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Guns: who owns them, who does what with them, and what should be done about them)

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  • Independent
    Massachusetts
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    During the last few weeks I researched the Web and came up with quite a bit of information.
    Sandwiching the charts and lists between my own essays (most past posts hereon), I published GUNSGUNSGUNS, who has them, who does what with them, and what should be done with them . . . guns and those who have them . ISBN 5800109831896 (www.LULU.com, also thru Amazon).

    Were there no guns there'd be no gun crime or gun fatalities. In this country there's no possibility of getting rid of guns. What would happen is legitimate gun owners would be prosecuted and persecuted and criminals and lunatics would be the gun owners exclusive echelon.
    But no sooner than anyone should be allowed to just take off on a Harley or fly an airplane or broadcast on certain wavelengths . . should anyone be able to just legally buy a gun and walk off with it. There needs to be background survelllance, and probably even some mandated course in "gun ownership protocol and protection".
    And also there has to be restriction on just what kinds of guns can be privately owned.

    From what I found, the regions of the country where there are the most guns owned (and used -- hunting) have extremely low crime rates and gun fatalities. The crimes-to-guns correlation is a fallacy except within confined contexts such as inner cities and socioeconomically deprived demographics. And there, the guns are contraband, illegal, untraceable. Otherwise and other places, all kinds of guns even openly carried.

    The rabid extremists on both sides should educate themselves to what's actually involved in gun ownership, gun crime, and comparisons to other countries. In my brief compilation of information and inspirations, I've tried to present a sort of synopsis of where it's at and where the where of it's being at.
    From the cohesive info (far from comprehensive) I've written up, the reader should arrive at what I've concluded.
    Which I'll leave up to the reader.

    For the next few weekends I'll try to paste a portion of my researched info. as my thread. I'd hope that someone might be interested in my whole book.




    1st. segment: Compared to conveyance carnage, gunnings by firearms are of slight statistical significance.

    Where there are more automobiles there will be more automobile accidents and injuries and deaths.
    Where there are more sky divers there will be more deaths due to parachutes.
    Where there are more ice cliff climbers there will be more deaths due to slipping and sliding and this variation on the theme of plummeting from on high.
    Where there are more smokers there will be more emphesemaics and the cancerous.
    Where there are more of anythings there will be more "stuff happens" happenings.
    Except for automobiles, the above (and so many more) "stuffs of the disastrous happenings" have been, or at least could be somewhat controlled.
    Per 100,000 population per region (urban, rural, American, different foreign) what number of deaths due to lightning, electrocution, drowning, autos, bikes, bicycles, overdoses of prescriptions, gas explosions, CO2 poisoning, suicide, knifings, sexual exertion, medical error, . . . is the gun less dangerous than the Gyn? or more significantly the surgeon? . . . . boating mishaps sharks, spontaneous human combustion, snake bites, bat bites, dog bites, overbites, domestic violence with power tools, venomous pets, post traumatic stress disorder, postal workers, Monsanto Corporation, Monopoly game disputes, falling architectural elements, falling in general (on ice, in tubs, off whatever) . . . . . .



