Forum Thread

Colorado Is Officially Selling Pot Now

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  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    January 1st, 2014 marked the day, marijuana is now being sold and purchased completely legally and openly in Colorado. Well, at least statewide and under state laws. And, some cities in CO have decided not to participate. And, federal law of prohibition still stands. (But, they have officially decided to back off and "see what happens".) But, still.. all those asterisks aside, you can go into a dispensary in Denver (no matter your residency) and openly purchase weed. All you need is an ID showing that you are at least 21 years of age. Been a LOOONNG time coming. Washington state is a few months away from opening their doors officially as well.

    Any members here from Colorado? How crazy is it, say in Denver? Anyone been to and/or purchased legal marijuana yet? I am curious of your experiences and/or stories from friends. Hook me up on the inside scoop; think it will be the success that it appears to be? ...I am jealous. I wish my state would have been the first to do this. And, not just because I personally enjoy the experience. But, because I believe this should have never been made illegal to begin with.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Let me summarize the confused state of Colorado, at least in some towns.

    Marijuana is illegal in the United States, but legal in the state of Colorado, but illegal in some cities in the state of Colorado which is in the United States.

    Glad we got that cleared up!
  • Democrat
    Missouri
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    So, what do employers do when their employees show up with drug analysis reports that they have been smoking pot? I know what the Federal Law will be as for Federal employees, they go straight to counseling and/or employment terminated. If your employer indicates no Pot smoking, what is the law? Does the employer have a legal stand in this issue protecting his/her company on the matter of Marijuana use?

    I still find it Colorado stupid for placing more priority on Marijuana than Gun Control. Must be the money, kids and murders don't count. Colorado would rather smoke marijuana than save a child from gun violence. You vote for a money since marijuana enterprise gets revenue and Gun Control does nothing for gaining revenue. Enjoy that marijuana Colorado while you watch your children be killed and the mass killings continue. Don't worry about emotions, the dope will make you feel better.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    An employer can still refuse to hire anyone for almost any reason (except race, religion, etc). And I'm not sure what Colorado employment laws but if it is a right to work state, then they can be terminated for almost any reason as well. I know there are hospitals that prohibit their employees from using tobacco products. Tobacco is a completely legal substance but the hospitals that enforce this believe that maintaining a healthy image is part of their business and it would be hypocritical not to have such rules.

    So, in short, people can still be fired for smoking marijuana.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Zach and amc just for the sake of argument/discussion let's say that an employee, lets call him Mr Stoner lives in a city in Colorado where marijuana is legal but works in a city in Colorado or another neighboring state where marijuana is still illegal. Marijuana use is forbidden by his employer but he tests positive after an "incident" or "accident" on his job?

    What then?

    I can envision it happening, and also the lawsuits that ensue. A lawyer for the "guilty" employee, let's call him Mr Scumbag, could argue that it was totally legal for him to partake of the "product" in his home, and during his off work hours.
  • Democrat
    Philadelphia, PA
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    It's also legal to drink if you are old enough, but most places frown upon their employee's coming to work drunk/high and if they don't take steps to alleviate the problem employee they will then become liable for any injuries suffered by anyone because of their (Employers) lack of concern for a drug addled employee.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Central, FL
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    I obviously don't think anyone should show up for work after drinking or smoking. But if you do either or both in the evening in your home and don't report to work until the next morning, you'll be completely sober by morning. I too think that it should be legalized or at least decriminalized. Use should be restricted to ways and places where it doesn't effect the safety of others. The dispensaries seem to do an excellent job of producing very good quality supplies (from tv shows on the topic) but I believe the prices are very expensive. I know that if you have a medical card in Colorado you can grow up to 4 plants for personal use. It must be grown in doors.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    jamesn Wrote: Zach and amc just for the sake of argument/discussion let's say that an employee, lets call him Mr Stoner lives in a city in Colorado where marijuana is legal but works in a city in Colorado or another neighboring state where marijuana is still illegal. Marijuana use is forbidden by his employer but he tests positive after an "incident" or "accident" on his job?

    What then?

    I can envision it happening, and also the lawsuits that ensue. A lawyer for the "guilty" employee, let's call him Mr Scumbag, could argue that it was totally legal for him to partake of the "product" in his home, and during his off work hours.
    No legal action would taken against him, because no law was broken. His employer would have the right to terminate his employment because they have that option as an employer anyway.

    I'm not really sure what the confusion is about. Employers can fire people over Facebook posts, which are clearly not illegal, if they so choose and they decide that it damages the image of the company.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Zach ..."I'm not really sure what all the confusion is about"...

    Obviously you do not know lawyers and how they work. They can twist and distort everything. Black is white, up is down, right is wrong...all for the allmighty dollar.

