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Asiana crash at SFO 6 months ago

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  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdHkt3KGJSI

    This story was just on CNN (minutes ago). Happened 6 months ago.... Why just on the news today ? Apparently a teen girl was thrown from the flight. Survived. Was covered with the foam that they spray. Ended up getting ran over twice by emergency vehicles. Now, her family is suing. Terrible tragedy. Airline: Asiana, Airport: San Francisco. Footage taken by a citizen / random witness. Crash is blamed on pilots entering the runway too low.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    This story came out months ago, right after the crash happened. CNN is just reporting it again because the family is suing the city of San Fransisco. That's the American way---sue everyone and everything until you get paid off. There's plenty of blood-sucking lawyers who will take the case...for a cut of the money, of course.

    This girl would not have been lying on the ground next to the remains of a crashed and burning airplane if the pilots had done their job correctly.

    The people MOST responsible are the pilots and the airline.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    Yes they're being sued. I think that's appropriate. While fire fighters don't usually deal with tragedies at an airport, maybe next time there's a fire to be put out...... They'll look at the ground before spraying 2,000 gallons of foam. Ya never know, you just might cover up a survivor.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    On the news today, one of the firefighters stated that they saw her and thought that she was a fatality , and that the first truck went around her, and that their first duty was to assist the passengers still alive in the burning aircraft and to assist them in exiting the aircraft, the subsequent truck on the scene started to lay down the foam agent that eventually covered the young lady and that was how the tragic event that claimed her life began to take shape. A really tragic series of events, I don't think the FF's are at fault in any way, you have a burning aircraft with no knew how much fuel was left on board, screaming passengers trying to exit the burning aircraft, debris all over the place, a truly chaotic scene, and the blood suckers want to sue the FF's , the girls parents are entitled to compensation but from the airline and maybe the pilots insurance , but not from the FF's.

  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    The FF thought she was a fatality........not yet. Someone should have checked. As customers go, I think that she was first in line. As a result of fate. Sure FF are often hero's but it doesn't mean that they are infallible or unable to learn a lesson. I'd be happy with the FF admitting that they made a terrible mistake and that they'll include this life lesson in future training.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    It's called triage, you have an airline crash, bodies on the ground, people who are alive and screaming in a burning aircraft do you spend time trying to decide if this person laying outside the aircraft is dead or not, time which you have precious little of because of the fire, this is not a mistake , it's triage, how many lives were saved by the decision to prosecute the fire as soon as possible, this is truly a tragedy but the FF's are not at fault.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    I'm betting they could have checked for a pulse in less than 30 seconds. Which they should have.
    We may have to agree to disagree. Just because you wear a uniform and/or badge doesn't mean you
    can't or don't make mistakes. With your thought process cops are never wrong either. Is that what you
    believe. Naïve.

    On the CNN video (telecast today) a person on the ground was yelling at a person driving a fire truck. He was
    yelling for them to stop because they almost ran over her. If they were that close, a pulse could have and should
    have been taken. If they had she may be alive right now. Another survivor. Wouldn't that be nice.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    TJ Wrote: I'm betting they could have checked for a pulse in less than 30 seconds. Which they should have.
    We may have to agree to disagree. Just because you wear a uniform and/or badge doesn't mean you
    can't or don't make mistakes. With your thought process cops are never wrong either. Is that what you
    believe. Naïve.

    On the CNN video (telecast today) a person on the ground was yelling at a person driving a fire truck. He was
    yelling for them to stop because they almost ran over her. If they were that close, a pulse could have and should
    have been taken. If they had she may be alive right now. Another survivor. Wouldn't that be nice.
    Tony, I no longer wear a uniform and I do know first hand that cops can be wrong, it's as you said ,we agree to disagree, I happened to be at variety of various emergency scenes and things don't always go according to plan, although I never was at a crash site of an airliner, but there were few times involving fire and the danger of a explosion was present that I was there, and seconds do count , is the right decision made every time, of course not, but I suppose going for the greater good was a motivating factor in that particular case. Crisis debriefing after the event always reveals flaws in the system and less than perfect decisions made by those on scene, does it rise to the level of civil or criminal liability, I don't think so, but you would not want a first responder deciding what if he /she is going to be liable for the action they are about to take before taking that action, again remember seconds count, it's unfortunate we now live in a litigious society where blame is always a matter of dollars signs.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    johnnycee Wrote:
    TJ Wrote: I'm betting they could have checked for a pulse in less than 30 seconds. Which they should have.
    We may have to agree to disagree. Just because you wear a uniform and/or badge doesn't mean you
    can't or don't make mistakes. With your thought process cops are never wrong either. Is that what you
    believe. Naïve.

    On the CNN video (telecast today) a person on the ground was yelling at a person driving a fire truck. He was
    yelling for them to stop because they almost ran over her. If they were that close, a pulse could have and should
    have been taken. If they had she may be alive right now. Another survivor. Wouldn't that be nice.
    Tony, I no longer wear a uniform and I do know first hand that cops can be wrong, it's as you said ,we agree to disagree, I happened to be at variety of various emergency scenes and things don't always go according to plan, although I never was at a crash site of an airliner, but there were few times involving fire and the danger of a explosion was present that I was there, and seconds do count , is the right decision made every time, of course not, but I suppose going for the greater good was a motivating factor in that particular case. Crisis debriefing after the event always reveals flaws in the system and less than perfect decisions made by those on scene, does it rise to the level of civil or criminal liability, I don't think so, but you would not want a first responder deciding what if he /she is going to be liable for the action they are about to take before taking that action, again remember seconds count, it's unfortunate we now live in a litigious society where blame is always a matter of dollars signs.
    I guess it is a pure human error; if you are in a huge firetruck going to another huge burning plane with all kind of debris and smoke around; then your visible focus as a driver is straight ahead and not focussed on the ground. Your eyes and vision area and brains can absorb only so much. So something like this was bound to happen. Suing the city is kind of the American way and wrong; indeed if they want to sue then they should sue Asiana Airlines.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    You are right Dutch suing is the American way.

    Suing the people most responsible for this death is not as important as suing the people with the most money. Blood-sucking lawyer rule number 1: Always sue the people who are most likely to get you the most money.

    The blood-sucking lawyers have decided that a better chance of getting more money is from the firefighters and the city. If they thought that suing the airline and the pilots was more profitable then that's who they would be going after.

    Always follow the money.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    I agree. It's sad that Fire fighters may be sued. That means the citizens end up paying. A reply below the video in the link questioned why there aren't cameras on the runways. I agree we shouldn't have to try and get details from an amateur video taken from far away.