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News Corp Scandals & Controversies
  • A new book being released by Gabriel Sherman accuses Roger Ailes, the CEO of Fox News, of a long pattern of sexist and misogynist behavior towards the women that work at the station. Ailes is accused of making unwanted advances towards women during job interviews, demanding that the women on Fox News show more legs, and complaining that he didn't spend money on a glass desk for the female hosts to wear pant suits.
  • Fox News chairman Roger Ailes has purportedly tried to use his influence to take over the small town of Garrison, N.Y. Ailes has purchased the towns small newspaper to ensure he controls the flow of information throughout the town and hired an editor that attacked any critic of the new direction the newspaper had taken. Ailes also reportedly shows up to town meetings with body guards and lawyers to try to intimidate the towns residents into submitting to his demand in rewriting the zoning laws that prevent him from future development. If that wasn't already enough, Ailes has also recruited Republican candidates more to his liking to run for a variety of town offices.
  • A forthcoming book by Gabriel Sherman interviews a woman that worked with Roger Ailes in the 1980's who claims that Mr. Ailes offered her a pay raise in exchange for weekly sex with him whenever he would like. Randi Harrison, the woman in question, claims that Mr. Ailes said he would pay her an extra $100 per week if she would agree to the demand.
  • The News Corporation faced accusations of hacking after media reports in Britain and Australia claimed that an affiliate of the media conglomerate had hacked into pay-television rivals to undermine their operations. According to the reports, NDS (a News Corp Affliate) undermined the competition by hiring hackers to crack the codes of smart cards associated with the satellite services of News Corporation’s rivals. The hackers supposedly posted those codes online or sold them on the black market, allowing viewers to pirate the competitors’ TV broadcasts without paying a subscription fee and costing them tens of millions of dollars.