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150 Feared Dead After Germanwings Flight Crashes in French Alps

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  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    A Germanwings airplane carrying 150 people crashed in the French Alps this morning, likely killing all on board. The flight was en route to Dusseldorf, Germany, but lost contact roughly forty minutes into the flight.

    Officials have said they are nearly certain that no one would survive a crash like this and don't expect to find any survivors. The flight records show that 45 Spanish and 67 German nationals, including 16 German students returning from an exchange trip to Spain were on board.

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel spoke about the tragedy shortly after it was reported and said that she will be visiting the crash site tomorrow. You can watch her full statement below:

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    jaredsxtn Wrote: A Germanwings airplane carrying 150 people crashed in the French Alps this morning, likely killing all on board. The flight was en route to Dusseldorf, Germany, but lost contact roughly forty minutes into the flight.

    Officials have said they are nearly certain that no one would survive a crash like this and don't expect to find any survivors. The flight records show that 45 Spanish and 67 German nationals, including 16 German students returning from an exchange trip to Spain were on board.

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel spoke about the tragedy shortly after it was reported and said that she will be visiting the crash site tomorrow. You can watch her full statement below:

    The plane was 24 years old; however is not neccessarely the cause of the crash; what strikes me is the simularities with Air Asia A320; both at above 30,000 ft and then going down like crazy. In the meantime I've not heard anything about that investigation lately; but it could be either a "fatique" failure or computer anomaly; I can't think of anything else. This plane was at 38,000 ft and a long way from Dusseldorf; so there was no reason to loose altitude yet above the French Alps, unless traffic control was involved.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    In reading the Daily Mail, one popular theory is that the windshield cracked incapacitating the pilots.

    Daily Mail, Did Germanwings plane windscreen CRACK?

    The article also shows photos of the badly damaged voice recorder.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote: In reading the Daily Mail, one popular theory is that the windshield cracked incapacitating the pilots.

    Daily Mail, Did Germanwings plane windscreen CRACK?

