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Disrupting Cancer

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  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Sanjay Gupta reporting for 60 Minutes

    I just watched an episode of 60 Minutes that I recorded about a month ago. The topic was cancer. Over 1500 people die every day in this country from cancer.
    All anyone in a bad situation can want is hope. It sounds like things might be improving. They said more has been learned (about cancer) in the last 5 years
    than ever before. I thought it was refreshing to get any good news at all on such a negative topic. The above link covers the story in just under 14 minutes.
    I would hope that many take a moment to get some new information.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    Cancer is such a terrible disease and one that affects nearly every single person at least one time in their lives. Be it themselves, a family member, or friend, everyone knows someone who has or used to have cancer.

    I just wish our Government and the American people in general cared about this as much as we do ebola and ISIS.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    You are right. It comes into almost every life either directly or indirectly. Watch the 60 minutes video. 14 minutes.
    It gives reasons to be hopeful going forward. Technology and medicine are combined in a vital way. Even those
    who aren't killed by cancer are often bankrupted by it.

    Thank you to jared who advised me the correct/new way to post a you tube video.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    Yes, I've had victims all around me; I wished indeed that this government would spent the money of the F35 on that instead, because cancer is the biggest enemy here in the western world, not terrorists.
  • Independent
    Foxborough, MA
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    Thanks for the link and video. It is interesting and one of many new possibles for treating cancer in the future. The bigger issue as I see it is not treating it, but finding out why it occurs and preventing it. So much of our environment is full of toxic material and that is where focus needs to be addressed. The other issue is that of early detection. There are so many screening tests, which provide false positives, or cost a fortune if insurance does not cover them, that many people do not receive diganoses until the cancer is far advanced and has done its damage. Treatment can be worse than the disease. Barbaric in some cases.

    Unfortunately there is no band-aid for this deadly disease. Maybe in time these new technologies will allow treatment to bring long remissions (they mentioned "chronic") but this is so much deeper an issue. The first step is trying to find out why it occurs and work on making our environment less toxic. This is an issue which has evaded researchers for decades.

    Before you question my reasons for what I write, I am an almost 20 year survivor of an advanced gynecological cancer, and lost one daughter and my husband to lung cancer, as well as many friends to various cancers. I know cancer, unfortunately.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    Dutch Wrote: Yes, I've had victims all around me; I wished indeed that this government would spent the money of the F35 on that instead, because cancer is the biggest enemy here in the western world, not terrorists.
    I couldn't agree more, but would venture to say that heart disease is the biggest threat. That kills more Americans a year than cancer does. Cancer comes in at number two.

    Chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, accidents, Alzheimer's, diabetes, influenza, Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis, and suicide cap off the top ten.

    You know what doesn't kill many Americans? Terrorism.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    jaredsxtn Wrote:
    Dutch Wrote: Yes, I've had victims all around me; I wished indeed that this government would spent the money of the F35 on that instead, because cancer is the biggest enemy here in the western world, not terrorists.
    I couldn't agree more, but would venture to say that heart disease is the biggest threat. That kills more Americans a year than cancer does. Cancer comes in at number two.

    Chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, accidents, Alzheimer's, diabetes, influenza, Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis, and suicide cap off the top ten.

