biggest beneficiaries because they can shop at the convenience of their computer or smartphone. It is a tremendous time saver. It gives me more time to go fishing.

    Oh and FedEx, UPS and the USPS drivers also benefit with job security, but I have no idea what they are paid or what benefits they are offered. I suppose I could look it up but I don't really care as long as they deliver my goods on time. They don't seem to have a shortage of drivers so the market must be working.

    '

    "The topic is store closings Chet." Schmidt, Store closings are the result of a failing economy. But you appear to think that whatever happens is the simply the result of a normally functioning economy. Amazon is hiring 50,000 people because online shopping has put 500 000 people out of work. That is acceptable to a right wing republican but it is anathema to a progressive. What you call the function of market conditions is an abuse open the working class. Store closings is not a subject within itself. It is symptomatic of a failed economic policy. The driver that delivers your packages on time is suffering deteriorating conditions.