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  • The instant access, video streaming juggernaut Netflix makes this claim on their YouTube homepage about their recent commitment and success with offering original content to subscribers: Netflix original series - The Future of Television is Here.
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  • The day American shoppers lose their minds for moderately awesome, limited supply discounting is upon us! Black Friday is here, and some of the largest retailers across the country are following the annoyingly disturbing trend of opening their doors even earlier this year than the last.
  • The second round of open enrollment for Obamacare begins today, allowing those who didn't obtain health insurance last year the opportunity to get covered. If you are one of those individuals who didn't get health insurance during the first open enrollment, or if you are like me and want to search for new options, you have until February 15, 2015 to make your decision.
  • President Obama's deal with China to dramatically cut greenhouse gas emissions may go down as one of his lasting legacies once everything is said and done with his Administration. The deal, which was announced at a joint press conference, set far reaching goals of reducing carbon emissions that surprised most everyone over how much the two countries agreed to cut.
  • We have seen this story play out in countless midterm elections before. Members of the party the President belongs to run as far away from him as possible and members of the opposition try to tie members of the President's party to him at every turn.
  • Walmart, our nation's largest retailer, is cutting some 30,000 part-time employee's health care benefits, due to the rising costs for the company.
  • There has been a lot of talk about the FCC destroying net neutrality. How former lobbyists and council of Verizon and Comcast have made their way on to the board of the FCC and how they have started enacting policy to make net neutrality a thing of the past.
  • Telecom giants Comcast and Time Warner Cable spent more than $32 million influencing Washington over the past year, in large part to sell its $45 billion mega-merger. In the end, they’re left with a dead deal, a sharp rebuke from regulators, and a harsh lesson that lobbying dollars only go so far. “I think Comcast has some extraordinarily able, smart, effective advocates, but there were limits to what they could do with the merits of the case,” said Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), a critic of the deal. “At the end of the day, the arguments just fell [apart] … I’ve argued a lot of cases in court, and there are some cases that are just unwinnable.”
  • In the 2004 blockbuster The Day After Tomorrow, abrupt climate change plunges the world into chaos. According to new research published Monday, the idea that underpins the film’s plot—that rapid Arctic ice melt could cause dramatic changes to the global climate system—just got one step closer to reality. Of particular concern are the profound changes happening in the Greenland ice sheet: It appears that the massive amount of freshwater from melting Greenland glaciers has now begun to slow the ocean’s circulating currents.
  • Jan 29 2015
    Top Movie Trailers to Debut This Sunday
    Top Movie Trailers to Debut This Sunday
    Jan 29 2015bleacherreport.com
    One of the most exciting parts of the Super Bowl each year are the commercials and movie trailers that air during the big game. During the 2015 edition, there will be several marquee ads fans will be looking to see. Several movie trailers have already released, but with the Super Bowl breaking up commercials into 30-second and 60-second spots, many fans are expecting new ads featuring previously unseen footage.
  • I saw American Sniper last night, and hated it slightly less than I expected to. Like most Clint Eastwood movies – and I like Clint Eastwood movies for the most part – it's a simple, well-lit little fairy tale with the nutritional value of a fortune cookie that serves up a neatly-arranged helping of cheers and tears for target audiences, and panics at the thought of embracing more than one or two ideas at any time. It's usually silly to get upset about the self-righteous way Hollywood moviemakers routinely turn serious subjects into baby food. Film-industry people angrily reject the notion that their movies have to be about anything (except things like "character" and "narrative" and "arc," subjects they can talk about endlessly).
  • North Korea was hit with more U.S. sanctions on Friday in response to what Washington said was its role in a cyberattack on Sony Pictures Entertainment, the White House said on Friday. The sanctions named three entities, including the country's military intelligence agency, as well as 10 North Korean government officials, among them individuals working in Iran, Syria, China, Russia and Namibia, according to the Treasury Department. here
  • The speculation that the next Bond might be black has Rushbo all hot and bothered. All the more reason to hope it happens.
  • The Sony Pictures hack is important, and the Sony Pictures hack is terrifying. In a series of cyberattacks that were first noticed on Nov. 24, a mysterious group calling itself the Guardians of Peace stole and subsequently leaked personal and medical information from every Sony Pictures employee, revealed scads of confidential internal information, left the company technologically crippled, and issued vague demands that “our request be met.” That last one increasingly appears to center on The Interview, a James Franco–Seth Rogen comedy about killing North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, which Sony is now offering theaters the choice of not showing. (As of today, the four largest movie-theater chains say they won’t screen the movie. Update, Dec. 17, 5:06 p.m.
  • Mike Nichols, 83, the director of matchless versatility who brought fierce wit, caustic social commentary, and wicked absurdity to such films, TV, and stage hits as The Graduate, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Angels in America, and Monty Python's Spamalot, died Wednesday evening.

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