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Technology taking jobs?

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  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Technology can't take all the jobs in a prospering economy. The economy now is essentially flat but the unemployment rate is close to 4%. Right now there is a balance of jobs. The initial capitalization of robotics would probably prohibits robotic start ups.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    I can usually follow your line of thought regardless if I agree with it or not, but I am a little confused with this post.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    The country is at full employment so there is no net loss of jobs to robotics or technology.

    If output would increase there would not be a linear response from robots and technology. It costs to much to capitalize a startup robotics operated business. Human labor is less risky and cheaper than robots. A robotic startup would would require capitalising robots that last 30 or more years.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    "[Machines are] always polite, they always upsell, they never take a vacation, they never show up late, there's never a slip-and-fall, or an age, sex, or race discrimination case." -- Andrew Puzder, Trump's nominee for Labor Secretary

    30 years??? Robots, like all appliances in your kitchen, your cell phone, your computer, etc. will have a short life span because they will be replaced by even better robots. Once a robot takes away a job, it is not coming back. However, we can appreciate that it provides new jobs to people who build, run and maintain robots. It's only competition is low wage workers overseas, but even those workers are losing out to machines.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    Chet Ruminski Wrote: The country is at full employment so there is no net loss of jobs to robotics or technology.

    Robotics and other technological advances most certainly are replacing many jobs, but humans are adaptable and must adapt to survive.

    The assembly line jobs of only a couple decades ago are long gone and will never come back. As Schmidt said, "[o]nce a robot takes away a job, it is not coming back." The same goes with manually intensive jobs like mining and construction. Fewer and fewer humans are required to do a task and that is only going to become more evident as we move forward.

    Chet Ruminski Wrote: If output would increase there would not be a linear response from robots and technology. It costs to much to capitalize a startup robotics operated business. Human labor is less risky and cheaper than robots. A robotic startup would would require capitalising robots that last 30 or more years.

    As Schmidt and many other people have pointed out many times - robots can't get sick and will never ask to take a vacation. How is that more risky and cheaper than humans? Do you really think that business leaders in this capitalistic society wouldn't be using human beings to complete tasks if they concluded it would increase their profit margins?

    Robots are used because they are more reliable than humans. They make far fewer (if any) mistakes, can't get hurt on the job and go on disability, and can still complete a task 1,000 times faster than a human can.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    As I said, start ups will be hardpressed to capitalize robots. Banks and other financing will be reluctant to loan on a robot start up. Absolutely no doubt that a proven concept will acquire financing. I am talking about real life business financing.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    "Robotics startups often have a tougher time attracting funding than their software counterparts because of higher development costs.

    ?We are also looking for a ballpark estimate of the total amount of capital being sought because of the long lead time it takes to bring a robotics-related product to market,? said Mr. Becker."

    roboticsbusinessreview.com/the_funding_...

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    Chet Ruminski Wrote: As I said, start ups will be hardpressed to capitalize robots. Banks and other financing will be reluctant to loan on a robot start up. Absolutely no doubt that a proven concept will acquire financing. I am talking about real life business financing.

    Huh?

    There are plenty of companies - Google, Boston Dynamics, and sams AG (to name a few) - that already make robots and other highly technical machinery. Banks have been and will continue to be more than willing to offer them very generous lines of credit to keep making those machines because they have proven themselves to be highly profitable.

    Anyone getting into a robotic startup now better have one hell of an awesome idea because they are a little late to the party.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    We can look at any industry and see automation, maybe not true 100 percent robots in that sense, but computerization of equipment and tasks for improved productivity. The agricultural, dairy and meat industries have come a long way in harvesting grains, vegetables and fruits with machines, milking cows and processing the milk with machines, and butchering cattle in an assembly line. Countless workers have lost their jobs. You can Google any facet of the above and find YouTube videos of the machines in action.

    One activity that has thus far eluded them is apple picking for the sale of apples in grocery stores (as opposed to making cider). But soon even those apples will be hand picked with care by machines and for good reason:

    The rise of the apple picking robots

    There aren't enough migrant workers to pick apples for supermarkets.

    "In combination with the decrease in immigration from Mexico, farm labor has been lacking for years. “Labor has been a challenge,” says David Douglas of Douglas Fruit. “There aren’t enough local workers. And it’s no secret that the majority of the work has been done by Hispanics.”"

    Small orchards will probably still employ apple picking workers, but eventually once the technology advances further, even they will either have to adapt or be put out of business. Consider this:

    “1,500 years ago, 50 percent of the population worked in agriculture. Now, only 2 percent do." That last 2 percent includes apple pickers today.

