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President Obama's VICE Interview (Watch Here)

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    johnnycee Wrote: I think that any State or Federal subsidies or better yet Grants for the students should be paid directly to the student , perhaps that might put a dent in the Student loan industry and perhaps lower some of the tuition cost increases.
    It already works that way. Grants to low-income students are taken off the cost of tuition at the top.

    I'll break down an example of how much a typical year at Temple will cost an average first year student. I'm using Temple University as an example because all the other ones you listed are private universities and aren't nearly as dependent on the State and Federal Government for funds.

    2015-2016 Year (In-State Tuition) (Liberal Arts Degree)

    Tuition (Full-time Student): $14,006.00
    Fees: $690
    Housing: $10,000 (average)
    Meal Plans: $3,680 (unlimited)
    Books: ($1,000-$2,500/semester)

    Total: $30,876 (give or take per year)

    Current Grants and Loan's Available
    (Grants are only available for students who meet the financial need set forth by either the Federal Government or State Government of Pennsylvania.)

    Federal Pell Grant: $5,775 (note--this is the maximum a student can receive. They have to be at the very bottom of the income ladder in order to receive the full grant)

    PHEAA State Grant: (?? I can't find any specific number, but it was $3,500 in Illinois when I worked as a college admissions counselor, so I'll just base it off of that.)

    Subsidized Stafford Loan: $3,500
    Unsubsidized Stafford Loan: $2,000

    $30,876-$9,275 (Grants) = $21,601 (remaining balance before loans)

    $21,601- $5,500 = $16,101 (remaining balance after loans)

    So an average student who qualifies for ALL grants and takes out the maximum amount of federal loans still owes $16,101 on top of the student loans they took out to attend a state university whose parents have been paying taxes to keep operational their entire lives.

    Now, there are additional grants, scholarships, and loans that a student and their parents can apply for, but those are not even remotely guaranteed. Many of the loans are dependent on a parents credit history and receiving a scholarship is an extremely tedious and frustrating process for a student. I can't tell you how many stories I have from my time as an admissions counselor where a student applied for over one hundred scholarships only to receive one or two thousand dollars total. Scholarships both at the state and federal level are extremely competitive and not necessarily the best way to help a student fund their schooling.

    So we are basically pricing the lower and middle classes out of receiving a higher education, thereby guaranteeing a permanent lower close in America. It is imperative for us to fix this mess before it gets too late.
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    jaredsxtn Wrote:
    johnnycee Wrote: I think that any State or Federal subsidies or better yet Grants for the students should be paid directly to the student , perhaps that might put a dent in the Student loan industry and perhaps lower some of the tuition cost increases.
    It already works that way. Grants to low-income students are taken off the cost of tuition at the top.

    I'll break down an example of how much a typical year at Temple will cost an average first year student. I'm using Temple University as an example because all the other ones you listed are private universities and aren't nearly as dependent on the State and Federal Government for funds.

    2015-2016 Year (In-State Tuition) (Liberal Arts Degree)

    Tuition (Full-time Student): $14,006.00
    Fees: $690
    Housing: $10,000 (average)
    Meal Plans: $3,680 (unlimited)
    Books: ($1,000-$2,500/semester)

    Total: $33,376 (give or take per year)

    Current Grants and Loan's Available
    (Grants are only available for students who meet the financial need set forth by either the Federal Government or State Government of Pennsylvania.)

    Federal Pell Grant: $5,775 (note--this is the maximum a student can receive. They have to be at the very bottom of the income ladder in order to receive the full grant)

    PHEAA State Grant: (?? I can't find any specific number, but it was $3,500 in Illinois when I worked as a college admissions counselor, so I'll just base it off of that.)

    Subsidized Stafford Loan: $3,500
    Unsubsidized Stafford Loan: $2,000

    $33,376-$9,275 (Grants) = $24,101 (remaining balance before loans)

    $24,101- $5,500 = $18,601 (remaining balance after loans)

    So an average student who qualifies for ALL grants and takes out the maximum amount of federal loans still owes $18,601 on top of the student loans they took out to attend a state university whose parents have been paying taxes to keep operational their entire lives.

    Now, there are additional grants, scholarships, and loans that a student and their parents can apply for, but those are not even remotely guaranteed. Many of the loans are dependent on a parents credit history and receiving a scholarship is an extremely tedious and frustrating process for a student. I can't tell you how many stories I have from my time as an admissions counselor where a student applied for over one hundred scholarships only to receive one or two thousand dollars total. Scholarships both at the state and federal level are extremely competitive and not necessarily the best way to help a student fund their schooling.

    So we are basically pricing the lower and middle classes out of receiving a higher education, thereby guaranteeing a permanent lower close in America. It is imperative for us to fix this mess before it gets too late.
    So how is it that the average student upon graduating is neck deep in debt or so I am told by various media stories, unless the $18,000 still owed is only for one semester, so for the full degreed program do I multiply that by 4, also is there any way that the Collages can help in this financial mess we find ourselves in regarding student loans.
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    johnnycee Wrote: So how is it that the average student upon graduating is neck deep in debt or so I am told by various media stories, unless the $18,000 still owed is only for one semester, so for the full degreed program do I multiply that by 4, also is there any way that the Collages can help in this financial mess we find ourselves in regarding student loans.
    Times that number by four and then add some more because tuition goes up each year.

    I don't blame college for this mess we find ourselves in; I blame the states and the Federal government for not thinking about the long term. They listen to too many people like Grover Norquist and other far right people who want to slash taxes at all costs. What happens when we do that is we start divesting in higher education and passing a cost that used to be largely covered by the taxpayers (plural) to a taxpayer (single). I blame this anti-government, anti-higher education rhetoric on Reagan who planted this seed in Americans minds that trickle down economics is the only way to govern. Before Reagan came around people actually cared about funding our colleges and universities and had a long term education strategy. That went out the window during his reign and we have never recovered.
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    My sons will have to deal with this situation as my grandchildren get older, even now my one granddaughter is in the running for a scholarship to a high school, based on her academics and her swimming abilities, I wish her well, high school tuition in my area is around $ 10.000 or more , depending on the school itself, but then again these are private schools (catholic), but to get into a collage of her choice via the scholarship route, and based on her swimming accomplishments , she needs to attend a high school with a good accomplished swim team to be even considered,other wise it's a wait and see type of thing.