Mark Udall

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Mark Udall News & Opinion ArticlesDisplaying 4 Items
  • When Mark Udall lost his Senate seat in the midterm elections, civil libertarians familiar with his efforts to inform Americans about the CIA and NSA had the same thought: Before leaving office, the Colorado Democrat should tell the public about the abuses the government is trying to hide. National-security officials are able to violate the Constitution and various statutes with impunity in large part because they classify their misbehavior as a state secret. It's a neat trick. To expose their lawbreaking, one must first break the law. But there is a check on this unscrupulous trick. Members of Congress can reveal classified information in their capacity as legislators without facing legal consequences. As the U.S.
  • When Mark Udall lost his Senate seat in the midterm elections, civil libertarians familiar with his efforts to inform Americans about the CIA and NSA had the same thought: Before leaving office, the Colorado Democrat should tell the public about the abuses the government is trying to hide. National-security officials are able to violate the Constitution and various statutes with impunity in large part because they classify their misbehavior as a state secret. It's a neat trick. To expose their lawbreaking, one must first break the law.
  • "IT'S EERIE HOW MUCH 2014 is like four years ago," says Craig Hughes, a Denver-based political consultant who ran Democrat Michael Bennet's successful 2010 Senate campaign. It's just after 10 a.m., and we're sitting in a coffee shop called Paris on the Platte. Hughes recounts how, back in 2010, all but one of the final 18 public polls conducted before Election Day showed Bennet losing. In recent weeks, Democratic Sen. Mark Udall has trailed Republican Rep. Cory Gardner in 11 of 12 polls. In 2010, pundits said that Bennet's campaign ran too many pro-choice advertisements; political commentators these days deride Udall as "Mark Uterus" because his campaign has relentlessly focused on reproductive rights and women's health.
  • There is perhaps no other state this election cycle that better reflects the lessons learned by both parties over the past four years than Colorado. In 2010, Republicans discovered the hard way that a bad candidate who says impolitic things can squander a winnable Senate race in even the most favorable of climates. And Democrats learned they could overcome discouraging odds with a playbook centered on the women’s vote (highlighting abortion and contraception) and spotlighting an “extremist” opponent.