Forum Thread

Legitimate Wrongdoing?

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  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Interesting use of the words "legitimate wrongdoing".
    Rachel Maddow is generally very precise; the use of the words above surprise me.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    Maddow listener Wrote: Interesting use of the words "legitimate wrongdoing".
    Rachel Maddow is generally very precise; the use of the words above surprise me.
    I would love to hear the exact definition of that point , not an opinion mind you, or what it should ,might, or could mean, but the definition and if possible the genus of it. Sounds way too much like the use of "Double Speak" from the novel :1984;.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Google it ?
    My daughter has had a Chinchilla for about 12 years. Very active animal with very sharp teeth. In my yard, squirrels eat walnuts all of the time. I wondered if her rodent could eat walnuts in the shell..... I Googled the entire question and I got a ton of web sites that let me know it would be too much fat for them.
    Google. . . . . . . . . What is legitimate wrongdoing
    and see what the replies are.

  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    I like that word; the "rulers" here do that all the time, even in court; Goverments and large companies can do things which are completely legal but still ruin your life. I approve of that word.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    legitimate, means legal, morally correct, wrongdoing means not legal, not morally correct, how are the two thoughts compatible? From a legal standpoint it seems they are not, but on a emotional level I guess you could rationalize it.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    johnnycee Wrote: legitimate, means legal, morally correct, wrongdoing means not legal, not morally correct, how are the two thoughts compatible? From a legal standpoint it seems they are not, but on a emotional level I guess you could rationalize it.
    J.C. "legal" is not always morally correct; "legal" is a definition which is determined in a "law" not all laws are written with morally correct outcome.

    So for instance you kill someone; the law says you are guilty and get the death penalty; is that morally correct ?; in most civil countries absolutely not.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Dutch,...NO......With the "Stand your Ground" laws in Florida (and several other states) you can legally kill someone. Just ask George Zimmerman. You can hunt them, follow them/track them down, confront them, then kill them..... because you felt threatened.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    Tony Johnson Wrote: Dutch,...NO......With the "Stand your Ground" laws in Florida (and several other states) you can legally kill someone. Just ask George Zimmerman. You can hunt them, follow them/track them down, confront them, then kill them..... because you felt threatened.
    Well we finally found the definition of 'legitimate wrongdoing'! Hunting down and killing someone, but claiming self defense. Everyone knows it's wrong, but certain states consider it legitimate. Cops do it all the time. Why not let average citizens do this 'legitimate wrongdoing' as well?! (I feel the need to state that I am being utterly sarcastic right now...)
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    Dutch Wrote:
    johnnycee Wrote: legitimate, means legal, morally correct, wrongdoing means not legal, not morally correct, how are the two thoughts compatible? From a legal standpoint it seems they are not, but on a emotional level I guess you could rationalize it.
    J.C. "legal" is not always morally correct; "legal" is a definition which is determined in a "law" not all laws are written with morally correct outcome.

    So for instance you kill someone; the law says you are guilty and get the death penalty; is that morally correct ?; in most civil countries absolutely not.





    Perhaps I should have said "legitimate means legal or morally correct", as far as killing someone in self defense it is legal and morally correct.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    The George Zimmerman killing being an example of killing in self defense when only GZ had a gun ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
    I guess GZ could be a cop in Ferguson.
    What did both victims have in common ? They were young African American males who were walking. Neither is walking today. That is scary isn't it.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    Not to retry that case all over again but deadly force may be applied when ones life or that of another is in immediate danger of being killed, this is what the jury ruled, no matter what the opinion of others may say, you have to remember that both sides need not have to have weapons for one side to claim self-defense.
  • Liberal
    Independent
    Durham, NH
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    Or, when you just don't like the looks of a person. Tis the American way - no?
  • Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    I must have missed that show (of Rachel Maddow) where she used the term "legitimate wrongdoing". Does anybody know the EXACT SENTENCE where she used that terminology? That would go a long way toward figuring it all out. By the way I try NEVER to miss her show. Or else record it.
    I get more news in one hour on her show, than on MOST other channels in a year. (Just a tiny hint of exaggeration, but you know what I mean).
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    pr Wrote: Or, when you just don't like the looks of a person. Tis the American way - no?
    That is just your opinion but it is not the law.