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GM Failed The Public, Ignition Switch Malfunction Kills 13 Drivers (so far)

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  • Center Left
    Independent
    Dallas, TX
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    General Motors is making all kinds of headlines due to its failure to recall their faulty ignition switches in various 2000 model vehicles. So far, over a million vehicles are reported to be a part of this ignition switch issue. The company first knew of the issue back in 2001. Four years later, '05 lead them to a cost-benefit analysis report that recently surfaced, deciding that it was going to be too costly to do anything. So, they essentially did nothing. What would have been appropriate behavior, a massive recall. The cost the report suggested per car would have been about $1.00 a vehicle.

    Apparently there is a little spring looking piece in these cars that is just a little too short, causing vehicles to randomly malfunction by turning the ignition to "OFF" or "Accessory Mode"; power steering, power brakes, seat belts and air bags just suddenly don't work. 13 deaths and 32 crashes have so far come out directly because of the faulty ignition switches in various GM vehicles.

    How can General Motors get away with not recalling vehicles that have faulty ignition switches, especially when there are 13 examples of it killing people?? The only thing that GM has done, as far as I can gather from the news stories is suggest that you don't weigh down the ignition switch by carrying any other keys except for the car key. So, no house keys or big key chain accessories, etc. That's their grand solution.

    The Daily Show ran this report saying that GM more or less gets to fall into a grey area of corporate liability, thanks to the fact that they filed for a form of bankruptcy after the recall should have happened, but before it came out to the public. In what world does this make sense, or sound remotely fair to you at all?
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Charlotte, NC
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    It doesn't make any sense at all. As many years as I have spent working in a automotive shop (both as a service advisor, and a mechanic), there are a few things I have learned. One being dealers (american dealers) very rarely ever take blame or consider large scale recalls for EXTREMELY well known issues. You would be amazed as to how many problems with your vehicle stem right from the engineers cozy desk. Sometimes with 100% intention to get you back into their home shop to charge you for repairs. Or a never ending string of repairs that are timed perfectly to break at a certain mileage or fatigue level. It's amazing and incredibly frustrating how to the big scale process works for large auto manufactures.
  • Liberal
    Other Party
    Llos Angeles, CA
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    ClayTaylorNC Wrote: It doesn't make any sense at all. As many years as I have spent working in a automotive shop (both as a service advisor, and a mechanic), there are a few things I have learned. One being dealers (american dealers) very rarely ever take blame or consider large scale recalls for EXTREMELY well known issues. You would be amazed as to how many problems with your vehicle stem right from the engineers cozy desk. Sometimes with 100% intention to get you back into their home shop to charge you for repairs. Or a never ending string of repairs that are timed perfectly to break at a certain mileage or fatigue level. It's amazing and incredibly frustrating how to the big scale process works for large auto manufactures.
    Funny, they blame workers for all the woes at the big 3
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    The automotive industry should copy how this is done in civil aviation; the systems are there, so just apply it. Vendors should adhere to that as well.
    The total stupidity is using the same partnumber for a modified switch; at least they should have given it a "dash" number.