    You take Mr Stoner and Mr Drinker and they both enjoy thir "product" in their own home in their off work hours in a location where it is legal. Both go to work 36 hours later and both are sober. Alcohol is removed from the system in several hours but marijuana is detectable for about a month. Both are in an accident, both are tested, Mr Drinker is cleared, but Mt Stoner has marijuana in his system and is fired.

    Both chose to do a legal product but Mr Stoner is fired because his body still has traces of his legal product while Mr Drinker does not. Mr Stoner can't "prove" that he was completely sober because he still has the detectable substance in his body.

    Life isn't fair and neither are lawyers.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    Lawyers probably wouldn't be involved. It would not be a legal issue. It's a private company policy issue. The only way lawyers would be involved is if the employee decided to file a wrongful termination suit, but any company can easily protect themselves from that but having a paragraph in their employee handbook that says they choose not to employ people who smoke weed. I'm not saying there won't be speed bumps along the way, but it's nothing that shouldn't be to hard to iron out.

    Additionally, you have some facts wrong about alcohol. Presence can be detected in saliva for 1-5 days. It can be detected in hair for up to 90 days, just like marijuana.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    Also, there are blood tests to determine how "high" people are at a given time just like there are blood tests to determine how drunk people are at the time. You can measure the amount of active THC in the bloodstream. Urine tests are different because they measure metabolized THC in the body.
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    Lawyer lets call him Mr Scumbag files lawsuit because one legal product (marijuana) is prohibited while another (alcohol) is allowed. Both products cause temporary impairment, but allow workers to be sober for work 36 hours later, so due to the double standard by the company, the Scumbag/Stoner lawsuit wins and the company goes broke.

    Another victory for the druggies.

    My understanding of the detection times is based on my previous employer and their methods of testing from several years ago, so I'll take your word for it. Let's say this company uses the same detection methods that my company used in past years.

    At the end of the day, the lawyers will find some way to sue and probably win, because of the employees who did the same thing were treated differently. In America anyone can sue anyone for any reason. May not win but anyone can sue.
  • Independent
    Ft.myers, FL
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    jamesn Wrote: Lawyer lets call him Mr Scumbag files lawsuit because one legal product (marijuana) is prohibited while another (alcohol) is allowed. Both products cause temporary impairment, but allow workers to be sober for work 36 hours later, so due to the double standard by the company, the Scumbag/Stoner lawsuit wins and the company goes broke.

    Another victory for the druggies.

    My understanding of the detection times is based on my previous employer and their methods of testing from several years ago, so I'll take your word for it. Let's say this company uses the same detection methods that my company used in past years.

    At the end of the day, the lawyers will find some way to sue and probably win, because of the employees who did the same thing were treated differently. In America anyone can sue anyone for any reason. May not win but anyone can sue.
    Have you seen any "poor" lawyers lately? Message is thus become a lawyer!!
  • Other Party
    Nebraska
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    You're right Dutch, lawyers are the biggest bloodsuckers in America, except for maybe politicians. That would probably be a tossup.

    I've just been giving Zach some grief over the crazy marijuana laws in Colorado. I hope Zach won't take it personally, and don't think he will, and I don't consider marijuana much worse than booze or tobacco, and as far as causing problems with some people, and I know that even lottery tickets and casino gambling also cause people to spend their last dollars on things other than "necessities".

    I think we can all agree that the new marijuana laws are creating some pretty confusing scenerios.
  • Center Left
    Independent
    Denton, TX
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    jamesn Wrote: Lawyer lets call him Mr Scumbag files lawsuit because one legal product (marijuana) is prohibited while another (alcohol) is allowed. Both products cause temporary impairment, but allow workers to be sober for work 36 hours later, so due to the double standard by the company, the Scumbag/Stoner lawsuit wins and the company goes broke.

    Another victory for the druggies.

    My understanding of the detection times is based on my previous employer and their methods of testing from several years ago, so I'll take your word for it. Let's say this company uses the same detection methods that my company used in past years.

    At the end of the day, the lawyers will find some way to sue and probably win, because of the employees who did the same thing were treated differently. In America anyone can sue anyone for any reason. May not win but anyone can sue.
    I'm confused on why the lawyer is filing a lawsuit in the first place. What is his legal argument?

    Is he trying to say that companies can't have policies that are stricter than state laws? If that is the case, then this is not a new issue that will have to be addressed with this "crazy law." Companies have been doing this for decades. Some companies allow their employees to drink but not smoke. Some prohibit "party" pictures posted on social networks like Facebook. Technically, people are free to do these things anyway because none of them are illegal, but an employer can choose to have you not represent his/her business if you do.

    I'm not saying that there won't be a few lawyers that try to argue against this, but the precedent has been long set and it's extremely reasonable so it's unlikely that any of them will get any large settlements out of it.