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the G.I. bill - a lesson from the past

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  • Center Left Democrat
    Democrat
    Flagstaff, AZ
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    On this day in 1944, FDR signed the G.I. bill. The bill provided unemployment insurance for returning servicemen, low interest home and business loans, and (most importantly) funding for education.

    Only a small percentage of the money set aside for unemployment insurance was ever used. but the investment in education led to an economic boom that lasted for 30 years after the end of WWII.

    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

    If you move forward to today, the states that spend the most (per pupil ) on education have the highest per capita income. The states that fund education at the lowest level (and Arizona is the worst) lag far behind other states (like Minnesota) in both per capita income and job growth.

    Governor Ducey's latest budget just cut $119 million from higher education, and Scott Walker's budget cut an astounding $300 million from higher education (but left room to spend $250 million for a new arena for a losing basketball team)..

    It's a proven fact that tax cuts do NOT spur economic growth (and Brownbackistan is just one example) - but Rand Paul wants to cut Federal taxes by $2 trillion.

    For the Republican Party to have any credibility at all, it needs to take lessons from the past - and the G.I. bill is a good place to start.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    that guy in Arizona Wrote:

    On this day in 1944, FDR signed the G.I. bill. The bill provided unemployment insurance for returning servicemen, low interest home and business loans, and (most importantly) funding for education.

    Only a small percentage of the money set aside for unemployment insurance was ever used. but the investment in education led to an economic boom that lasted for 30 years after the end of WWII.

    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

    If you move forward to today, the states that spend the most (per pupil ) on education have the highest per capita income. The states that fund education at the lowest level (and Arizona is the worst) lag far behind other states (like Minnesota) in both per capita income and job growth.

    Governor Ducey's latest budget just cut $119 million from higher education, and Scott Walker's budget cut an astounding $300 million from higher education (but left room to spend $250 million for a new arena for a losing basketball team)..

    It's a proven fact that tax cuts do NOT spur economic growth (and Brownbackistan is just one example) - but Rand Paul wants to cut Federal taxes by $2 trillion.

    For the Republican Party to have any credibility at all, it needs to take lessons from the past - and the G.I. bill is a good place to start.

    No, a G.I bill is wrong; I guess you should not promote for kids to participate in wars or reward people who turn into killing robots; there should be a dis-incentive instead to join the forces. Half or more of this country is veteran; be proud of it. Indeed do spent money on some real education not on football stadiums or military indoctrination etc.
  • Center Left Democrat
    Democrat
    Flagstaff, AZ
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    Dutch:

    I agree with you that we shouldn't be promoting wars.

    The value of the G.I bill was that (1) it was an attempt to take care of the folks who had served their country and (2) it recognized that the best way to improve society was to INVEST in education.

    Recent V.A scandals in Phoenix and elsewhere highlight the fact that we need to to a better job of taking care of our veterans, and the attacks on education by the Republican Party clearly shows that their priorities are all wrong.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    that guy in Arizona Wrote:

    Dutch:

    I agree with you that we shouldn't be promoting wars.

    The value of the G.I bill was that (1) it was an attempt to take care of the folks who had served their country and (2) it recognized that the best way to improve society was to INVEST in education.

    Recent V.A scandals in Phoenix and elsewhere highlight the fact that we need to to a better job of taking care of our veterans, and the attacks on education by the Republican Party clearly shows that their priorities are all wrong.

    Yes Guy, I agree. Looking at education, most of the "money" goes to "sports" . Also the "teachers" are not teaching useful "job" related interfaces; may be an ITT does but that is just about all. Neither an "attitude", "worldview" , "practice", "common sense", "job reality". It is here more or less ; as long as you can do the "written book" work and sports then you graduate. I compare it with a "drivers test"; if you can answer the questions; that does not mean you are a good driver.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    As we have discussed under the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement, America needs to put more emphasis on education. Period! The global economy is changing rapidly, and to compete in the 21st Century, we need to be highly innovative and educated. We need to spend more money on research. We need to value our teachers and pay them well. We need to start early with Pre-school for every child. We need free Community College and free regular college. We need job retraining programs with teeth. Demographic groups that are being left behind need help...minorities, the poor, those who have lost jobs. We need all of these things...but we just don't seem to have the will to make it happen.

    We criticize China and blame them for all of our problems, but hey, they are out educating us, out innovating us, and have learned to play the market place with the skill of a Harvard graduate (which they are). They are the world's leader now in solar energy and their fast trains make ours look like relics of the 50s...which they are. We marvel at our trains if they can get up to 100 mph. The Chinese trains travel at over 200 mph, and now they are looking to go ultra fast with their maglev train. If you have to ask what a maglev train is, well that's part of the problem.