    According to the National Highway Traffic Administration, car accidents happen every minute of the day. Motor vehicle accidents occur in any part of the world every 60 seconds. And if it’s all summed up in a yearly basis, there are 5.25 million driving accidents that take place per year. Statistics show that each year,43,000 or more of the United States’ population die due to vehicular accidents and around 2.9 million people end up suffering light or severe injuries. In a certain five year period, there had been recorded a 25% of the driving population who encountered or were involved in car accidents. It is also affirmed that car accidents kill a child every 3 minutes. Statistics on the number of car accidents taking place in every state or country is normally based on medical or insurance records filed.
    Based on a research conducted years back, an estimated number of 1.2 million car accident deaths occurred last 2004 and 50 million people injured worldwide. In the Global Status Report on Road Safety 2009 made by the World Health Organization, more than 90% of the world’s road casualties happen in low and middle income countries which comprise only 48% of the world’s registered vehicles. The escalating death rates pertaining to driving accidents over the years have already become one of the most serious global issues. It is estimated that by 2020, road accident casualties will exceed HIV/AIDS mortality and disability rate.
    There were several legislative amendments and technical changes made such as brakes innovation to reduce fatal accident rates but the contributing factors to vehicular accidents especially driver impairment or behavior surmounted. The factors that contribute to roadway accidents are mostly preventable and only require reasonable care. In a study concerning car crashes, it shows that the ultimate contributing factor in vehicular accidents is driver impairment or error such as poor eyesight, phone distractions and drunk driving. Other road accident contributing factors are traffic violations, equipment or vehicle failure and road conditions.
    Driving accidents are also considered the ultimate cause of permanent disability of in most countries. These tragic accidents take the lives of thousands of people while millions of surviving vehicular accident victims suffers from injuries and permanent disabilities on the part of those who are severely hurt. The aftermath of vehicular accidents aside from bodily injuries or death is the financial damage which is suffered by the parties involved. The financial burden as a result of car damages and the loss of income or wage typically involves a great deal of money.It is the paramount interest of the state to protect the safety of its people and although numerous precautionary measures are taken to prevent or lessen car accident related deaths, this will always be a long term global concern if people will not constantly practice the discipline required to ensure safety.




    Vector Set - Weapons - Pistols, Sub Machine Guns, Assault Rifles, Sniper Rifles, LMGs, Knives, Grenades - stock vector
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    Those are stunning statistics, 43,000 killed every year wow, I would venture to say that the vast majority of those involved accidents where a fatality occurred were vehicles driven by licensed drivers, meaning that they passed a certain local governmental criteria to allow them to be able to operate their vehicle, also they for the most part travelled on roads that are regulated and maintained by the government, both state and federal, and again in most states there is a vehicle inspection requirement for safety and road worthiness , and yet 43,000 still die, I guess I can surmise that vehicles don't kill but people do. just as guns don't kill,people do. Mental health background issues should be resolved ,especially if even the NRA supports a mental health background check.
  • Independent
    Massachusetts
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    Continuing information regarding gun ownership and the results thereof -- begun last week.
    I take no responsibility for skewed lines of charts or other discrepancies. Also, the accuracy of internet information
    is subject to confirmation by others.

    UNODC murder rates for recent years
    Americas (No & So) rate per 100,000 16.3 count l57,000
    Africa 12.5 135,000
    World 6.2 437,000
    Europe 3.0 22,000
    Oceania 3.0 1,100
    Asia 2.9 122,000


    China and United Kingdom – public possession of fire arms banned
    Australia, Japan, Singapore – strict and difficult requirements
    Canada – must be registered and have training and personal risk
    assessment, criminal background check, and two references

    High income countries averaged 1.66 million crimes in 2002
    Eurozone average -- 980,998.22
    Emerging markets average – 743,210.43

    States
    As of 2012, 13 of the 14 "battleground states" - gun ownership 30% or more. All ten of them with highest gun ownership (50% or more) are Republican. Nine of the ten states with the lowest gun ownership (all less than 30%) are Dem., sole exception being Florida, a "battleground state" with 24.5 gun ownership.

    Honduras, far fewer guns but highest 68/100,000 gun murders.
    US - highest per capita gun ownership but gun homicides 3/100,000
    Variance of gun ownership by state



    crime % gun murder by college % white
    rate pop ownrs /100th gun grad
    Wash. DC 13.9 604,723 3.6 21.8 16.5 65.6 38.5
    Louisiana 10.8 4,533,572 44.1 9.6 7.7 20.5 62.6
    New Mexico 6,6 2,059,179 34.8 5.7 3.3 24.8 68.4
    Maryland 6.3 5,773,552 21.3 7.3 5.1 35.2 58.2
    Tennessee 6.0 6.346,105 43.9 5.6 3.5 21.8 77.6
    Alabama 7.1 4,779,736 51.7 4.2 2.8 21.4 68.5
    Mississippi 7.4 2,967,297 55.3 5.6 4.0 18.9 59.1
    Missouri 6.5 5,988,927 41.7 7.0 6.4 24.5 82.8
    Michigan 7.0 9.993,640 38.4 5.6 4.2 24.7 78.9
    S Carolina 6.9 4,625,364 42.3 6.1 4.5 23.5 66.2
    Arkansas 5.9 2,915,918 55.3 4.5 3.2 19.3 77
    Oklahoma 5.7 3,751,351 42.9 5.0 3.0 22.6 72.2
    Illinois 5.8 12,830,632 20.2 3.5 2.8 29.5 71.3
    Nevada 4.5 2,700,551 33.8 6.9 3.1 21.8 66.2

