Forum Thread

Major Gas Explosion Collapses Two Buildings in Harlem

Reply to ThreadDisplaying 5 Posts
  • Strongly Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Portland, OR
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    A major explosion caused two buildings in Harlem to collapse, killing two and injuring scores more. A dozen people are missing, as well.

    The explosion occurred roughly fifteen minutes after a resident in a nearby building reported the smell of natural gas to authorities, but the building had collapsed before they were able to arrive to investigate. Multiple residents claimed they have reported the smell of gas to authorities repeatedly in recent weeks but the odor had persisted.

    Is anyone following this tragedy? What do you think should happen if it is confirmed that residents have been repeatedly reporting the smell of gas and nothing was done about it?
  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Tenants Complain About Gas Smell Before Deadly Explosion In New York City

    In reading news clips it certainly sounds like residents had been complaining about gas smell. But it's not clear from the article that anyone made the complaint directly to the Con Edison gas company until the last tragic event.

    "A tenant in one of the destroyed buildings, Ruben Borrero, said residents had complained to the landlord about smelling gas as recently as Tuesday.

    "A few weeks ago, Borrero said, city fire officials were called about the odor, which he said was so bad that a tenant on the top floor broke open the door to the roof for ventilation.

    "The fire department said a check of its records found no instances in the past month in which tenants of the two buildings reported gas odors or leaks.

    "Edward Foppiano, a Con Ed senior vice president, said there was only one gas odor complaint on record with the utility from either address, and it was last May, at the building next door to Borrero's. It was a small leak in customer piping and was fixed, he said."

    -------------------

    In my home town of Colorado Springs, we are constantly told if we smell gas, to call the Utilities Company. They will respond immediately. They treat every gas smell as an emergency, and if you call their number, you can by-pass any wait in line to report the leak.

    I wonder if the tenants of the building even knew who to call. The landlord may be culpable if he didn't respond to the tenant's calls.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    Schmidt Wrote: Tenants Complain About Gas Smell Before Deadly Explosion In New York City

    In reading news clips it certainly sounds like residents had been complaining about gas smell. But it's not clear from the article that anyone made the complaint directly to the Con Edison gas company until the last tragic event.

    "A tenant in one of the destroyed buildings, Ruben Borrero, said residents had complained to the landlord about smelling gas as recently as Tuesday.

    "A few weeks ago, Borrero said, city fire officials were called about the odor, which he said was so bad that a tenant on the top floor broke open the door to the roof for ventilation.

    "The fire department said a check of its records found no instances in the past month in which tenants of the two buildings reported gas odors or leaks.

    "Edward Foppiano, a Con Ed senior vice president, said there was only one gas odor complaint on record with the utility from either address, and it was last May, at the building next door to Borrero's. It was a small leak in customer piping and was fixed, he said."

    -------------------

    In my home town of Colorado Springs, we are constantly told if we smell gas, to call the Utilities Company. They will respond immediately. They treat every gas smell as an emergency, and if you call their number, you can by-pass any wait in line to report the leak.

    I wonder if the tenants of the building even knew who to call. The landlord may be culpable if he didn't respond to the tenant's calls.
    I had a simular situation in the Netherlands; the basement smelled like gas; called the plumber; he said my house was built in the 1930's; at that time they used "hennep" and "caulk" to seal the pipes; of course this was over time totally deteriorated. I guess in the old buildings in N.Y. this must be the same problem; so New Yorkers wake up and smell the gas!!!
  • Independent
    Widefield, CO
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        

    Sounds to me like the owner did what he should have and the tenant is trying to set himself up to sue based off the Slumlord laws... Even in Harlem they keep good records of who calls 911 or the fire department and if they don't have records showing he called, I don't think he really did call. Also if its so bad they can smell it on the top floor (highly unlikely considering natural gas is heavier than oxygen) almost everyone in the building would have called the owner, utilities, and/or fire department.

  • Liberal Democrat
    Democrat
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Are you sure you want to delete this post?
        
    RanmaMOJ Wrote:

    Sounds to me like the owner did what he should have and the tenant is trying to set himself up to sue based off the Slumlord laws... Even in Harlem they keep good records of who calls 911 or the fire department and if they don't have records showing he called, I don't think he really did call. Also if its so bad they can smell it on the top floor (highly unlikely considering natural gas is heavier than oxygen) almost everyone in the building would have called the owner, utilities, and/or fire department.

    Natural gas is considerably lighter than air...0.7 kg/m3 for natural gas versus 1.2 kg/m3 for air

    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/gas-density-d_158.html