    Watch this video as the Chinese build a 57 story skyscraper in just 19 days. It's not photo shopped. Can the American worker compete in the 21st Century? Not unless we have a change of attitudes about education.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    As we have discussed under the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement, America needs to put more emphasis on education. Period! The global economy is changing rapidly, and to compete in the 21st Century, we need to be highly innovative and educated. We need to spend more money on research. We need to value our teachers and pay them well. We need to start early with Pre-school for every child. We need free Community College and free regular college. We need job retraining programs with teeth. Demographic groups that are being left behind need help...minorities, the poor, those who have lost jobs. We need all of these things...but we just don't seem to have the will to make it happen.

    We criticize China and blame them for all of our problems, but hey, they are out educating us, out innovating us, and have learned to play the market place with the skill of a Harvard graduate (which they are). They are the world's leader now in solar energy and their fast trains make ours look like relics of the 50s...which they are. We marvel at our trains if they can get up to 100 mph. The Chinese trains travel at over 200 mph, and now they are looking to go ultra fast with their maglev train. If you have to ask what a maglev train is, well that's part of the problem.

    Watch this video as the Chinese build a 57 story skyscraper in just 19 days. It's not photo shopped. Can the American worker compete in the 21st Century? Not unless we have a change of attitudes about education.

    Schmidt, yes I agree, but you forget to mention, just education does not do it the way it is done here. It is the "content" of the education which has to be changed and adapted to a modern world; to teach the same curriculum over and over, that sets us behind other countries. For instance the "tie" between industry and "school" is a huge gap. Also "world" knowledge is on the last place; logistics and efficiency is not taught. Neither looking at a "big" picture. Most the training here is centered only on one subject, seldom cause and effect on other things. I found out in the aircraft industry, that seldom people had training on the total scope of buying, operating, maintaining, interface, engineering of aircraft. Here they are only trained with blinders on and concentrate only on the limited area what they know, but seldom explore something outside their cubicle.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Dutch -- You are right of course. Just look at how many young people are graduating from college, yet have no job prospects for their chosen disciplines. They end up in low paying service related jobs, not anywhere meeting their expectations. Even when people choose the "right career" based on what the market is at the time, they'll graduate finding that the market has changed during the Great Recession. In other words they went to school for the "wrong education".

    Certain profitable industries do in fact hire people for their overall aptitude and will train them to be specialists in their specific fields, and many of those specialties can only be learned "on the job" and not in the class room. Good people can be trained to do almost any job if the commitment is there...if they are "hungry". However, what you are describing is "broad based" people versus specialists. Many valued specialists I knew on the job were that because they spent an inordinate amount of their free time by choice making themselves into specialists. The mistake that some companies make is that they promote their successful specialists upward, but these people as you point out often lack the managerial and people skills to be successful.

    Much of the focus now seems to be steering people to scientific fields rather than liberal arts degrees. Yet liberal arts graduates do have a broader perspective on how society works in general, and we must not lose that knowledge and perspective by becoming too entrenched in only what makes us money.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote:

    Dutch -- You are right of course. Just look at how many young people are graduating from college, yet have no job prospects for their chosen disciplines. They end up in low paying service related jobs, not anywhere meeting their expectations. Even when people choose the "right career" based on what the market is at the time, they'll graduate finding that the market has changed during the Great Recession. In other words they went to school for the "wrong education".

    Certain profitable industries do in fact hire people for their overall aptitude and will train them to be specialists in their specific fields, and many of those specialties can only be learned "on the job" and not in the class room. Good people can be trained to do almost any job if the commitment is there...if they are "hungry". However, what you are describing is "broad based" people versus specialists. Many valued specialists I knew on the job were that because they spent an inordinate amount of their free time by choice making themselves into specialists. The mistake that some companies make is that they promote their successful specialists upward, but these people as you point out often lack the managerial and people skills to be successful.

    Much of the focus now seems to be steering people to scientific fields rather than liberal arts degrees. Yet liberal arts graduates do have a broader perspective on how society works in general, and we must not lose that knowledge and perspective by becoming too entrenched in only what makes us money.

    Schmidt, I must compliment you that you understand what is going on. Indeed people here get bogged down in the "daily" routine but refuse to look at the big picture also in their jobs. Luckily I had friends who came in the evening and taught me that there is more to the job I had; also the head of design commuted with me to work so we discussed the product and sorted out things while we drove. I started at the bottom but ended up at the top, just because I wanted to know the whole picture not just be a detail freak.. Just to add to your comments; Americans never built "precise/quality" products like Germany; there is an another area to focus on; ask GM.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    I am still bothered that the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) apparently hasn't been more effective in retraining workers. It has given cause to right wing organizations like the Heritage Foundation to call for defeating all TAA measures. I'm an advocate for the TAA but will be the first to admit that someone needs to take a close look at it to see how it can be strengthened...or maybe present the numbers more accurately. Otherwise it will be attacked again and again. I haven't had the time to delve into it, but a quick Google search will find right wing sites blasting it. I have some thoughts, but need to do more research.

    Trade Adjustment Assistance how it works