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Store closings

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    Gander Mountain files for chapter 11 bankruptcy, many media outlets are saying 32 stores nationwide are closing, but one Fox news agency claims 126 stores are closing, who to believe? The Indianapolis Star has a piece where the new owner disavows those claims by MSM.

    if you can stand the popups,

    indystar.com/story/news/2017/05/07/gand...

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    As I said before, this is a trend due to market conditions and changing demographics. Online shopping has become easier and easier, as customers can view the products, read reviews, buy them at a discount, often with free shipping. If they don't like it, they can return it...sometimes also with free return shipping.

    For working parents whose time is so consumed with work and other activities, and just do not have the time to shop in malls, online shopping has become a blessing...a time saver and productivity enhancer.

    Finally, you cannot blame China for the job losses. The US is a world leader in this online shopping trend. The best we can do is offer job retraining programs to those workers who have lost jobs...much the same as job retraining for coal miners who lost their jobs.

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    Reviews are worth their weight in gold. While standing in X retail store, you can't ask and/or hear 78 people talk about "their Dyson vacuum" and explain their happiness. That's what is strangling retail. People can get information 24/7.
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    On Gander Mountain,

    Well, I'm not a gun hugger, but can people buy rifles and pistols through the internets (internets courtesy of Bush 43)?

    What about a canoe or a boat with paddles? does FEDEX deliver those? What about UPS, will they deliver long guns to my door? Who delivers 900 pound boat motors?

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    Fed ex, UPS, DHL and others will deliver almost anything if the shipper or consignee are willing to pay the fee. They all have freight divisions for larger or heavier items.
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    I see now how buyers of guns online do it. They befriend someone who has a FFL permit, the person buys the gun and has it sent to or shipped to the FFL holder, then they go pick up their gun from the holder.

    Don't know if someone would want to pay $2,000 for a $800 canoe, but I guess some would. When a store as big as that folds, buyers usually go to the next dealer, whose sales might spike because of another closing.

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    Many watch a closing store because as close dates approach the discounts increase. The week of a closing large discounts can be realized. The longer you wait increases the likelihood that wanted items are gone. If you just want bargains be patient because the last few days can have 80 + % discounts.

    Roll the dice.

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    Well, if I had the green stamps, I would buy thousands, or maybe hundreds of dollars at Gander on camping stuff. I love to camp, but don't even have a camper or a dependable enough vehicle to get to a camp ground. The best we can do right now is go to a city park and burn hot dogs and burgers on a grill with 300 people walking around.

    I see Cabela's and some other retailers, about 10, are in trouble too. Maybe the Don can help the thousands of workers these closings will affect. But I doubt it, he seems bent on helping coal miners and banging the war drum, hey, there's an idea, go to war, people will be begging for a job in the armed forces.

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    Actually when stores close just the opposite happens. They call in "liquidators" who go through the stores inventory and raise all the prices to (occasionally) even higher than suggested retail then offer 20% off for the first few weeks while all the suckers pay more than the merchandise sold for before the sale. By the time the discount it high enough to be meaningful all the good stuff has been sold (at inflated prices) and mostly junk is left. It's the old shell game - corporations are not people, corporations always win in the end and the people always lose.
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    Yeah, I sort of believe that.

    We have a building materials store in my town, they're spread across Illinois and Wisconsin too. They put up their 11% rebate ads and attract masses to their stores. I did some checking, a 1000 watt bug zapper before the 11% rebate was $36.99, after the rebate sale went into effect, the price jumped to $42.99, and the rebates are actually merchandise credits, not cash, to be used in their stores only. People right now are getting sucked in by mother's day deals, as reported on MSM last night.

    The old saying is true, there's a sucker born every minute.

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    Another aspect of online shopping is price comparison. When I had recently researched a camera that I wanted, I just put the model number into Google and then saw all the deals and reviews, many of them from Amazon affiliated sites. So even if a store has marked up items in advance of a sale, a savvy buyer who has done his homework will know what is a real deal. Some offer free shipping.
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    Speaking of store closings, I skipped over internet news a day or two ago, it suggested many auto parts retail stores might be closing in the near future as the older cars and trucks on the road gradually disappear, after all, how many people know how or want to try to work on the newer cars occupying our roads these days. You'd need an engineer's degree to figure out how to change a headlight on some of these cars. Automakers are manufacturing cars that cannot be worked on by regular people these days. Plus you'd need $35,000 worth of tools to attempt a repair.
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    Trivia

    Guess who the nation's 3 largest retailers are.....

    Amazon

    Wal-Mart

    QVC

    Surprised me.

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    Dockadams Wrote: Speaking of store closings, I skipped over internet news a day or two ago, it suggested many auto parts retail stores might be closing in the near future as the older cars and trucks on the road gradually disappear, after all, how many people know how or want to try to work on the newer cars occupying our roads these days. You'd need an engineer's degree to figure out how to change a headlight on some of these cars. Automakers are manufacturing cars that cannot be worked on by regular people these days. Plus you'd need $35,000 worth of tools to attempt a repair.

    Dock sorry to say,here in FL you still see plenty of old Chevy's, Cadillacs, Camero's etc. However if you buy a certain range of cars like Porsche, BMW, then I have all the testers you need as well tools for an lot less than $35K. Yes I have an engineers degree in aircraft!! Sorry to say that all the newer cars because of all the gadgets are just like on planes; if it does not work "replace" nowadays it is no longer "repairable". China will pump out more print boards than ever. Companies like ASML ( Dutch) will make/design the machines/robots to make these electronic things; that is the future. Thus less jobs also in car repair unless you are good in using computer analyses.

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    Dutch Wrote:
    Dockadams Wrote: Speaking of store closings, I skipped over internet news a day or two ago, it suggested many auto parts retail stores might be closing in the near future as the older cars and trucks on the road gradually disappear, after all, how many people know how or want to try to work on the newer cars occupying our roads these days. You'd need an engineer's degree to figure out how to change a headlight on some of these cars. Automakers are manufacturing cars that cannot be worked on by regular people these days. Plus you'd need $35,000 worth of tools to attempt a repair.

    Dock sorry to say,here in FL you still see plenty of old Chevy's, Cadillacs, Camero's etc. However if you buy a certain range of cars like Porsche, BMW, then I have all the testers you need as well tools for an lot less than $35K. Yes I have an engineers degree in aircraft!! Sorry to say that all the newer cars because of all the gadgets are just like on planes; if it does not work "replace" nowadays it is no longer "repairable". China will pump out more print boards than ever. Companies like ASML ( Dutch) will make/design the machines/robots to make these electronic things; that is the future. Thus less jobs also in car repair unless you are good in using computer analyses.

    FL is little Cuba? I didn't know that?

    Oh yeah, what's iridium? Iridium spark plugs? Huh? Longer lasting than platinum. Cost twice as much. But who cares? I can't even see the spark plugs on my car. Anyway, cars made these days are no longer "user serviceable". I'm a former auto tech, my cert. expired in 1995, I had over $35K invested in tools, and it still wasn't enough. Some tools I owned were classified as "shop tools", that means most technicians were not required to own them and the shop you worked for supplied it.

    I can see retail auto parts dwindling though, most do it yourselfers don't have the know how and don't want to have to buy those specialized tools to make some repairs. I can see growth in specialized auto repair areas though, because of that reason. Advance auto has two counters, one retail sales, and a contractor/fleet sales, so they're a bit ahead of this game.