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Number of Individuals Without Health Insurance the Lowest It's Been in Over 30 Years

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  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    Take that Obamacare haters.

    I apologize if that's too harsh, but even with all of the misinformation, lies, and unyielding litigation from the right, Obamacare is working better than anyone ever anticipated. And it's time for those on the right to admit defeat and move on to something else.

    The number of individuals who lack health insurance in this country has fallen below ten percent for the first time since the government started tracking the numbers 33 years ago and we have never seen such a precipitous drop in the numbers of uninsured since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid back in the 1960's.

    acagif

    I hate to spike the football, but this a really big deal. Just think if the red states who so cruelly decided to not expand Medicaid out of spite got on board. We could drive that number even lower.

    It's time for Republicans to stop playing politics and help the people of their state to get health coverage.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    jaredsxtn Wrote:

    Take that Obamacare haters.

    I apologize if that's too harsh, but even with all of the misinformation, lies, and unyielding litigation from the right, Obamacare is working better than anyone ever anticipated. And it's time for those on the right to admit defeat and move on to something else.

    The number of individuals who lack health insurance in this country has fallen below ten percent for the first time since the government started tracking the numbers 33 years ago and we have never seen such a precipitous drop in the numbers of uninsured since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid back in the 1960's.

    acagif

    I hate to spike the football, but this a really big deal. Just think if the red states who so cruelly decided to not expand Medicaid out of spite got on board. We could drive that number even lower.

    It's time for Republicans to stop playing politics and help the people of their state to get health coverage.

    Jared, I hate to say this, but we are running light years behind Europe. The funny thing here is the total inefficiency in the "paper" process. My wife has to fill in about 10 pages of paper at each individual doctor/specialist. Certain doctors still have stacks of manila folders and paper storage. At each doctor we have tell her whole medical history etc. etc. In Europe just a push of a button and every medical specialist has immediately access to all the data. Just show your card and you are being processed. Here they ask you to come an half hour earlier than the appointment just to fill in all the paper work. The medical industry could save billions in efficiency streamlining. Also most medical professionals are not "trained to be flexible" each has its specialists area with blinders on; so likely you have to go from specialist to specialist for the same thing. Some people got very rich due to these in-efficiency's like our crook governor Scott who presided over a group of hospitals in FL.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    I don't disagree with you Dutch, but we have to work with the system that we got for now. I would love nothing more than a single-payer system, but that is politically impossible currently. Hell, we hardly got Obamacare passed when we controlled both the House and Senate. Do you honestly think our "leaders" are even considering going the single-payer route right now?

    That's why I am happy that we have at least dramatically reduced the number of people who had no health coverage at all. It's a baby step, but it's a monumental one at that.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Certainly some of the historical records that go back decades are contained in paper files that may not even be cost effective to digitize. But let me say this. I have had two hospital episodes in the last six years, and all my records are fully digitized. I even have accounts, passwords and access codes to look up all the diagnoses, treatments and prescriptions on my own computer. My full history is all there all the way back to my childhood. At my last hospital stay back in 2009, a nurse came in and asked me my history, which she immediately typed into her computer. She double checked with me at the time to confirm accuracy.

    During my hospital stay earlier this month whenever a nurse came into the room to check my progress or conduct tests or change my drip, she scanned my wrist band and the bar codes on any antibiotic packets to be administered. Everything else was immediately entered into her "computer on wheels"...my blood pressure, temperature, any discomfort experienced...everything. The doctor had immediate access to all this info before he came into the room to visit with me.

    So yes some doctors, hospitals, clinics are slow to convert to digital, but that is certainly not the case for my care givers.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    Certainly some of the historical records that go back decades are contained in paper files that may not even be cost effective to digitize. But let me say this. I have had two hospital episodes in the last six years, and all my records are fully digitized. I even have accounts, passwords and access codes to look up all the diagnoses, treatments and prescriptions on my own computer. My full history is all there all the way back to my childhood. At my last hospital stay back in 2009, a nurse came in and asked me my history, which she immediately typed into her computer. She double checked with me at the time to confirm accuracy.

    During my hospital stay earlier this month whenever a nurse came into the room to check my progress or conduct tests or change my drip, she scanned my wrist band and the bar codes on any antibiotic packets to be administered. Everything else was immediately entered into her "computer on wheels"...my blood pressure, temperature, any discomfort experienced...everything. The doctor had immediate access to all this info before he came into the room to visit with me.

    So yes some doctors, hospitals, clinics are slow to convert to digital, but that is certainly not the case for my care givers.

    Schmidt, great I suggest you move to FL then none of your records are known!! The problem as I see it ; there is no coherent system nation wide; I bet that if you enter another state or hospital that they don't have the same software nor recording system. I lived in several states they all are different. Like you said my wife gets all her history right on her computer from the Netherlands; when she visits there it is fully automatic and fits back into the system. So you are lucky that you live in a State where they are ahead of the game. So I guess the one who comes up with a worldwide fast accurate digital medical recording system can make fortunes. It should be something like the finger printing system which can be accessed worldwide as used by police/FBI etc.