Forum Thread

10 Natural Resources in Trouble

Reply to ThreadDisplaying 8 Posts
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    According to an article that I just read on AOL, the following 10 natural resources could become GONE in the near future. The site shows the first one and then there are arrows to take you to the second one and so forth.

    http://www.tested.com/science/466740-10-earths-natural-resources-have-almost-dr...

    I thought it was very interesting. Just takes a few minutes to become aware of these issues.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Helium? Wow. Never would have even considered that in this conversation. Interesting, albeit pretty terrifying list. Thanks for sharing.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    The one that very much surprised me was Top Soil. That would be devastating to the ability to produce food. 60 years (said to be) left. Most of us will be long gone but not the next generation, children - grand children and their loved ones.
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    TJ Wrote: The one that very much surprised me was Top Soil. That would be devastating to the ability to produce food. 60 years (said to be) left. Most of us will be long gone but not the next generation, children - grand children and their loved ones.
    Thanks for sharing this. It was quite interesting, and really sad, reading through all these.

    The top soil one also scares me the most. If the thought of running out of food doesn't spring us into action, I just don't know what will. The coral reefs disappearing are also terrifying to think about. Losing over half of the worlds edible fish would be a catastrophe unlike humans have ever witnessed. Billions of people across this world almost rely solely on fish as their main source of food. The loss of that will bring about a chain reaction no nation is prepared to handle.

    This is what happens when we have a large chunk of the population that only thinks about the here and now. Almost all of these can be directly linked to climate change and our inability to get out of this way of thinking that the only thing we can do is pillage our earth in search for energy sources and other things we are dependent on in modern society. Instead of investing heavily in new technologies to not be dependent on our earths finite resources, we stick our heads in the sand and charge full steam ahead. It's really quite sad.

    I can't tell you how many people I've talked to that are my fathers age who, even if they are willing to admit that climate change is real, still have the opinion that it just isn't a priority to them because they will be dead before it does anything to them personally. That is a horrendous way to look at things, but unfortunately that is the modern day Republican party in a nutshell. Put blinders over our eyes, keep acting like it's not real, and then bank on dying before everything goes awry. What a way to run a government...
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    This stupid site does not work properly; can't delete the above.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Top Soil? pls sent me some; the soil here is horrible. Anyway I hope they keep the top soil in Napa Valley for a while; can't do without my Chardonnay.
    Your statement; we will be gone,does not sound so nice! But I guess AMC lives forever and does not need topsoil on Mars.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Everybody needs food. Always will. Some areas are not good for growing food so we all need farms/farmers...... This issue of top soil very much concerns me. I think the solution is (as in Alaska) many more people should have small greenhouses. Doesn't work in huge cities - I know. But in suburbia it sure could. Next step is compost. Anyone with a large yard knows you have a huge amount of grass clippings, Dried leaves in the fall, pine needles, and small sticks (preferably dried/dead sticks). Mix and turn on occasion, wait and not only do you have dirt, you have compost which is the best, most nutritional dirt. Used in containers eliminates waste.....and minimizes the need of water as it's specifically applied. To some I'm sure this sounds extreme but if production of food becomes an issue, this sounds like something that could be done. You won't have grain for breads but you would have vegetables and in hungry times that would be very valuable.

    Garbage men collect recyclables perhaps the USA should consider collecting yard waste to make compost. Locally they collect Christmas trees and shred them for production of compost. It has to go somewhere and the city uses it somehow. It would take large specialized trucks but if it equals bread and potatoes (even at higher prices) it's something to think about. Dutch, you can fill your greenhouse with grapes for the Chardonnay. That's what's great about America, we all get to choose (unless you live in Manhattan or Chicago).

    Jared, I agree that losing the coral reefs would be very bad. You're right if levels of fish decrease the world would starve. Through over consumption (Japan) of Tuna, it's numbers are dangerously low. US has quotas to limit the yearly catch. In other parts of the world they use huge nets and collect thousands of tons at a time. Because there's a market. Follow the money.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    TJ Wrote: Everybody needs food. Always will. Some areas are not good for growing food so we all need farms/farmers...... This issue of top soil very much concerns me. I think the solution is (as in Alaska) many more people should have small greenhouses. Doesn't work in huge cities - I know. But in suburbia it sure could. Next step is compost. Anyone with a large yard knows you have a huge amount of grass clippings, Dried leaves in the fall, pine needles, and small sticks (preferably dried/dead sticks). Mix and turn on occasion, wait and not only do you have dirt, you have compost which is the best, most nutritional dirt. Used in containers eliminates waste.....and minimizes the need of water as it's specifically applied. To some I'm sure this sounds extreme but if production of food becomes an issue, this sounds like something that could be done. You won't have grain for breads but you would have vegetables and in hungry times that would be very valuable.

    Garbage men collect recyclables perhaps the USA should consider collecting yard waste to make compost. Locally they collect Christmas trees and shred them for production of compost. It has to go somewhere and the city uses it somehow. It would take large specialized trucks but if it equals bread and potatoes (even at higher prices) it's something to think about. Dutch, you can fill your greenhouse with grapes for the Chardonnay. That's what's great about America, we all get to choose (unless you live in Manhattan or Chicago).

    Jared, I agree that losing the coral reefs would be very bad. You're right if levels of fish decrease the world would starve. Through over consumption (Japan) of Tuna, it's numbers are dangerously low. US has quotas to limit the yearly catch. In other parts of the world they use huge nets and collect thousands of tons at a time. Because there's a market. Follow the money.
    Hey Tony, I guess grapes are not doing very well here in south FL, way too hot and bad soil; on top of that I have no "green" thumb; it will be in no time a schriveled little "nothings" in my hands. So the best solution is "buy" it!