    You know what doesn't kill many Americans? Terrorism.
    Jared; however cancer is the most painfull and drags on; I had a heart condition but I guess cancer is more suffering than that.
  • Democrat
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    Hi, Newbie here
    I am hoping having everyone insured will get more people to the doctor earlier - My sister used to laugh at me that I went to the doctor too often, usually once a year for a check up and blood work and then if I break something or have a sinus infect or special stuff like that. That stopped a few years ago - about 5 years ago my cousin came down with uterine cancer - she put off seeing the doctor because she was "busy". When they found it , it was stage 3, she was dead a few weeks later. The next year, I started bleeding, i went to the doctor right away, the bleeding was actually caused by a viral infection no one can tell me how I got, but I also had stage 1 cancer - a quick operation and it was done for, the doctor said it was so early I did not need radiation or chemo - after 2 visits, the doctor said that I was healing so fast, I only had to see the doctor every 6 months instead of 3 months - so my uterine cancer was no biggie. I really do feel if most people see the doctor earlier, that fewer will die or need more serious intervention - kind of like if you see the dentist you will have yoru teeth longer. ,. - ditto with heart problems. take care of it early and it will not be as big a problem.
  • Independent
    Foxborough, MA
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    hollysmom Wrote: Hi, Newbie here
    I am hoping having everyone insured will get more people to the doctor earlier - (SNIP) When they found it , it was stage 3, she was dead a few weeks later. (SNIP) I also had stage 1 cancer - a quick operation and it was done for, I really do feel if most people see the doctor earlier, that fewer will die or need more serious intervention - kind of like if you see the dentist you will have yoru teeth longer. ,. - ditto with heart problems. take care of it early and it will not be as big a problem.
    HI newbie hollysmom,
    Welcome from another newbie (who also is a survivor of almost 20 years of stage 3C uterine cancer). Awareness is great, but survivors sharing experience is even better. In any situation. We all are here to learn from one another.......
    I joined the forum to learn more about our world, issues we face, and broaden my involvement. I do not say too much, but I do read everything Happy

    Click my avatar and you can learn more about me in my profile, Perhaps we can be "friends"
    ....meanwhile read, contribute when you can, ask questions.....
    I am concerned about the issues we face in conserving the world for our children, grandchildren, and on and on. Lots of varied content here to provide food or thought and to chew on.
    Again, welcome.....
  • Democrat
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    hi, Sky,
    I hope you did not read what I said as disparaging to you or anyone else who gets late stage cancer. You obviously know way more than I do about it. I was lucky as I had a symptom from a virus and in looking for what caused that they found the cancer. But my cousin had symptoms she ignored because someone in her family always needed her. She really never considered herself first. I swear I would yell at her all the time to see a doctor, but family came first for her
    I also see you were a CPA - so was my sister, heh, ran her own company for decades. Me, I was a techie. but basically we were both in male dominated careers. If and when I do write a blog abut my financial cure for the country,I will ask you to evaluate it first.
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    I watched the interview with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on MSNBC this evening. She talked about her health and that she's doing fine at age 81 (she'll be 82 in March). I can't remember all the cancer issues in her life so I copied them here out of Wikipedia.

    "Ginsburg was diagnosed with colon cancer in 1999 and underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation therapy. During the process, she did not miss a day on the bench. On February 5, 2009, she again underwent surgery related to pancreatic cancer. Ginsburg's tumor was discovered at an early stage. She was released from a New York City hospital, eight days after the surgery and heard oral arguments again four days later.

    On September 24, 2009, Ginsburg was hospitalized in Washington DC for lightheadedness following an outpatient treatment for iron deficiency and was released the following day.

    On November 26, 2014, she had a stent placed in her right coronary artery after experiencing discomfort while exercising in the Supreme Court gym with her personal trainer."


    As a Supreme Court justice, she obviously has access to good health care, but the fact that she has been cancer free for so long is testament to the the effectiveness of modern medicine and treatments.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Wow Schmidt, That's amazing. Pancreatic cancer is almost always a quick death. When you're rich......... you get a much better lawyer and perhaps when you're rich you get a much better doctor.
    From the 60 minutes story, I certainly hope they are getting better at fighting it. When facing a bad situation....... Hope is a good thing to have on your side.
  • Independent
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    Part of the problem is that there is some remarkable technology already available--it just isn't broadly accessible. Most hospitals and physicians don't employ the latest and greatest, and limited insurance networks keep most people from going to the places that do have the best.

    I have to agree, though, that screening (and more improved advanced detection technology) would go a long way to keeping more people from being touched by cancer.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    My wife's cancer was found thru early detection methods and she received the care that led her to become a survivor, mine also was detected thru a routine examination and now I am going thru medical treatments that will allow me to become a survivor also, hopefully. Early detection is the key!!
  • Liberal
    Independent
    Durham, NH
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    I was diagnosed with Prostate cancer about 8 years ago. I chose the radiation path and, for what it's worth, my PSA is down to .03 now from 4.5. My dad went thru years of very painful shots in his 60's and 70's and lived to within a few weeks of his 100 birthday! Of course, he lived in FL and, as I'm sure as Dutch will agree, FL doctors are well known to prey on the elderly!