  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Thank God people can still (for now) make hamburgers.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Yes the restaurant business is less likely to be robotized for now, but certain fast food restaurants have partially gone down that path. Fast is the right word.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Like I said many times "action creates reaction" thus we ourselves have also become robots; the thinking is done for us!!

    If we don't know something we look it up on our computers; schools already don't teach but tell kids to look it up.

    Furthermore the churches, the military and government makes lots of non thinking or non educated "robots" of willing "believers" which opens the way like it is already done under Trump "follow" the leader and salute him the Hitler way.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Dutch -- You make a good point about robots doing the thinking for us. As we both have grown up learning math the hard way, graduating from long hand math to slide rules, then calculators, and finally computers, I have a sense of approximate values, a kind of mental arithmetic on the upper and lower bounds of a realistic outcome. For many young people who have never had that experience and have only seen numbers generated out of the computer, they have a hard time differentiating a totally bogus number. If it comes out of the computer it must be right.

    Maps are another thing. I like looking at paper maps in our travels across the country as it gives me a feel for the total journey and travel times to various cities for lunch breaks and such. For those using Google maps with voice instructions on where to turn, etc. much of that feel is lost, both in terms of distance and direction. I would say "turn north at the intersection" while the cellphone instructions will say right or left. Make one wrong turn and you are screwed up.

    Also when politicians talk about dollars or numbers of jobs created or saved, it seems people don't really think about their significance. Trump brags about saving 800 jobs at Carrier or 700 hundred jobs at Ford, and it's a big deal that gets lots of media attention. President Obama saved millions of jobs with the GM bail-out that Republicans largely opposed as big government interfering in the free market. Carrier gets tax subsidies from the good taxpayers of Indiana, and we don't know yet what tax incentives were given to Ford. In any case it's all peanuts compared to the big picture where Obama talks in the millions. Trump's numbers in the hundreds are chunk change in that reality.

    I wonder how many dozen coal mining jobs he'll brag about bringing back.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    Dutch -- You make a good point about robots doing the thinking for us. As we both have grown up learning math the hard way, graduating from long hand math to slide rules, then calculators, and finally computers, I have a sense of approximate values, a kind of mental arithmetic on the upper and lower bounds of a realistic outcome. For many young people who have never had that experience and have only seen numbers generated out of the computer, they have a hard time differentiating a totally bogus number. If it comes out of the computer it must be right.

    Maps are another thing. I like looking at paper maps in our travels across the country as it gives me a feel for the total journey and travel times to various cities for lunch breaks and such. For those using Google maps with voice instructions on where to turn, etc. much of that feel is lost, both in terms of distance and direction. I would say "turn north at the intersection" while the cellphone instructions will say right or left. Make one wrong turn and you are screwed up.

    Also when politicians talk about dollars or numbers of jobs created or saved, it seems people don't really think about their significance. Trump brags about saving 800 jobs at Carrier or 700 hundred jobs at Ford, and it's a big deal that gets lots of media attention. President Obama saved millions of jobs with the GM bail-out that Republicans largely opposed as big government interfering in the free market. Carrier gets tax subsidies from the good taxpayers of Indiana, and we don't know yet what tax incentives were given to Ford. In any case it's all peanuts compared to the big picture where Obama talks in the millions. Trump's numbers in the hundreds are chunk change in that reality.

    I wonder how many dozen coal mining jobs he'll brag about bringing back.

    Yes, in the first place education is not any more as it used to be. I guess you and I had to find out the hard way how things work and stash it into your brain. The present youth just looks it up. I started from the ground up, probably just like you, and took nothing for granted. Kids nowadays don't have that experience; climbing up because you have to use your brains is an thing of the past. Also filling your brain with useless matter like "church or army stuff" lowers the capacity to fill it with useful stuff. Sometimes I look at the series Yeapardy ; the questions they have and then filling your brain with answers which have no relevance at all on your life or use in your life is ridiculous. Like in which movie of 1956 so and so played etc. Strange country indeed. but yeah bring the coal mines back without health insurance looks to me an brilliant idea indeed. However you can do that also with robots or train "humans" as such.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Okay, I don't want to stereotype any particular demographic, particular young people. I have hired some very good young people out of college that would not fit that mold. However, before hiring them I subjected them to rigorous vetting including summer jobs. I think I can claim over a 90 percent success in that regard, but as Chet points out, my rigorous selection process that valued intellectual curiosity and other traits left many graduates in the bottom tier without jobs out of college. That can take a heavy toll on young people's psyche for the rest of their lives. While Carlitos' Job Guarantee might help some, for those working at jobs outside of their selected profession, the mental anguish can have lasting effects. I don't have an easy answer. Corporations should have some role as they have the resources for apprenticeships or other jobs, but there are limitations.