Dara Lind

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Dara Lind News & Opinion ArticlesDisplaying 5 Items
  • To many people, the most notable thing about the ongoing takeover of a federal government building in Burns, Oregon, is what it doesn't resemble: law enforcement's response to groups of nonwhite protesters, which is often much more aggressive even when the protesters are not armed, occupying government property, or issuing vague threats about being willing to respond with violence.
  • A Cleveland grand jury and Cuyahoga County prosecutor Tim McGinty decided Monday not to indict police officers in the 2014 killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was playing with a toy gun in a park. Many feel the decision is a miscarriage of justice, and a symbol of how the criminal justice system gives entirely too much deference to cops who shoot people, especially people of color.
  • A Cleveland grand jury and Cuyahoga County prosecutor Tim McGinty decided Monday not to indict police officers in the 2014 killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was playing with a toy gun in a park. Many feel the decision is a miscarriage of justice, and a symbol of how the criminal justice system gives entirely too much deference to cops who shoot people, especially people of color. That might be true. But high-profile incidents where officers aren't indicted, like this case in Cleveland — or aren't convicted, like the Baltimore police officer whose trial in the death of Freddie Gray resulted in a hung jury earlier this month — might be obscuring a broader change in the system.
  • Part of the problem with the gun debate in America is that gun owners and people who aren't comfortable with gun ownership are, to a certain extent, just different kinds of people. This isn't a lament about how there isn't real debate in America anymore. It's a simple fact. Gun owners are more likely to be white, male, and rural. People who don't own guns — and even more so, people who are uncomfortable with them — are more likely to be nonwhite, female, and urban or suburban.
  • Desperate people, fleeing a terrifying, bloodthirsty regime, try to find refuge in the US. But the American government and the public don't want to accept them. They worry that accepting refugees would put citizens at risk, and they don't see the refugee crisis as their problem to fix. So they are turned away. This is what could happen in the US in 2015, if the governors and members of Congress pushing to stop the admission of Syrian refugees have their way. But it's definitely what happened in 1939 to Jews fleeing Nazi Germany. The US (and other countries in the Western Hemisphere) could have saved thousands of Jews from the Nazis. They didn't. At one point, the US literally turned away a ship of 900 German Jews.