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Sanders as Democratic Capitalist

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  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Dallas, TX
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    Our man at Forbes.com and the leading DFW progressive economist, Texas Christian University's Professor John Harvey delivered this yesterday:

    Bernie Sanders as Democratic Capitalist

    In short, if you believe in the return of limited government, competitive markets, and personal responsibility, you should probably vote for Bernie Sanders. As a mainstream Chicago School economist has noted, on the basis of 'revealed preferences,' Bernie is the most pro-market candidate.

    Organized political bribery is the greatest affront to limited government, competitive markets, and personal responsibility in our time.

    Single payer healthcare and college education would actually reduce sprawling government overreach and waste that negatively impacts personal freedom and the economy, even with Sanders' system of new taxes (which I oppose but still support Sanders).

    The two-tiered system of justice in this country does not promote or reinforce accountability. When elites commit crimes and walk away unpunished, there is a trickle down effect on society that undermines personal responsibility. Meanwhile, the Deficit Terrorism by elites actively undermines those taking personal responsibility.

    When the consumer is sovereign, markets work to be competitive, reducing economic rents by elites and inequalities. The reverse works true when Big Business is sovereign and consumers are captives of non-competitive markets.

    President Sanders would put people, consumers, and labor first. Sales will boom and the capitalist development process will warmly benefit from the expansion of output and competition.

    The Sanders Revolution is a defense of the American way of life against the failure of the past 40 years of neoliberal rule that has actively attacked the economy, the consumer, the worker, the family, and the entrepreneur.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Pensacola, FL
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    Sanders in a word, fair. The US only has remnants of Capitslism and an economy. Both terms imply continuity. The life blood of an economy is money. Money was created to facilitate trade in goods and services. The current system is focused on hoarding money thereby creating servitude. Slavery. A government is supposed to protect citizens. Graduating college with a 200 thousand dollar lien is indebted servitude. There is no reasonable explanation for turning college that once was almost free into a lifetime debt. It is destruction of an economy and capitalism. It is hoarding more than a trillion and growing dollars. The same analysis applies to trade. Trade policies for whatever mechanism are negotiated not to facilitate trade but to create a profit. It may be hard for people to understand but the object of trade is not to put the other person out of business but to be in business with. Competition and supply/demand are aberrations of an ongoing and continuing economy. We are suffering the results of years of individualism especially inflated by the GOP. There needs to be an effort to explain that winning and taking the ball out of the game ends the game. Sanders is making that point.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    My perspective is more global in nature having lived and traveled in foreign countries. I can appreciate much of the European "socialistic" forms of government, but I also realize that these forms of government that blend social demands with capitalism were not born over night. They evolved from kingdoms to parliamentary forms of government today that do indeed put a high value on social issues while also recognizing that capitalism is essential for economic survival. The post World War II Europe has seen beneficail incremental change over time largely in response to the will of their people. Do they have inequality? Yes, but I would not say that they have extreme poverty, and certainly nothing of the type that you would find in other parts of the world.

    In the late 1990s until the end of 2002 I lived in Venezuela and got to witness first hand Hugo Chavez's "Bolivarian Revolution" take shape. He was a charismatic populist politician who was able to motivate the masses of people to vote for him in elections. Many of his initial reforms were commendable, but as an ideologue he had little tolerance for criticism, much of it coming from the "elitists", the more affluent college educated middle class who he saw as his enemy. You can read about the changes he made over time, and be the judge yourself, but this is one view of how his Bolivarian Revolution has gone (from Wikipedia):

    Since Hugo Chávez's "socialist revolution" half-dismantled its PDVSA oil giant corporation in 2002 by firing most of its 20,000-strong dissident professional human capital, and imposed stringent currency controls in 2003 in an attempt to prevent capital flight, there have been a steady decline in oil production and exports and a series of stern currency devaluations, disrupting the economy. Further yet, price controls, expropriation of numerous farmlands and all types of industries (including cattle and poultry, most of those eventually laid to waste), and other disputable government policies including a near-total freeze on any access to foreign currency at reasonable 'official' interchange rates, have caused severe shortages in Venezuela and steep price rises of all types of supplies and goods, including foodstuffs, household consumables, spare parts, tools, chemical, pharmaceutical and medical supplies, etc. forcing many manufacturers to either cut production, restrict product lines, close down, or ultimately abandon the country, as has been the case with several technology firms, including most automobile makers. In 2015, Venezuela had over 100% inflation - the highest in the world and the highest in the country's history- and in 2016, inflation was expected to reach 700%.

    Part of his revolution was the complete control of the media. In 2012 despite the decline in the living standards of his people, there was a segment of the population that still revered him. Take a look at the words of his supporters in these political posters saying why they still support President Chavez after almost 14 years in power: Venezuelans Explain Why They Support the Bolivarian Revolution. Here are a few of the translations:

    "I have always voted for Chavez because there is no one else like him, who doesn't fear anything, who speaks directly. Socialism is having a broad mind, full of wisdom, studying".

    "We love Chavez because he is the president who has given the most power to the people. We love you."

    "We vote for Chavez because he takes the needs of the people into consideration, and that's why he created the missions - as help and improvement - long live our comandante"

    "I vote for Chavez because he has shown (us) socialism, and solidarity for the people of Venezuela, and Chavez is homeland”.

    "I'm voting for the Bolivarian Revolution ..."for the future, for equality, and for social rights, this is why I vote for Chavez".

    "Why I vote for Chavez: because he opened our eyes to the truth. I love Chavez, my leader."

    "I'm voting for Hugo Chavez "so that there is social equality and our revolution continues to advance".

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    Okay you should go to the above link and really look at the faces of the people behind those quotes. They are good ordinary Venezuelans. Despite the fact that their economy is in the toilet, that most all the educated "elitists" have fled the country, they remain 100 percent behind their beloved man.

    Does any of this sound familiar?

  • Liberal
    Independent
    Durham, NH
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    The Emperor has no clothes (but they are all the finest quality, best tailored, most expensive and made in China)?
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Carlitos Wrote:

    Our man at Forbes.com and the leading DFW progressive economist, Texas Christian University's Professor John Harvey delivered this yesterday:

    Bernie Sanders as Democratic Capitalist

    In short, if you believe in the return of limited government, competitive markets, and personal responsibility, you should probably vote for Bernie Sanders. As a mainstream Chicago School economist has noted, on the basis of 'revealed preferences,' Bernie is the most pro-market candidate.

    On June 8, 2005 on Vermont Public Radio, Bernie Sanders said this:

    Today, Congressman Bernie Sanders will urge his colleagues in the U.S. House to support a plan to have the United States withdraw from the World Trade Organization.

    I don't see how withdrawing from the World Trade Organization which has over the years established rules and regulations for fair trade amongst its 162 member countries is consistent with the most "pro-market candidate".

    Carlitos, you are starting to lose perspective if you believe this.

  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Dallas, TX
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    The WTO is not some unicorn progressive organization. I don't know if I support Sanders' stance on removal of the US from membership. But from agriculture to intellectual property to public health, the WTO is decidedly pro-Global North and anti-competition. Pharmaceutical and genome patent protections, for example, are functional legal monopoly protections, which are barriers to trade by definition.

    counterpunch.org/2016/01/01/the-deathbe...