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Super Typhoon Neoguri Has Japan in its Crosshairs

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  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
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    A once in a generation super typhoon is racing towards Japan and it's ailing nuclear reactors that are still causing trouble after the devastating 2011 earthquake and ensuing tsunami. The incoming storm has winds sustaining 150 miles per hour, but it is expected to weaken as it makes landfall.

    The two main nuclear power plants still reeling from the 2011 tsunami should not be directly hit, but there are various other nuclear power plants directly in the line of the storm. The plants managers insist they have the capability to handle the storm and have plans in place to deal with the expected flooding. The other good news is that Japan's nuclear plants are still shut down and have not been given permission to reopen after the 2011 storm. While this is a positive development, it is not without risks because there is still nuclear fuel inside all of their reactors that continue to need to be cooled.

    Has anyone been following the storm? How many more 'super storms' will it take for deniers of global climate change to wake up and take their blinders off that our actions have consequences?
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    jaredsxtn Wrote: A once in a generation super typhoon is racing towards Japan and it's ailing nuclear reactors that are still causing trouble after the devastating 2011 earthquake and ensuing tsunami. The incoming storm has winds sustaining 150 miles per hour, but it is expected to weaken as it makes landfall.

    The two main nuclear power plants still reeling from the 2011 tsunami should not be directly hit, but there are various other nuclear power plants directly in the line of the storm. The plants managers insist they have the capability to handle the storm and have plans in place to deal with the expected flooding. The other good news is that Japan's nuclear plants are still shut down and have not been given permission to reopen after the 2011 storm. While this is a positive development, it is not without risks because there is still nuclear fuel inside all of their reactors that continue to need to be cooled.

    Has anyone been following the storm? How many more 'super storms' will it take for deniers of global climate change to wake up and take their blinders off that our actions have consequences?
    On the news Okinawa island was mentioned where we are occupy-ers; they had to disperse all the planes to some other places; again it shows that we still have our army all over the place at enormous cost since WWII. When are we going to cut back on waste here? We invented long range aircraft a long time ago so what is the need for these bases?