Donald Trump

Controversies

Donald Trump Controversies & ScandalsDisplaying 81 - 100 of 453 Prev 1 .. 3 4 5 6 7 .. 23 Next
  • Representative Tom Price, Donald Trumps choice for Secretary of Health and Human Services, bought stock in a company that manufactures knee and hip implants and then introduced legislation that would have benefited both the company and himself days later. The company, Zimmer Biomet, then donated $1,000 to Representative Price's reelection campaign shortly thereafter. Update: ProPublica reported that "[o]n the same day the stockbroker for then-Georgia Congressman Tom Price bought him up to $90,000 of stock in six pharmaceutical companies last year, Price arranged to call a top U.S. health official, seeking to scuttle a controversial rule that could have hurt the firms’ profits and driven down their share prices, records obtained by ProPublica show."
  • Donald Trump's social media director publicly called for the defeat of Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan in the 2018 primary after Amash refused to vote for the House's Obamacare repeal. This is a violation of the "Hatch Act" which prohibits the use of one's office for political purposes.
  • Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is skipping a major NATO summit in Brussels and meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Washington, D.C. instead. The move has been described as "unprecedented" by a former US ambassador to NATO and "an unmitigated disaster" by another NATO expert. American allies have expressed concern that America is beginning to show they are not as committed to the NATO alliance and Tillerson's skipping of the conference and meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin later in April before he is set to meet with any of the NATO allies again.
  • Paul Manafort, Donald Trump's former campaign manager, apparently purchased homes in New York with cash. The FBI is investigation whether these purchases were legal and how he was able to pay for such extravagant expenses with cash.
  • Donald Trump asked a group of women attending a function for the Women's Empowerment Panel if they had ever heard of Susan B Anthony. During the same speech he also suggested that Harriet Tubman was “very, very courageous, believe me.”
  • Jared Kushner, Donald Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, met with the head of Russia's state owned bank under United States sanctions during the transition. The Trump Administration said that Kushner was acting as a campaign surrogate, but did not explain why they asked Kushner to speak with a bank that was under US Sanctions.
  • White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer told American Urban Radio Networks journalist April Ryan to "stop shaking [her] head" after Spicer dodged answering a direct question about Trump's connection with Russia.
  • Former National Security Michael Flynn discussed kidnapping exiled Turkish cleric Fethullah Gülen from his home in Pennsylvania and covertly transporting him back to Turkey where he is wanted for allegedly aiding an attempted coup against the Turkish government. Flynn denies partaking in the conversation, but former CIA head James Woolsey insists that the conversation did take place.
  • Paul Manafort, Donald Trump's former campaign manager, secretly worked with and received millions of dollars from a Russian oligarch to implement a plan that would "greatly benefit the Putin Government." Manafort was paid to develop and execute a strategy to "influence politics, business dealings and news coverage inside the United States, Europe and former Soviet republics to benefit President Vladimir Putin's government."
  • Donald Trump's transition team asked the Pentagon for photographs of various military vehicles that could be showcased during his inauguration parade. The Pentagon rebuffed Trump's request and said that military vehicles could not be used. Update: Trump initially denied this report, but leaked e-mails show that the conversation between the Trump team and the Pentagon did, in fact, take place.
  • Paul Manafort, Donald Trump's former campaign manager, is accused of laundering money he received from overthrown Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych and funneling the money to offshore bank accounts in Belize and Kyrgyzstan. Manafort had business dealing with the deposed leader, but the money laundering allegations only came to light after a Ukrainian lawmaker in the current parliament released them.
  • Donald Trump accused President Obama of ordering an illegal wiretap in Trump Tower during the election season. Trump sent a series of tweets that read "Terrible! Just found out that Obama had my "wires tapped" in Trump Tower just before the victory. Nothing found. This is McCarthyism!", "Is it legal for a sitting President to be "wire tapping" a race for president prior to an election? Turned down by court earlier. A NEW LOW!", and then finished with "How low has President Obama gone to tapp [sic] my phones during the very sacred election process. This is Nixon/Watergate. Bad (or sick) guy!" Multiple sources have come forward publicly to state that there is zero evidence to back up Trump's claims.
  • Donald Trump falsely accused Germany of not paying their fair share to NATO and then falsely claimed that money was owed to the United States. Trump tweeted "Despite what you have heard from the FAKE NEWS, I had a GREAT meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Nevertheless, Germany owes vast sums of money to NATO & the United States must be paid more for the powerful, and very expensive, defense it provides to Germany!" The money countries pay into NATO go into the NATO defense fund and not the treasury of the United States.
  • Donald Trump justified another weekend trip to his Mar-a-Lago resort by claiming that he was going to have a "major meeting" with Veterans Affairs officials over the weekend, but that meeting never took place and the White House did not explain why the meeting was cancelled mere hours after Donald Trump announced it.
  • Sebastian Gorka, a top national security adviser to Donald Trump, wore a medal given to him from a far-right Hungarian group with links to Nazi Germany during an inaugural ball for Donald Trump. Gorka wore a medal from the Hungarian Order or Heroes, a group that collaborated with Nazi Germany during World War II.
  • Russian elites own nearly $100 million dollars worth of property in the United States sold to them by the Trump organization. Trump repeatedly claimed that he had no business connections to Russia, but never explicitly said that Russian oligarchs haven't invested in his properties.
  • Roger Stone, a top informal adviser to Donald Trump, accused the "deep state" of trying to kill him multiple times via poison and in a car crash. Stone appeared on Alex Jones’s conspiracy theory radio show to claim that the "deep state" has "poisoned me, they have smeared me, and someone in a car tried to kill me."
  • Oklahoma state Sen. Ralph Shortey, who was also Donald Trump's campaign chairman for the state of Oklahoma, was caught in a motel room with an underage boy after police were asked to conduct a "welfare check at a local hotel." Police proceeded to find Shortey at a Super 8 motel room with the minor boy. The police are recommending that Shortey be charged with soliciting prostitution of a minor, prostitution within 1,000 feet of church and transporting purpose of prostitution.
  • Donald Trump's personal attorney seemed to threaten MSNBC host Joe Scarborough after the host suggested on Twitter that Trump may have been the person who leaked his 2005 taxes to the press. Scarborough suggested that Trump may have leaked the information to distract from Congressional hearings into Russian involvement in the 2016 election, which prompted Michael Cohen, Trump's personal attorney, to reply with a threat suggesting that Scarborough "better have proof to back up your claim and big mouth!"
  • Breitbart News, the website Steve Bannon used to run, released a leaked audio recording of Speaker Paul Ryan bashing Donald Trump during the campaign and saying that he is "not going to defend Donald Trump — not now, not in the future." Bannon is now Donald Trump's senior adviser in the White House.