    Georgia 5.9 9,920,000 40.3 5.3 3.8 27.1 59.7
    Florida 5.2 19,687,653 24.5 5.0 3.9 25.8 75
    Arizona 5.5 6,392,017 31.1 5.5 3.6 26.0 73
    Texas 4.4 25.145.561 35.9 5.0 3.2 25.2 70.4
    California 5.0 37,253,956 21.3 4.9 3.4 29.5 57.6
    N Carolina 4.9 9,535,483 41.3 4.7 3.0 25.6 68.5
    Pennsylvania 5.4 12,702,279 34.7 5.1 3.6 25.8 81.9
    Indiana 4.7 6,483,802 39.1 3.1 2.2 22.1 84.3
    Delaware 6.2 893,934 25.5 5.3 6.2 26.1 68.9
    W Virginia 3.9 6,724,540 33.1 2.2 1.4 17.3 93.9
    Ohio 4.3 11,536,504 32.4 4.0 2.7 24.1 82.7
    Virginia 3.8 8,001,024 35.1 4.6 3.1 33.6 68.6
    Kansas 2.9 2,853,118 42.1 3.5 2.2 28.8 83.8
    Kentucky 4.5 4,339,367 47.7 4.6 2.7 20.0 87.8
    New York 3.5 19,378,102 l8.0 4.4 2.7 31.7 65.7
    New Jersey 4.4 8,791,894 12.3 4,1 2,7 33.9 68.6
    Colorado 3.1 5,029,196 34.7 2.3 1.3 35.0 81.3
    Alaska 4.1 710,231 57.8 4.4 2.7 21.4 66.7
    Connecticut 4.1 3,574,097 16.7 3.7 2.7 34.7 77.8
    Montana 2.7 989,415 57.7 2.1 1.2 27.0 89.4
    Rhode Isl. 3.2 1,052,567 12.8 2.8 1.5 29.8 81.4
    Washington 3.0 6,724,540 33.1 2.2 1.4 30.3 77.3
    Massachusetts1.8 6,547,629 12.6 3,2 1,8 37.9 80.4
    So. Dakota 3.0 814,180 56.6 1.7 1.0 25.0 85.9
    Wisconsin 3.0 5,686,986 44.4 2.7 1.7 25.4 86.2
    Wyoming 2.4 536,626 59.7 1.4 .9 23.4 35.4
    Nebraska 2.9 1,826,341 38.6 2.8 1.8 27.5 86.1
    Oregon 2.4 3,831,074 39.8 2.0 .9 28.3 83.6
    Maine 1.9 2,328,361 40.5 1.8 .8 26.7 95.2
    Hawaii 2.1 ????????????????????????????????????????????????????
    No Dakota 4.0 672,591 50.7 1.3 .6 25.7 90
    Idaho 1.6 1,567,582 55.3 1.3 .8 24.5 89.1
    Minnesota 1.8 5,303,925 41.7 1.7 1.0 31.0 85.3
    Utah 1.8 2,763,885 43.9 1.9 .8 28.7 86.1
    Iowa 1.6 3,036,355 42.9 1.2 .7 24.3 91.3
    Vermont 1.3 625,741 42.0 1.1 .3 33.6 99.3
    New Hamp 1.1 1,316,470 30.0 1.0 ,4 32.5 93.9
    Wyoming 2.4 563,626 59.7 1.4 .9 23.4 90.7
    Montana 2.9 989,415 57.7 2.1 1.2 27.0 89.4


