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  • The day American shoppers lose their minds for moderately awesome, limited supply discounting is upon us! Black Friday is here, and some of the largest retailers across the country are following the annoyingly disturbing trend of opening their doors even earlier this year than the last.
  • The second round of open enrollment for Obamacare begins today, allowing those who didn't obtain health insurance last year the opportunity to get covered. If you are one of those individuals who didn't get health insurance during the first open enrollment, or if you are like me and want to search for new options, you have until February 15, 2015 to make your decision.
  • President Obama's deal with China to dramatically cut greenhouse gas emissions may go down as one of his lasting legacies once everything is said and done with his Administration. The deal, which was announced at a joint press conference, set far reaching goals of reducing carbon emissions that surprised most everyone over how much the two countries agreed to cut.
  • We have seen this story play out in countless midterm elections before. Members of the party the President belongs to run as far away from him as possible and members of the opposition try to tie members of the President's party to him at every turn.
  • Walmart, our nation's largest retailer, is cutting some 30,000 part-time employee's health care benefits, due to the rising costs for the company.
  • The instant access, video streaming juggernaut Netflix makes this claim on their YouTube homepage about their recent commitment and success with offering original content to subscribers: Netflix original series - The Future of Television is Here.

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  • On Thursday, United Airlines, the Wall Street Journal, the popular financial blog site ZeroHedge and the New York Stock Exchange all had to shut down their services for “technical reasons.” Although the Department of Homeland Security released a statement saying that there was “no sign of malicious activity” at the New York Stock Exchange, intellectual speculators quickly joined their financial peers to suggest these events were not coincidental and the result of a coordinated cyberattack.
  • To truly understand just how rigorous and intrusive the process to get security clearance for the federal government is, take a look a Standard Form 86. Formally known as the Questionnaire for National Security Positions, the document requires that an applicant disclose everything from mental illnesses, financial interests, and bankruptcy issues to any brush with the law and major or minor drug and alcohol use. The application also requires a thorough listing of an applicant’s family members, associates, or former roommates. At the bottom of each page, a potential employee must submit his or her social security number. Given the questionnaire’s length, that means if you’re filling out this document, you will write your social security number over 115 times.
  • The Federal Communications Commission let the rest of the country in on a big secret last Thursday: how it actually plans to make network neutrality (which it voted for two weeks earlier) work. In a massive 400-page PDF, the agency laid out its vision for net neutrality. Reading the document closely — as I've spent the past four days doing — reveals just how controversial the regulations will be. The concept of network neutrality has attracted broad public support, but translating that concept into specific rules turns out to be surprisingly tricky. Even after hundreds of pages of explanation, the FCC left a number of important questions unanswered.
  • It's an image that's familiar around the world: A group of young people, glued to their laptops or smart phones, lounging around a public space and taking advantage of free, wireless Internet. But in Cuba, this scene is far from ordinary. When the famed artist Kcho provided wi-fi at his cultural center some weeks ago, he established the first such venue in the country's history. Now, in a rapidly changing Cuba, milestones like this have become more commonplace. To its beneficiaries, free wi-fi is about more than gaining access to computer games and social media. It also involves establishing contact with the outside world. One 20-year-old at the cultural center was using wi-fi to chat with his father, who lives in the United States.
  • President Barack Obama will highlight plans next week to protect American consumers and businesses from cyber threats, a month after the most high-profile hacking attack on a U.S. company. Internet security became a national focus after a cyberattack on Sony Pictures that Washington blamed on North Korea. The attack and subsequent threats of violence against theaters prompted Sony to scale back its release of "The Interview", a comedy film that depicts the fictional assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.
  • For as outspoken as President Barack Obama has been about the gravity of North Korea's hack of Sony Pictures, in which he said the United States "will respond proportionally," he said Sunday that he doesn't consider the cyber intrusion "an act of war." "No, I don't think it was an act of war, I think it was an act of cybervandalism that was very costly, very expensive," Obama said in an interview with CNN aired on Sunday, adding, "We take it very seriously."
  • The North Korean hack of Sony Pictures that unleashed proprietary information, leaked embarrassing emails and brought the multi-billion dollar company's operations to its knees was unprecedented. But cyber security and intelligence experts warn that this is only the beginning. A CNN review of cyber attacks against federal agencies shows that the number of breaches into government systems is skyrocketing. "Espionage is happening at a rate we have never seen before," said Denise Zheng, a deputy director at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
  • The United States said on Thursday a cyber attack on Sony Pictures was a serious national security matter and the Obama administration was considering a proportional response, although the White House stopped short of blaming North Korea. U.S. government sources said on Wednesday that investigators had determined the attack was "state sponsored" and that North Korea was the government involved. A U.S. government official said on Thursday that U.S. investigators were looking into the possibility that Iran assisted North Korea.

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