    The article also shows photos of the badly damaged voice recorder.
    Yes a very detailed report; if indeed it was a "mechanical" failure,it will be extreemly hard to prove, since the pieces are so small and impacted by the crash.
    I don't neccessarely believe in the windshield theory; I witnessed tests etc; it will stay together and does not desintregrate. My thoughts are either "fatigue" somewhere in any of the aerodynamic parts; once that happens no computers are going to help you. In our plant we cycled a wing day and night at the tip at least 10 ft up and down. However we had a wing break of on a plane in service, because of negative and other forces on it; so not all tests copy reality in flight.
    Aircraft fuselages are tested way beyond the life cycle, so I doubt if a decompression at 38,000 ft was the cause unless there was a fatique prone area in the airframe or a hatch or so was not locked properly; it remains a guessing game right now; so we'll wait and see if any evidence can be found. Anyway if the airframe and aerodynamic parts were intact during the decent then the flight computers would automatically level the plane at 15.000 ft, which did not happen which proves something wrong in the flight controls. (elevator?)
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    With the NYT report that the pilot was locked out of the cockpit by the other pilot, it explains a lot of things but also raises new questions. It sounds like it could be more sinister. This will drag on. Speculation will continue.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Schmidt Wrote: With the NYT report that the pilot was locked out of the cockpit by the other pilot, it explains a lot of things but also raises new questions. It sounds like it could be more sinister. This will drag on. Speculation will continue.
    Yes I saw the same thing on the news; I guess you can blame 9/11 for that; before that time cockpit doors were not locked. Thus in fact we were to blame. Wow.
    Anyway if the co-pilot wanted to commit suicide, why take 150 people with you? In my time you had mandatory check-ups at the company doctor and was checked out if you were fit to fly. So I wonder in this case, if someone is so depressed then the early signs should have shown up at any such visit. Weird indeed. Also I don't understand the cockpit doorlock; a pilot should be able to enter either by swiping his badge or enter the "code"; if this door locked with an actual lock on the inside of the cockpit, than the airline made a huge mistake if it could not be unlocked from the passenger side. But anyway thanks again mr.Bush and predesessors for foreign policies which "invited" 9/11. (cause and effect)
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    With this co-pilot's actions if proven true, brings to mind those other Airplanes that went down in the South Pacific and what was the reason /reasons for it occur,and also given the fact that the planes were so off course, was it to avoid rescue of the downed aircraft or to be able to prevent a suicide by the pilot or co-pilot?
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Yes Dutch, I am all for making it GWB's fault. This will likely cause a major "Rules" change. Other pilots on the news last night said that in the US if one of the two pilots leave the cockpit they must have a flight attendant take their place until they return. This is in case the other pilot has a heart attack or some other extreme medical condition where they lose control. Thus leaving another who can open the door. I expect this will become a new international standard after this incident.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    TJ Wrote: Yes Dutch, I am all for making it GWB's fault. This will likely cause a major "Rules" change. Other pilots on the news last night said that in the US if one of the two pilots leave the cockpit they must have a flight attendant take their place until they return. This is in case the other pilot has a heart attack or some other extreme medical condition where they lose control. Thus leaving another who can open the door. I expect this will become a new international standard after this incident.
    Tony this is correct; it has been the policy of KLM and their partners for years; howver Lufthansa and its partners may have not adapted that rule. Anyway I still can not understand that an un-experienced pilot with only 600 flighthours is left alone in the cockpit. The A320 with its sidestick is not too easy to fly; I tried it on the simulator and made an approach but the stick is extreemly sensitive so you over correct quickly.
  • Liberal
    Independent
    Durham, NH
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    I wouldn't be too thrilled to know a 28 year old co-pilot was in charge of a plane I was flying in!
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    It is time they install miniature camera's in the cockpit; just having voice does not cut it anymore. This recording can then be stored in a crashproof box and erased upon successful arrival of plane. It is a bit antique just to have a data and voice box only in our present environment. I already contacted GoPro if they are interested to develop such. Pilot unions may object but this is needed.
  • Independent
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    There is one very easy, inexpensive, way to prevent this tragedy. Civilian pilots like myself, and military pilots, never leave their seats to go pee. Instead we use something called a "relief tube." This is basically an external catheter attached to a tube leading down to a container. Peeing is easy while we are seated. Once relieved we carry on flying. Simple and inexpensive fix.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    Lionpilot Wrote: There is one very easy, inexpensive, way to prevent this tragedy. Civilian pilots like myself, and military pilots, never leave their seats to go pee. Instead we use something called a "relief tube." This is basically an external catheter attached to a tube leading down to a container. Peeing is easy while we are seated. Once relieved we carry on flying. Simple and inexpensive fix.
    I was under the assumption that this was the norm until this weeks tragedy. I agree that it seems like a very simple and inexpensive fix for all.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    What about the matter of defecation, perhaps this pilot had this reason to leave the cockpit. I don't see any immediate solution to this problem, if someone wants to commit suicide there really is no viable preventitive measure to take against it.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Lionpilot Wrote: There is one very easy, inexpensive, way to prevent this tragedy. Civilian pilots like myself, and military pilots, never leave their seats to go pee. Instead we use something called a "relief tube." This is basically an external catheter attached to a tube leading down to a container. Peeing is easy while we are seated. Once relieved we carry on flying. Simple and inexpensive fix.
    Sure; I knew it existed for military pilots; have not seen it in civil aviation. Military planes often lack toilets that is the reason. I doubt if airlines adapt this; the unions will be against this. Also if you've had a long flight you want to stretch your legs etc. There are all kinds of reasons to leave the cockpit; especially on "cruise" mode; the plane flies itself. Nutheads is the problem; better screening and medical reporting should be strict and old fashioned discipline should apply; it is not a school bus!!! During my tenure, there was also a period where the rules in the aviation industry kind of slackened; the result was several crashes; also due to faked maintenance records; this is happening again. People nowadays have a kind of "who cares" atttude; I get away with it, etc.