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  • This is the truth that President of the United States is bringing a real change in the shape of world politics through his truth and this is the reason that now people of tribal areas situated on Pak-Afghan border are fully supporting him. Actually corrupt rulers of Pakistan are still using the menace of terrorism for earning dollars.
  • World leaders have fretted for years that terrorists may try to steal one of Pakistan’s nuclear bombs and detonate it in a foreign country. But some Karachi residents say the real nuclear nightmare is unfolding here in Pakistan’s largest and most volatile city. On the edge of Karachi, on an earthquake-prone seafront vulnerable to tsunamis and not far from where al-Qaeda militants nearly hijacked a Pakistan navy vessel last fall, China is supplying two large nuclear reactors for energy-starved Pakistan. The new plants, utilizing a cutting-edge design not yet in use anywhere in the world, will each supply 1,100 megawatts to Pakistan’s national energy grid.
  • The United States on Tuesday declared Pakistani Taliban leader Mullah Fazlullah a "global terrorist," making it a crime to engage in transactions with the man behind the Dec. 16 attack in which 134 children at a Peshawar school were killed. The State Department said in a statement the formal designation also allows the U.S. government to seize any of his property or interests in the United States, including those under the control of U.S. citizens.
  • It began like any other morning in Pakistan's Army Public School in the northwestern city of Peshawar. Students pored over their books. Teachers ruffled through their notes and gave lectures. In an instant, the peace was shattered - gunfire, smoke and dead bodies strewn across the school's halls and corridors, with crazed militants rushing from room to room shooting randomly at pupils and adults. At least 130 Pakistanis, most of them children, were killed in the broad daylight attack on the military-run school on Tuesday, an assault lauded by Taliban insurgents as revenge for the killings of their own relatives by the Pakistani army.
  • Militants from the Pakistani Taliban have attacked a school in Peshawar, killing 141 people, 132 of them children, the military say. Pakistani officials say the attack is now over, with all of the attackers killed. A total of seven militants took part, according to the army. Scores of survivors are being treated in hospitals as frantic parents search for news of their children. The attack is the deadliest ever by the Taliban in Pakistan.
  • At least 45 people were killed on Sunday when a suicide bomber blew himself up near the Pakistani-Indian border, police said, just after a daily ceremony when troops from both sides simultaneously lower the two nations' flags. The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, saying it was a response to the Pakistani army's actions against their positions in tribal areas straddling Pakistan's border with Afghanistan. The suicide bombing took place in a car park on the Pakistani side at least 500 meters from the border with India. No Indian troops were hurt in the attack.
  • India and Pakistan have fought four wars since 1947 and had several crises that went to the brink of war. Both tested nuclear weapons in 1998. Now tensions are escalating between the two again. It began in May, when a heavily armed squad of Pakistani terrorists from Lashkar e Tayyiba (Army of the Pure) attacked India’s consulate in Herat, in western Afghanistan. They planned to massacre Indian diplomats on the eve of the inauguration of India’s new Hindu nationalist prime minister, Narendra Modi. The consulate’s security forces killed the LeT terrorists first, preventing a crisis. Since LeT is a proxy of Pakistan's military intelligence service known as the ISI, Indian intelligence officials assume the Herat attack was coordinated with higher-ups in Pakistan.
  • Malala Yousafzai, who won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, is hailed around the world as a champion of women's rights who stood up bravely against the Taliban to defend her beliefs. But in her deeply conservative homeland, many view her with suspicion as an outcast or even as a Western creation aimed at damaging Pakistan's image abroad. Malala, now aged 17, became globally known in 2012 when Taliban gunmen almost killed her for her passionate advocacy of women's right to education.
  • One is Muslim, the other Hindu. One a Pakistani, the other Indian. One a school girl just starting out in life, the other a man with decades of experience.

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