    “The pattern is staggering. A number of U. S. cities have gun homicide rates in line with the most deadly nations in the world.
    If a country: New Orleans (rate of 62.1 gun murders per 100,000) would rank second in the world.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    My thoughts are that these cites have high rates of poverty which is closely related to crime and drug use and poor performing schools which also adds to the already high unemployment rate ,particularly among the younger group ,I would guess and say between 15 to 19 years of age. I would also venture a guess and say that the vast majority of those killed by guns were of the handgun variety and that they were not registered as lawful owners. Therein lies the problem, not more Laws or tougher registration requirements. Solve these issue and the homicide rate will come down.
  • Independent
    Massachusetts
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    The extrapolation of information I'd wanted to post regarding guns and who owns them and what should be done about them (the guns and those that own them) . . . . . .just isn't going to work by pasting to this forum. And I'm not ambitious enough to re-type (rather than copy/paste) charts of stats re. socioeconomic levels and gun ownership -- regional ownership and crime rates -- education level and gun ownership -- and other interesting non-correlations of gun possession and gun crime.
    Where there are more guns there are perhaps prevalently less gun crimes (other than if you're a deer or varmint making the judgment) than where there are overall less. The exception, of course, is inner cities where the problem is guns in the possession of violent or desperate people.
    The incidences of gun massacres (schools, theater, snipers) are statistically insignificant other than for the tragedy of innocents, especially children, as the victims. But the attribution of the device (gun) to a pervasive problem is somewhat comparable to the reaction to commercial airline crashes as a criterion of the danger of flying.
    The probability of being killed in an airline crash is less than by perhaps thousands of other unfortunate occurrances such as falls and alcohol overdoses and excess speeding on skateboards and . . . . . on and on. The same statistical correlations apply regarding the threat of guns per se.
    But, again, I maintain that for anyone to resist requirements to purchase and own and operate a weapon including background checks and training programs, is short-sighted at least. And at least special licensing should be required for those who would be allowed to have assault weapons -- similar to special training and licensing required if one wants to drive a tractor-trailer rather than a sedan.
    If anyone is interested in the presentation I refer to above (that I can't just present here in segments), the title is GUNSGUNSGUNS Guns, who has them,
    who does what with them, what should be done with them . . . guns and those who have them? Available on www.LULU.com and also Amazon.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    Other than certified Gun Collectors and licensed dealers, no private citizen may purchase an assault weapon.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    Gun deaths to car deaths is not being properly compared, and the numbers are grossly skewed because of this. Think about it in terms of hours being operated. Tens of millions of cars are being operated in the US every minute of every day. Hundreds of millions of man hours are dedicated to car use nationwide every day. The average American citizen will spend nearly 40,000 hours of his/her life inside of a car. Now, for some bad math, if 25% of people have been in a car accident, that would be 1 car accident for every 160,000 hours of driving. But I imagine that a lot of people have been in multiple car accidents, so let's err on the side of guns and say that 1 car accident for everyone 100,000 man-hours of driving. In 2013, there were roughly 5.4 million reported car accidents in the U.S. Just over 30,000 had a fatality, and 32,719 died from the crashes.

    That equals out to .006 deaths per man hour operating a car.
    Or it equals out to 1.1 death for every 100 MILLION miles driven according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

    Now, while I can't find specific data on how often people use guns, I can be fairly certain that, on average, Americans don't use guns nearly as often as they drive cars... not even close. I'm a gun owner. I come from a family of gun owners and gun enthusiasts. I have friends who make weekly trips to the firing range, and I know for certain that they use their car FAR more often than their gun. Then when you factor in people who don't even own guns, it will pull that average way down. In any case, I would argue that total number of man-hours dedicated to using a firearm is SIGNIFICANTLY less than those dedicated to driving.

    So, in America we had more deaths by gun than we had by car accidents total. Which means, if you compare deaths per man hour of use, guns would be insanely high when compared to cars. This is not a good comparison if you are speaking on behalf of gun rights.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Gun deaths figures are skewed all the way; here the head of police counts it as it suits him, so at the end of the year he can proudly promote himself that the number is less this year, because of the fantastic job he's doing. a lot of homicides are not counted. Every week even every three days there is a killing here; but on the end of the year they claim only 10 were killed. For instance if the person dies because of it in the hospital or later it is not counted, etc.
    No the authorities love to fool the public and make money doing so.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    Or, if you turn 1.1 fatalities per 100 million miles driven into deaths per hour driving, figuring the average national speed at 55 mph. You get...
    0.0000006 deaths per man hour driven. FAR less than my pro gun estimate.

    Or if you want a more pro gun estimate. Calculate using a 65mph speed limit...
    0.0000007 deaths per man hour.

    Which is still EXTREMELY bad for the pro gun analogy.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    Is there a Stat representing the amount of legally owned and registered weapons (hand guns) that were used in the commission of murder as opposed to unlicensed handgun's, I bet those stats you used would be changed dramaticly . And I would go further and say the stats are skewed some what by lumping urban murders with both suburban and rural murders. The urban crime rate as a whole, as well as murder, is far and away greater in those areas rather than the other locales .So my point is depending on the agenda of those seeking stats for their own personal agenda, the stats will be skewed.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    johnnycee Wrote: Is there a Stat representing the amount of legally owned and registered weapons (hand guns) that were used in the commission of murder as opposed to unlicensed handgun's, I bet those stats you used would be changed dramaticly . And I would go further and say the stats are skewed some what by lumping urban murders with both suburban and rural murders. The urban crime rate as a whole, as well as murder, is far and away greater in those areas rather than the other locales .So my point is depending on the agenda of those seeking stats for their own personal agenda, the stats will be skewed.
    I imagine there is but how would any of those stats fix the car death analogy or make case for guns any stronger?
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Zach F Wrote:
    johnnycee Wrote: Is there a Stat representing the amount of legally owned and registered weapons (hand guns) that were used in the commission of murder as opposed to unlicensed handgun's, I bet those stats you used would be changed dramaticly . And I would go further and say the stats are skewed some what by lumping urban murders with both suburban and rural murders. The urban crime rate as a whole, as well as murder, is far and away greater in those areas rather than the other locales .So my point is depending on the agenda of those seeking stats for their own personal agenda, the stats will be skewed.
    I imagine there is but how would any of those stats fix the car death analogy or make case for guns any stronger?
    This discussion does not make much sense; looking at cars, everyone uses and needs them day and night and is not purposely built to kill; not everyone has a gun; which purpose is only to kill or hurt, which you do not need for your daily life; so to compare such is kind of silly
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    The comparative analogy between cars and guns is that they are both licensed and regulated by the government, so stricter regulation is not the answer, Chicago leads the nation in homicide and yet they have some the toughest gun laws in the Nation, so again ,it's not more laws that are needed, what is needed is a truer sense of enforcement for the existing gun laws, where they appear weak or ineffective, change them.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    johnnycee Wrote: The comparative analogy between cars and guns is that they are both licensed and regulated by the government, so stricter regulation is not the answer, Chicago leads the nation in homicide and yet they have some the toughest gun laws in the Nation, so again ,it's not more laws that are needed, what is needed is a truer sense of enforcement for the existing gun laws, where they appear weak or ineffective, change them.
    The comparison is terrible because the danger of the two aren't even remotely close. It's like comparing death from sharks and deaths from a cow. The world will have about 5 deaths by sharks this year while there will be about 27 human fatalities by cow. Cows are 5 times deadlier than sharks you are just comparing two statistics that aren't really comparable. There vast difference of human exposure to the two animals make it impossible to do draw any reasonable conclusions from those cherry picked stats.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Zach F Wrote:
    johnnycee Wrote: The comparative analogy between cars and guns is that they are both licensed and regulated by the government, so stricter regulation is not the answer, Chicago leads the nation in homicide and yet they have some the toughest gun laws in the Nation, so again ,it's not more laws that are needed, what is needed is a truer sense of enforcement for the existing gun laws, where they appear weak or ineffective, change them.
    The comparison is terrible because the danger of the two aren't even remotely close. It's like comparing death from sharks and deaths from a cow. The world will have about 5 deaths by sharks this year while there will be about 27 human fatalities by cow. Cows are 5 times deadlier than sharks you are just comparing two statistics that aren't really comparable. There vast difference of human exposure to the two animals make it impossible to do draw any reasonable conclusions from those cherry picked stats.
    Yes, Zach, that is also my way of looking at it; compare it to how many camel accidents to being killed by mosquito's. Must be fun; this country is champion in statistics, but to tackle the actual problems is impossible because all the money went to making these statistics. WOW. (Just kidding)